98 Sunfire How do I reset the a/c compressor

How do I reset the a/c compressor?

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vo4you67
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vo4you67 wrote:

"Reset the a/c compressor?" ??? That's an odd question. There is no reset on the a/c compressor.
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On Mon, 19 Sep 2005 17:16:54 -0500, vo4you67

Usually disconnecting the negative battery terminal will do it. If you're low on freon it will just kick off again though. What problem are you having?
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After I recharged the system, the gauge read full but it still blew warm air. I thought I had heard the compressor shuts off if it gets too low. Thank You for the info. I will give it a try.
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Yes there is a low-pressure switch that acts like a 'circuit-breaker' for the compressor. It is a 2-wire switch (Off/On type). Low pressure in the line opens the switch and saves the compressor from working with no refridgerant/oil charge. The switch usually located at the accumulator, and can be bridged easy enough with jumper-wires. If the compressor engages when the switch is bridged, most likely the switch if faulty. You posted that the system is now fully-charged, so the switch test is ok to do, just for testing purposes, it is not the 'fix'. The switch isn't expensive and easy to replace. If bridging the switch doesn't engage the clutch on the compressor, then either the clutch is faulty and/or the compressor is.
There is a good reason why the refridgerant charge is low.....a leak. A leak must be found and fixed....maybe a fitting loose enough to leak, a bad compressor, or even a hole in the condenser. A leak usually also means air/moisture has gotten into the system.....a bad thing. There are leak-detector kits available at the parts-stores, but the system has to be operating in order to use one. Check for any oily residue in/on/around the compressor and all fittings in the lines. Oily residue is the sign of a leak. If it turns out that the compressor is bad, then the job is a matter of replacing parts. A rebuilt compressor isn't too expensive. New oil must be installed in the compressor. A new accumulator must be installed. The remainder of the oil charge goes into the accumulator. Also install a new orfice tube. New O-rings should be installed at all required places. If you can replace those parts yourself; the system must then be put in a vacuum for at least one hour or longer. If the vacuum 'holds', then the system can be recharged. Either have a profession do this part(recommended) or rent a vacuum pump, along with a manifold-gauge set, and DIY. If you are not experienced in this procedure the smart thing is have it done by a pro......it can be dangerous TO the inexperienced person!
Bottom-line here is find/fix a leak first, then deal with any faults in the system.
Hope this helps some.....
Dave S(Texas)
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