Auto team drives imports

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Auto team drives imports http://tinyurl.com/d2tzs2
WASHINGTON -- The vehicles owned by the Obama administration's auto team could reflect one reason why Detroit's Big Three automakers are in
trouble: The list includes few new American cars.
Among the eight members named Friday to the Presidential Task Force on the Auto Industry and the 10 senior policy aides who will assist them in their work, two own American models. Add the Treasury Department's special adviser to the task force and the total jumps to three.
The Detroit News reviewed public records to discover what many of the task force and staff members drove, but information was not available on all of the officials, and records for some states were not complete.
At least two task force members don't own a car, and there are still two open slots on the 10-member panel that will be filled by the secretaries of labor and commerce, who have not yet been appointed.
The co-chairs of the task force -- Treasury Secretary Timothy F. Geithner and White House National Economic Council Director Lawrence Summers -- both own foreign automobiles.
Geithner owns a 2008 Acura TSX, registered in New York. He once owned a 1999 Honda Accord and a 2002 Acura MDX, according to public records.
Geithner is the president's designee for purposes of enforcing loan agreements with GM and Chrysler and must approve or reject any proposed transactions by either company that would cost $100 million or more.
His maternal grandfather, Charles Moore, was a vice president at Ford Motor Co. from 1952-63, according to Peter Geithner, the secretary's father. But Geithner wasn't very interested in cars growing up -- in part because he graduated from high school in Asia, his father said.
Summers owns a 1995 Mazda Protege that's registered in Massachusetts. He previously owned a 1996 Ford Taurus GL.
What other task force members drive:
Office of Management and Budget Director Peter Orszag owns a 2008 Honda Odyssey and a 2004 Volvo S60. He previously owned a 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee and 1982 Datsun.
Carol Browner, the White House climate czar, said earlier this month at the Washington Auto Show that she doesn't own an automobile. Public records show she once owned a 1999 Saab 9-5 SE.
Energy Secretary Steven Chu doesn't own a car, his wife, Jean Fetter, said in a telephone interview on Sunday. Cabinet officials are typically transported to and from work by security officials in government vehicles.
Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa Jackson owns a 2008 Toyota Prius and a Honda Odyssey minivan, she said Sunday. "It's great," she said of her Prius.
Vehicle information was not available for Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood or Christine Romer, head of the Council of Economic Advisers.
Here's what task force policy aides drive:
Austan Goolsbee, staff director and chief economist for the White House Economic Recovery Advisory Board, owns a 2004 Toyota Highlander.
Joan DeBoer, the chief of staff to LaHood, said in an interview Sunday she drives a 2008 Lexus RX 350. She doesn't consider herself "a car buff" and views her car as a way to get around town.
Heather Zichal, deputy director of the White House Office of Energy and Climate Change, owns a Volvo C30, according to public records and officials.
Gene Sperling, counsel to the Treasury Secretary, owns a 2003 Lincoln LS, and previously owned a 1993 Saturn SL2.
Edward B. Montgomery, senior adviser to the Labor Department, owns a 1991 Harley-Davidson and previously owned a 1990 Ford Taurus L station wagon, public records show.
Lisa Heinzerling, senior climate policy counsel to the head of the EPA, owns a 1998 Subaru Legacy Outback station wagon, according to her husband.
Diana Farrell, the deputy National Economic Council director, doesn't own a vehicle. Her husband, Scott Pearson, owns a 1985 Peugeot 505 S.
Dan Utech, senior adviser to the Energy Secretary, owns a 2003 Mini Cooper S two-door hatchback.
Rick Wade, a senior adviser at the Commerce Department, owns a 1998 Chevrolet Cavalier and previously owned a 1998 Toyota Corolla.
Jared Bernstein, Vice President Joe Biden's chief economist, owns a 2005 Honda Odyssey.
The White House declined to comment.
President Barack Obama traded in his Chrysler 300C for a more fuel-efficient Ford Escape hybrid during the 2008 presidential campaign.
Joe Biden, the son of a car dealer, owns a 1967 Chevrolet Corvette -- a wedding present from his dad. He primarily commuted from Delaware to the Senate on Amtrak.
Ron Bloom, a special adviser to the Treasury Department who is also advising the task force, owns an aging Ford Taurus.
--
Civis Romanus Sum

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it should be noted the list includes few new american cars because the new american cars don't last very long
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

My "American" cars have all lasted longer than my imports, or my friends imports.
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what imported ladas?
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Camry #1 broke in half due to metal fatigue at 220k miles. Camry #2 floated a valve at 190k miles. The Accord wiped the trans at 160k miles. ALL of my "American" cars went at least 225k miles without any major problems. I traded them in still running, except for the ones that got wrecked. I have stayed away from GM 60 degree engines though.
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2009 08:07:25 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

So you include the entire post, just to add a two line, foolish comment at the end? My American cars have lasted for over 10 years and 250,000 miles. That's not an anomaly, that's a very normal expectation for American cars.
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uhhhhh, ok before 2000 or so, but newer than that ? that's what I am getting at
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2009 13:22:26 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

Sure - post 2000. Not that GM hasn't foisted some bullsh*t problems on their consumers, but the post 2000 cars were most certainly 250,000 mile cars.
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-Mike-
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com turned on the Etch-A-Sketch and wrote:

Hmm...
...troll?
Let's see:

Oh, lookey! A Wintendo-using Google Groups luzer.
Yeah, you opinion is well validated.
--
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Clean out a corner of your mind and creativity will instantly fill it. - Dee
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you are just pissed off because I say GM is the cause of their own crisis- IF they built better cars they would not be where they are now.
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2009 18:38:42 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

Yes they would. Their problems are much deeper than their cars. Their problems are with the management philosophy.
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propogandists to difuse attention from the message. sticks and stones there, boy. you say their cars are now well built and quite respectable, but I ask if they are so well built and respectable then why don't they sell well ? Why are people driving either older cars built before 2000 or newer ones which are largely more expensive imports ? Answer: people got burned by GM and bought elsewhere- conclusion: GM is the author of their own misfortune.You blame the accountants at GM - so you admit the cars are worth squat, eh ? Well, the accountants are still there buddy-boy, Ritchie-Rich and his friends, so they weren't the problem if the problem is solved now, or is the problem and the lousy cars, still there ? What is your answer ? Pick one, either or. If those are good quality cars, then why are carlots so full of them and not parking lots? And really, why is GM in such a bind that WAS WELL KNOWN over a year and a half ago when their disasterous quarterlies were being published- IF they had fixed the problem, their cars should be selling now, because anyone who had bought one of their cars in the past 5 years or so is now needing a new one- oh right, won't get fooled again. Well, that is, unless that fool happens to be you. =================================================== You need to check your facts before you open your mouth. GM is the #1 selling auto maker in the USA, and the #2 in the world. You're opinions are worthless, because (like so many) they are based on incorrect information.
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On Tue, 24 Feb 2009 22:58:03 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com cast forth these pearls of wisdom...:

For the same reason that all car sales are off in part, and in part because GM created a great mass of disenchanted owners with such longstanding and ignored issues as the 60 degree engine gasket issues. I submit it's not about the cars as much as it is about the treatment people go tired of getting from GM.

Because people finally got tired of GM's attitude.

Yes they are, and as long as the leadership remains, that authored that misfortune, they will never move past it.

No - he's saying that the cars are quite good, but the business practices of the company suck.

Not lousy cars. Actually, some quite nice ones, but the management is indeed still there, so the fundamental problem does prevail.

No - anyone buying a car within the last five years does not necessarily need a new one today. Most would probably buy a new one simply because Americans roll their cars within that time. But that's not a quality indicator. Won't get fooled again? Probably too true for a growing number of long time GM buyers.
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Mike Marlow turned on the Etch-A-Sketch and wrote:

Yeah. You got that right. :P
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You nailed it there. I've owned a lot of GM cars over the year and liked them. Then they pissed me off with the last one so I went elsewhere. Will I go back to GM? Possibly, but they will have to work much harder to get me back. I'm very happy with my other brand. They could have kept me for a lot less than it will take to get me back.
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Seems to my anybody who would base their opinion of all the vehicles made by any manufacturer today, GOOD or BAD, on a single experience with one they owned years ago is foolish at best.
I owned a very expensive 1997 Jap car that developed several very expensive repairs. Do you think I should thus assume all of that manufactures luxury cars sold today will be problematic, as well?
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On Wed, 25 Feb 2009 18:20:54 -0500, "Mike Hunter"

new car every couple years, then most everybody else. The "average" person doesn't like to take a $10k or more hit on an unsatisfactory new car. If the mfg won't do something to lessen the pain considerably, the buyer will look elsewhere next time. Customer satisfaction/loyalty isn't rocket science. For some, anyway.
--Vic
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Actually I can buy a new car every two years for far less the $10,000, that is why I do so. The last one I bought was my '09 mustang GT convertible, that I drove home for $5,000. My '07 Mustang GT convertible was still worth big bucks.
I love used car buyers, God bless 'em, who are always willing to buy the cars I no longer want. If I could find folks that would buy my wives used appliances, furniture, clothing and stuff, I would love them as well
In any even I would never be so foolish to judge one vehicle buy another good or bad. Especially, like all manufactured products, vehicles have an average of 2% that will be problematic and I may have purchased one of that 2%. Against the odds I know, but it can happen ;)
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Perhaps, but if I burn my hand on the hot stove, I'm not going to try it again just to be sure. Right now, in addition to all the other problems over the past three years, the brakes are not working. Fluid was lost and re-filling the master cylinder did not fix it. Too damned cold to go crawling around so the hunk of tin sits in the driveway just falling apart.
GM got me to look at other cars, both domestic and imported. Next time I'm going to buy there will be a lot of considerations that GM never faced in the past. GM and the dealer (that sold me other cars too) had an opportunity to make things right and chose not to. Loyalty is gone.
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Ed Pawlowski turned on the Etch-A-Sketch and wrote:

Well, we did lose one today.
My neighbor - who owns a '94 bonneville - came home today with a Toyota GS somethingoranother.
Turns out her Bonneville - with 280,000 miles - had a little work done, due to a water pump issue. The shop forgot to put coolant back in and the block cracked on her way to work today.
Figuring Toyota has a better future she opted for a Lexus rather than a caddy.
One down.
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