Buick LeSabre 94 (80K only) wont drive when "cold"

Before driving, I turn on the ignition, when I switch to Drive (D) or Reverse (R), but the car wouldn't drive. I push gas pedal, nothing happens. Car behaves like in Neutral position. If I let a car to "warm
up" like this for 10-15 minutes and try again - it works. I have spent enormous amount of time reading similar posts from other people. No answer! Nothing at all. I am confused. If this problem is such "popular", when why no one knows how to fix it, no mechanics in this world that know what's going on, no experts that can give advise or even encounter the same problem? "Change transmission" - is NOT an option, if there is no explanation WHY (what's going on). Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
XXX wrote:

Sounds like some really ignorant mechanics in your part of the world. Either that or you don't want to pay them to work on your car.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are a lot of reasons why it might not work. For an older car with a worn pump and low line pressure, it is not uncommon for the car to be slow to shift into gears. In winter, when the ATF is thick, it is even worse. Slow may seem like an eternity.
But that is just a comment. A good tranny man can find the problem. The fix may be a couple of thousand US, depending. But there are few mysteries when a good tranny mechanic gets involved.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The problem is that - how can I trust them? I wen to a mechanic, he just said - rebuild transmission for $2000 :) But he didn't know what the problem is, just a guess. I am not ready to pay that money for just a guess. Besides, if THIS very problem happens to so many people, I am surprised that nobody was able to fix it and tell about the problem..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Try a different trans shop. A good trans man will tell you what's wrong. Go with the guy who feels right. You might get lucky. When you find somebody you trust, leave the car with him long enough so he can duplicate your problem. Trans has to be cool. I did find this. Think you have the same trans. http://autorepair.about.com/library/faqs/bl590h.htm Looks like it'll cost $1500-2000 for the rebuild. You might also try rec.autos.tech or an internet transmission tech forum.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Hi Vic, sounds very similar. What were the symptoms? I understand you rebuilt the transmission. So, what was the problem? Mechanical, Electrical? Why do you think the rebuild was necessary? Maybe not?
Also, let's say I go for the rebuild, why does it cost 2000$. This is not the same as replacing the whole transmission. Why do they say 2000$ if they don't know what the problem is until they actually open/disassemble it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That link wasn't me. Never had that kind of problem. Just looked around the net for you - because I wanted to. I did run across another problem similar to yours, and a guy answered that the problem was a shift sensor or a "warm detent." But I don't trust anything that I read. I don't know transmissions, and when I've had trouble I found a good trans shop. No other way. You have to get the expert to diagnose the problem. Best way to find a good one is to just ask some local mechanics who they recommend for trans work. Don't be shy about asking. Then you have to trust him. No other way. That's life. Nobody burned me. If you leave the car with the shop, which they should ask you to do, the trans guy *will* know what's wrong, and be able to tell you. That's one way to know you have the right guy. Sometimes these guys will only do a complete rebuild on an older car, because they don't want to fix one thing, then have you blame them for something else that goes bad a couple weeks later. Theses transmissions are pretty complicated. Besides, if they have to drop the transaxle, that's a big part of the labor anyway. Maybe you'll get lucky and they can fix something without dropping the transaxle. Good luck, and let us know however it works out. If it costs too much, you might think of just getting another car. $2000 is a lot for a repair on a car that old.
--Vic
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Hi Vic, sounds very similar. What were the symptoms? I understand you rebuilt the transmission. So, what was the problem? Mechanical, Electrical? Why do you think the rebuild was necessary? Maybe not?
Also, let's say I go for the rebuild, why does it cost 2000$. This is not the same as replacing the whole transmission. Why do they say 2000$ if they don't know what the problem is until they actually open/disassemble it? ========================================================= The last tranny I had let go was in a 1991 Bonneville. I went to a trusted junk yard, and after $350 (Canadian), I had a used transmission installed (price was parts, and labor). Transmission worked perfect long after I sold the car (I knew it's next owners). As Vic and others have said, trust is a big issue. You need to find a shop you can trust, but as for rebuilding the transmission, $2000 sounds about right for most places. That's why I choose to get a used one, and the place I got it from even warrantied it for quite some time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Also, let's say I go for the rebuild, why does it cost 2000$. This is not the same as replacing the whole transmission. Why do they say 2000$ if they don't know what the problem is until they actually open/disassemble it?
********** Sometimes you can find a mechanic who will do it for substantially less.
A rebuild entails dropping out the tranny or transaxle, disassembling it piece by piece, cleaning it to almost surgical conditions, identifying the bad components, replacing the worn or unserviceable parts, reassembling the entire system (and some of these reassembly steps require measurements and adjustments as you go), reinstallation, filling with fresh fluid, test the work, adjust or repair if not working within specs, and delivery to the customer.
You must make enough profit to justify the time you spend, your education, the special tools that are required to do it, put beans on the table, and to re-do the job in case you have a return under warranty.
These systems are complex. You ought to see one torn down. You wouldnt believe how many parts, big and small, are involved.
Sure, you can go to a junkyard and buy a used tranny. In many cases, that is a very good solution... In some cases, it can be disappointing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks a lot everyone !!
Now I have a pretty good idea about the issue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
XXX wrote:

Ok, 80k miles... Possibilities: Low fluid clogged filter bad temp sensors clogged passages worn check valves worn servos worn clutches / bands Low fluid pressure due to: worn seals worn pump
A good shop will be able to do a pressure test.
At least change fluid and filter. I'm not a big fan of power flushing and won't subject my own cars to that. If the filter change does not fix it, then its rebuild time. They won't be able to just install a couple of new seals without total disassembly. Installing a few new parts in a worn out trans is asking for more problems soon. No one will warranty the trans without a total rebuild. Or get a used trans.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.