Buick Mispronounces its Own SUV's Name

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It's the Rainier (yet another over-stuffed, over-hyped, bouncy-riding, poorly-engineered, useless American-made cupholder on wheels)
But in the Buick ads, they pronounce it rain-EER.
So embarrassing. But then again- what else could you expect from Detroit?
(in case you have to ask- the name Rainier should be pronounced "ren-YAY".
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On 1/3/04 7:49 PM, ruud wrote:

Unless you live in the US, where Belanger is pronounced BELL-anne-jer (Bell-AWHN-zhay) and foyer is pronounced FOY-yur (foy-YAY). In Washington State, where Mt Rainier exists, it is, I regret, ray-NEER.
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Doug Main
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Whats that one car that they were gonna name up in canada and it meant to jerk off in french...
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LaCrosse
The best is when GM sold the Nova in Spanish contries. Translates into doesn't go.
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Bill 2 wrote:

From Snopes:
Claim: The Chevrolet Nova sold poorly in Spanish-speaking countries because its name translates as "doesn't go" in Spanish.
Status: False.
http://www.snopes.com/business/misxlate/nova.asp
Brian Rodenborn
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to
Funny story: I used to be married to a guy with close relatives from the italian-speaking region of Switzerland. Nice folks. One Christmas, he got his grandparents a welcome mat. No ordinary mat - this one had "VA VIA" printed on it in large friendly letters. They died laughing when it was opened, and they proudly kept it on the porch for years. Since I didn't speak Italian, they told me the reason they laughed at it was because it said "go away". Snopes' debunking states (among other issues) that "nova" and "no va" are two different concepts in Spanish. It doesn't say what "nova" is. Does anyone know?
-- Sharon, Lurking As Usual To reply, replace spammersmustdie with jcwoman1963
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On Thu, 8 Jan 2004, Sharon wrote:

Probably the same thing it means in every other Latin-based language: New.
DS
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"Daniel J. Stern" wrote:

No, 'new' is 'nuevo' in Spanish. Babelfish offers "It novates" which is nonsense. I'm surprised. Babelfish is generally better than that.
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countries
va"
Does
New.
No it isn't. I was in a hotel room and I think they used babelfish to translate the guest service directory. It was talking about using the control on the wall to regulate the unity of the airconditioned. Plus the keyboard on the computer was setup wrong. It was set to french, but didn't match the layout of the keyboard. I just set it to english and typed blindly.
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Sharon wrote:

Same thing as in English, a star that suddenly changes in intensity.
Ed
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Explodes. :-)
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/"\ Bernd Felsche - Innovative Reckoning, Perth, Western Australia
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That's a supernova. Not the same thing.
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Bill 2 wrote:

Urban Legend.
Spanish Definition - Nova: Astron, Estrella cuyo brillo experimenta bruscas variaciones
English translation of the Spanish definition - Astron: Star whose brightness experiences abrupt variations
(Astron is an abbreviation for Astronomy)
Ed
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On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 10:22:07 -0500, "C. E. White"

How about "No va"?
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Brandon Sommerville
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On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 15:46:14 GMT, Brandon Sommerville

What some asshole American did when he put together two Spanish words to make up a tale that everybody knows is false.
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Go to this page: http://www.google.ca/language_tools?hl=en
Type "No va", select "Spanish to English", hit the translate button and see what comes up. Since I'm not sure you're smart enough to follow something this complicated, I'll just jump right to the answer for you: "it does not go".
Still confused?
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Brandon Sommerville
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Brandon Sommerville wrote:

But the car was not named No Va. It was named Nova, which means the same thing in Spanish as it does in English.
Ed
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On Thu, 08 Jan 2004 16:37:46 -0500, "C. E. White"

And there's some magical pronunciation difference between the two?
Have you never heard someone say in English that it's a "Nogo"?
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Brandon Sommerville wrote:

So what? The urban legend, which is that people in Mexico (them dumb furriners) didn't buy the car because they thought the name meant "no go", isn't credible. It's been pointed out that it doesn't mean that and that there is a word that it matches exactly and means something different.
Did many people in the US buy a Yugo because it kind of sounds like "you go"?
Brian Rodenborn
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On Fri, 9 Jan 2004 00:31:12 GMT, Default User

No one would have suddenly *not* bought the car due to the name, but a bad name can lower sales. This is why the muscle cars were named Mustang, Firebird, Barracuda, etc.... Do you think that the Mustang would have sold nearly as well if it had been named the Holstein?
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