Car licensing question

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What is so hard for you to understand proof of ownership is REQUIRED to transfer a Title. Logic says If it were not, why have titles, just use bills of sales as they do in non-title states. Think man, think.


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Mike Hunter wrote:

The proof of ownership is the TITLE. The current owner signs the back of the title and fills in the mileage statement, signs the bill of sale and hands the paperwork to the new owner. DONE. The transfer of ownership is finished when the NEW OWNER goes to the DMV and files for a title in their name.
There is NO requirement for the current owner (the OP in this case) to PROVE anything.
What he did wrong was allow the person who got the car drive away with HIS plates on the car.
What he should have done was pull the plates off, scrape the sticker off the glass and THEN sign the title over. At that point the new owner is responsible for getting his proof of insurance, title application and registration application to the DMV within 30 days. Then HE owns the car not the OP.
The OP NEVER has to go to the DMV if he doesn't want to. He can mail the plates back if he chooses.
--
Steve W.

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I give up, you are certainly are not the sharpest pencil in the pack.

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wrote:

I already told you what happened to my neighbor when she didn't get the title transfer done "officially" to protect herself. And the State's Attorney told me the only way to protect yourself when we chatted after I did the deposition as to the sale. Illinois looks pretty much the same as NY in how title transfers are done. Her plates and Chicago city sticker were removed from the car. I did that myself. Didn't make a difference. The VIN was on the car, the state of Illinois had her as the title holder, and they came after her. All this handing somebody your title and trusting them to do the right thing is fine and dandy if you're dealing with an honest person. She wasn't. The guy didn't do the transfer, but got drunk, smashed up 2 cars and an old lady, then booked to Mexico. He either had no plates on the car, or stolen plates. The OP gave everything in his name to a joker with an arrest warrant out on him. So what do the cops and injured parties do even with no plates? They look up the VIN in the state registration database, and come after the owner. If I hadn't witnessed the sale, everybody's assumption would have been it was her car and it was her boyfriend driving it. Because she was the titled owner. It's really not hard to understand that, and that the bureaucrats who write title transfer instructions and the cops, lawyers and State's Attorneys are entirely different people. You can follow your state's instruction on title transfers, but if the buyer happens to not do his part, you can find yourself in deep doo doo. Your choice really. A bill of sale and a witness to the transaction will protect you, but IMO just getting the damned thing notarized and sent off to the state when you do the transaction is the best way. When things go wrong it's a big hassle. She was worried sick for weeks, and who's to say her witness (me in this case) would still be around and willing to testify. I was grilled pretty good, and I was a professional with no criminal record. I could see they were looking to trip me up. Anybody can fabricate a bill of sale, and I really believe without my testimony she would have been hurt bad. A totaled new Caddy and old lady in the hospital all banged up get the cops and lawyers and insurance companies all fired up. That's why I ALWAYS bring the parties to a notary and get the title transfer sent to the state when I buy or sell a car. Why take a chance with this when you can do it right?
--Vic
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Shit, no!!! I killfiled him years ago. The only way I ever see his posts are as headers in responses..
He is truly a piece of doodoo.
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If you don't like to hear the truth, why kill the messenger? Why not listen and learn? LOL
wrote in message

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On 6/11/2010 3:05 AM, dog arms wrote:

At a minimum, you need to get the plates back and have him sign your copy of the Bill of Sale to prove that you sold it. Otherwise, you have no proof that he bought it. If he gets parking tickets, it's you on the hook as the registered owner. If you put insurance back on the vehicle again, and the insurance company finds out that you sold the vehicle to him, you give them an excuse not to cover any loss.
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in chedog arms wrote:

Depends on the particular state.
If it was Calif., he files a transfer of liability form with the DMV and he's off the hook. (However filing a false form is a major no-no.)
pj
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I think that here in Texas, to be safe, you should walk the re-registration through the tax office WITH the purchaser.. If you dont, you never know what he or she is going to do.
It isnt law that you do this, but you would be much safer to do it.
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