Chevy 2.2 Timing chain

I was going down the road at about 45 in my 1996 S10 when it just quit running. I am lucky I got it to the side of the road before getting ran over. Tried to restart it. Its cranking sound is different now. I don't
here the compression strokes. Would not fire at all.
I am assuming the timing chain has either jumped a gear or broke. Its cold so its not a today project. Or could this be some kind of tensioner problem. I thought the 2.2 was not an interference engine. Is this true? Otherwise, i suppose its straight to taking the head off.
What are the issues with timing chain tensions on the 2.2? What special tools are required? DO i need to pull the harmonic balancer as well as the cam gear? All insight before the tear down will be appreciated.
Bob
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I would think the first thing to do is determine if it is the timing chain rather than jumping to conclusions. A little diagnostic work may save you a lot of grief.

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Woody wrote:

Since the truck is dead, grief is relative. Its Not turning over with the proper compression sound. A little on line research shows that its not uncommon for the chain tensioner on 2.2 to go bad on these and possibly cause the chain to jump teeth. Got it towed by a buddy and i will tear into it next week. I am hoping if it is just a jump of a few teeth that there is no valve damage. I did not hear any mechanical noise when it quit. Or when i cranked it after the fact. I have heard noise in the front of the engine for awhile. I assumed it was just the serp belt tensioner. My fault for NOT looking closer at it before it died.
Now the task is trying to figure out how to get it apart. I do have the shop manual now. Hopefully standard pullers will allow me to remove the crank pulley and the crank pulley mount flange.
The timing chain cover seems to bolt to the oil pan. (the shop manual shows two lower bolts into the oil pan) The manual does not say specifically if the oil pan has to come off or not. Also, the tensioner is an issue. Is the OEM any better than an after market or des it matter? Surely Ian would know about this and shed some light on the situation.
Bob

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Bob Urz wrote:

You may find that chain is broken. I've seen a few of these engines where the tensioner goes sideways and things get jammed up and the chain gets broken.

Yes, no big deal really.

You don't have to take off the oil pan. The seal on the front cover to the oil pan is RTV, so once you've cleaned all the old RTV off, and have cleaned both the pan surface and the front cover surface so that they are "clean and dry", you can simply lay down a good bead of RTV on the pan surface and then put the front cover in place.
I seem to remember that the tensioner on this engine has been updated. I've used aftermarket ones years ago on the same basic engine, and they ended up coming apart in weeks.
Oh, the front timing cover seal does require a special tool to get into the front cover properly when the front cover is still attached to the engine, but if you have the front cover off, you ought to be able to find something that is the correct diameter to use as an installer.
Ian
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shiden_kai wrote:

knowledgeable about it that you should know. Now, your comment about the tensioner has got me thinking. The after market ones are around $20. I have not looked at one yet. There was another post i found on Google about a guy who said he had tensioners go bad ever 3000 to 5000 miles and it drove him nuts. Could this be the issue with the aftermarket tensioners being crap? Talked to my brother in law who talked to his friend who does GM work and he seemed to think that most of the time only the top cam gear and chain need to be replaced (and tensioner). Do you think after market parts are OK for the chain and cam gear?
He also said he has seen some 2.2's with holes in the pistons and bent valves. IN the units you have seen, how common is this?
Bob
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Bob Urz wrote:

Probably...I never had any luck with them and went back to just using the GM stuff. I can't remember why I went with the aftermarket stuff, as I'm usually not into that. Probably had a cheap friend on my hands (grin).

Oh yeah...the chain and gears seem to be fine even if they are aftermarket. I'd agree too about the crank sprocket...unless you can feel marks in it from the chain...I wouldn't bother changing it.

Haven't seen that....but my advice would be to install a new chain and tensioner and before you even put the front cover back on....do a compression test. This will tell you right away if you bent any valves. This is what I do so I don't waste my time and the customers money putting the engine all back together again.
Ian
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Bob Urz wrote:

Just how good are you at "hearing compression strokes" there Bob? Have you ever broken a timing belt? Usually, the engine turns over extra fast and that's pretty obvious. If that's not what you heard as confirmation, then maybe you are wrong in diagnosing the belt right off the bat. A fuel pump can quit like that all of a sudden as well. And there's more.....
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itsallgood wrote:

Yes, i have. On my old Mazda that used a belt. And the sound of cranking was instantly obvious that something was different. In the mazdas case it was a belt, and a belt replacement got it back running. Same thing on the S10. I know what it sounds like normal. It is cranking faster and does not have the "same sound". Fuel or ignition problems would not cause it to sound that different. No I am not an expert. But i do a lot of my own work. I was hoping someone here had a 2.2 that had similar problems for insight on the issue.
Usually, the engine turns over extra

Yes, that's sort of what it seems. MY theory now is it jumped a few teeth. Monday or Tuesday i well get the front of the motor tore down and take the timing cover off. My B.I.L. is more of a mechanic guy is going to listen to it before we tear into it. What i need to figure out is what special tools i need if any. I have access to some pullers. But i don't know if i need to replace the oil seal on the timing chain cover if its intact. The shop manual mentions some special seal driver and centering tool.
It really seems premature to tear the head off. I think i would rather roll the dice and take the timing cover off and check the timing marks and to see if the chain and tensioner is intact. Then replace the parts, align them and see if it runs. If the head, pistons or valves were damaged, i doubt that i could make it any worse.
If that's not what you heard as

before i go there..... Wish me luck.
Bob
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I am not familiar with the 2.2 at all, but i know on the older V8 engines you could remove the oil fill cover and crank over the engine to see if the valves are moving, if they arent moving, good chance that it is the timing belt/chain...

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