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Rick_LT1 wrote:


Sold the TRS-80 and got to play with the prototypes as well. Still have some Z-80 chips in stock from a former job.
--
Steve W.

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wrote in message

Some of that old stuff from the past would be worth still having today. Just for the nostalgic value of it. I kept so much stuff from over the years, always thinking it would be neat to keep as reminders of the old days at some point, but finally I cleaned house and chucked it all. Now I wish I hadn't.
--

-Mike-
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Aaahhhh... the "trash-80" Trying to read the ( overpriced ) cassete was "iffy" And the tin-plate connectors that corroded up. I unloaded it soon as I could.
The COMMODORE-64 is still my favorite. A $600 floppy disk drive was painful. The modem was a modestly priced 300bd plug-in. First on-line experience was with local BBS's.
Didn't go internet until the early 90's with an IBM PC. AOL was the big player.... and the tough part was getting "local" dial-up service into smaller towns.
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a joke, apart from the morons among us.
--
Clive

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wrote:

I don't doubt the guy's tale. I've heard some outrageous claims about how bad the Celebrity was from American car bashers. One guy I worked with - he drove an early Altima that's long been in heaven with all its kin, and knew squat about cars - actually told me his father-in-law had the entire dashboard of his Celebrity fall into his lap. Yep, he actually thought this was true. Though I found my '88 by far the best car I ever had, it was silver too, and the paint was peeling off the roof by '96. This is a well known GM issue of certain era vehicles, and was not appropriately handled by GM. Since I bought my '88 in '91 with 31k miles and only paid @$6500 and it was near perfect in all other ways until 190k miles, I really didn't care about the peeling paint on the roof. I'm not cosmetics oriented, and the underlying primer stayed sound. But I sure can understand the anger of anybody paying for a new car and having the paint peel after a couple years. This gets back to what I said about GM model incompetence. Looks like the best-selling 85' Celebrity was markedly improved by '88, but GM dumped it by '89. Probably because its name was mud among too many customers GM screwed. So instead of digging in, doing right by the customers, and continuing to improve the Celebrity, they dropped it and replaced it with the Lumina. Which immediately garnered customer complaints about the real calipers. Lame. BTW, my main ride is a '97 Lumina, and the rear drums are fine, as is everything else. They continued to improve it I suppose. I got it for $2500 and have put about 40k miles on it with no problems except a window motor and the signal switch. My kid fixed those for about 120 bucks in parts. Except it's white, and the paint began peeling off in sheets a couple years ago. Rear quarter panels and hood. Lots of them with the same problem around here, but only the white ones. Oh, and the drivers seat cushion is collapsed on the left side. Went to the dealer to see if I could get a new one, but you can't. Suggested an upholstery shop to respring it. My kid looks for a good seat whenever he goes to the boneyard, but every one he sees is collapsed. That might be why they discontinued the Lumina. Too stupid to design a seat that wouldn't collapse, and white paint that didn't peel. Easier to just discontinue a well-selling model and move on to something else. Keep the suckers guessing. Maybe there's also some bonus play in there for management. Keep in mind, this was Chevy's family sedan answer to the Accord and Camry. WTF were the pinheads running GM thinking? Maybe they can get their act together, but it's no mystery how they let it all fall apart in the first place. They didn't have the attention span to put longevity and quality into their models, and thereby gain brand loyalty. Looks like the FWD Impala and Malibu have lasted longer than most Chevy models, and I expect the newer ones are pretty good. This bankruptcy thing might be good for GM. Keeps the boneheads running the company too busy to replace their successful models.
--Vic
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On Tue, 26 May 2009 17:43:22 -0500, Vic Smith

Absolutely! I was just making a joke.

Yeah, it wasn't known as one of GM's greatest cars. My parents had an 84 with the 2.5L four, and it was a dog. I think they got about 105k miles out of it before they traded it, though. Rust was becoming an issue at that time also. No serious mechanical problems, though.

I doubt I could have kept from laughing at that.

Yeah, the paint issues that GM had in the mid 80's to the mid 90's really are inexcusable.

Now that you mention it, I do recognize that as a pattern for a few of GM's cars in the last couple of decades. Perhaps I've been lucky because I always buy the models in their later years, so perhaps the cars I've bought had most of all the bugs worked out of them by the time I took ownership.

Sounds very similar to their headliners that inevitably sag after a few good years that another poster mentioned recently.

Some of their issues really make you ask that, don't they?
I have to say, though, on the whole, I've been happy with my GM cars. I tend to buy 'em new and drive 'em til they drop, though.

The thing that I wonder about is how will the build quality be on their cars? If all your line workers feel they're getting screwed, that doesn't bode well for quality built cars.
Time will tell, I guess.
--
Rick

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because a reformulation of the standard paint to make it less toxic also made it less resistant to acids such as bird turds.
--
Clive

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What's it like to be an idiot 24/7? A Lumina was a family-sized car, and if that wasn't big enough for you, Chevy had the Caprice, and later the Impala. Grab a clue, and complain about something worthwhile.
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On Sun, 24 May 2009 00:25:13 -0400, "80 Knight"

MyGod.... what's it like to be dyslexic ? Do you read ? Do you COMPREHEND ?
The topic is CHEVROLET ! Do you know what a CHEVROLET is ? Biscayne, Caprice, Impala and BelAir were levels of trim on the ( family sized ) Chevy.
Next time, put brain in gear before engaging keyboard.
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You're still an idiot, and you didn't even talk about anything I said in my post. You said the family sized Chevy was relegated to the back burner, and I told you the truth, and that is that there has always been a full-size Chevy, such as the Caprice and Impala.
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--
Clive

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writes

Yeah, 2 of them.
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