Compression Fittings On Brake Lines ?

Hello:
Several years ago, i had a few brake lines repaired at a service station due to their rusting out. Have a '97 Buick LeSabre.
Since then, no problems.
I just brought the car in for a state inspection at a local Buick Dealership, and they said that it would not pass as the service station that did the repair apparently used compression fittings, rather than flared, on the brake line fittings.
So,
I guess flared would certainly be better, but is this something I should now make a big deal over with the service station that did the work a few years ago ?
Can compression fittings (also) be considered "safe", or MUST they be flared ?
Any thoughts would be most appreciated.
Thanks, Bob
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that
on
now
years
Rule of thumb, NEVER use compression fittings on brake lines. They don't have the pressure capability of flared fittings. Any real mechanic wouldn't use compression fittings on brake lines. Taking it back to the garage that did the work may fall on deaf ears, but worth a shot if you have the receipt.
Whether or not it will pass inspection is usually left up to the discretion of the inspecting mechanic. However, check your applicable laws to see if it specifically states you are not allowed to use compression fittings and/or you must use a certain style of flared fitting. Then contest the mechanics decision to not pass your vehicle. You could also try another inspection station to see if they overlook the use of a compression fitting.
If it was me, I'd just replace it with the proper flared fitting. Much easier. ;)
Steve
Steve
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Robert11 wrote:

In NY at least compression fittings are illegal (since 8/13/03)
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Steve W.
Near Cooperstown, New York
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a double flare fitting is really all thats considered safe. the gas station guy got you down the road. luckily with no ill affects.....i didnt see where you mentioned what state you are insp. in.....i know my state insp consists of: paperwork good, 10 dollar bill good, most lamps working = insp for a year...(horn normally optional)...............kjun
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Robert11 wrote: <snip>

It sounds like someone took a short cut and replaced a section of line with a new piece and attached the repair to the old line with compression fittings. This might be ok with a low pressure line such as an automatic transmission cooling line, but is a big no-no for high pressure hydraulics. The correct repair is to replace the entire line with a new one and connect it with double flared fittings at both end, just like it came from the factory.
Compression fittings are not rated for the full pressure a brake system can develop. You do not want to discover that it isn't up to the job when you are on a full panic stop situation, especially when the ABS kicks in and starts hammering on the hydraulics.
Your inspector did you a favor! Fix it right.
John
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You could also flare the end of the existing "good" section of tube and use a union to connect it to the repair section; that is also an acceptable repair.
nate
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wrote:

If you double flare - not just flare.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

True; I ASSumed the use of double flares but that's a good clarification as I believe single flares are still commonly used for some HVAC applications.
nate
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Funny isn't it? We get used to just doing this kind of thing and don't even think twice about it. But... it seems every time I've fixed brake lines with someone, they've been surprised at the idea of double flaring. They never heard about it or seen how to do it. So, I've taken to pointing out the obvious in DIY stuff like this.
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Mike Marlow wrote:

True enough. It doesn't help that the flaring tools commonly sold at auto parts stores and other places are mostly the single flare type.
John
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clarification
even
They
out
Agreed.
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