Detroit auto makers try some new tricks

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"U.S. auto makers are building higher-quality cars, but they can't get buyers to get over the fact that they're American cars...."
Wall Street Journal article: http://301url.com/c8x

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Ed wrote:

Because US auto makers waited too long to stop making cars that looked like furniture or copies of German or Japanese cars.
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"larry moe 'n curly" ...

I think it's cool. I'd love to drive an American car again, without having to run it back and forth to the shop. Seriously, I'm willing to give them another chance.
Natalie
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On Sep 15, 6:29 pm, "Wickeddoll"

I had two 05 Hondas: A civic hybrid and an Element. While both were decent cars, their mileage left a lot to be desired; nowhere near what was advertised. Because of that, I traded them both in a bought two new Chevy Malibu SS's , a Maxx and the sedan. As far as I'm concerned, at least to this point, they are the best running, most comfortable cars I've ever owned...no more Japanese cars here.
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Enjoy that Malibu when its in the shop. I hate the feel of shop chairs. Hard plastic and that little 12 inch TV in the waiting room.
BTW, you were concerned about fuel, so you went and bought a car that gets 18 mpg in the city?
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wrote:

I had two 05 Hondas: A civic hybrid and an Element. While both were decent cars, their mileage left a lot to be desired; nowhere near what was advertised. Because of that, I traded them both in a bought two new Chevy Malibu SS's , a Maxx and the sedan. As far as I'm concerned, at least to this point, they are the best running, most comfortable cars I've ever owned...no more Japanese cars here.
What mpgs do the Malibus get?
Cathy
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"Cathy F." ...

Yeah, that doesn't sound very economical. But maybe he's talking about the way the car feels/drives.
Natalie
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That occurred to me, too. But, if he traded in the Element & Civic hybrid because they didn't get the advertised mpg, then... ??? - the logic gets lost, considering they must get better mileage than the Malibus. Plus, I'm guessing the Maxx costs more than either of the Hondas. In which case a part of the picture - which may've been a revised one - wasn't expressly stated in the post.
Cathy

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Wickeddoll wrote:

I don't have the resources to take that gamble and maybe lose. Many times burned I just cannot take the risk even though the potential of the Chevy Volt did tempt me.
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"Jim Higgins" ...

I'm watching the Ford Fusion. I think it has potential.
Natalie
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I had the V6 Fusion as a one day rental, drove about 300 very fast highway miles. It impressed me very much, very well designed spacious body, very good handling and power.
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"Some O" >,

I'm waiting to see if it has any *long-term* problems, though. That's the true test. I think it's safe to say that *any* vehicle will run well at first.
Natalie
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That's very wise. Initial quality is just one aspect of quality. I do the same, waiting at least one model year for a new design, two+ model years if the drive train has been changed. Sometimes it can be very difficult to determine if there is a significant drive train change. I've been stung by both GM and Chrysler recognizing when a significant change was made and not waiting. The internet is a great help here.
Chrysler now has a life time drive train warranty. That would not have been of value with our Chrysler products since 1986. I had very bad manual transmission problems with my 1981 TC3, thank goodness Chrysler finally replaced it after the warranty because they didn't get it right during the warranty.
It should have been of value when my wife's 2001 Sebring had the front wheel bearings fail at only 30K miles and 3 months before the power train warranty expired. We then learned that wheel bearings are not part of the power train. My, not all the power train is part of the power train!
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wrote:

GAH!
I really hope for their sake they learn and grow from having their asses handed to them by the American public. I don't remember domestic carmakers hitting this much of a low in the past, so maybe this will be a big enough black eye to make them realize they need to change their act.
Natalie
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"Joe" ...

Well, I can't speak for the haters, but I try never to condemn the product because of the salesman. I think that's a pretty narrow-minded way to look at things.
Natalie
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But in a way, he's right. I know a lot of people that can point to similar treatment from dealers. My dad would NEVER take the car back to a dealer once he bought it. We had a lot of GM cars. It's gotten so bad that the new car dealers in Chicago have banded together and started an ad campaign to try to convince people they should buy used cars and get their car serviced at a new car store.
"When you buy a used car at a new car store, You get a great deal, and a great deal more."
Of course I replace the third and fourth lines with, You get f***ed in the a$$, With a steel wool pad!
And I'm starting to see that attitude from some of the Toyota dealers, too. I guess they've had it too good for too long. And no Ray O about to remind them what they're on about. Schaumburg Toyota is OK, but there's another dealer around here that acts more like the old-style GM dealers every day. They even started advertising putting nitrogen in tires. If you really want a cool running tire, why not put hydrogen in it? Then if you ever got struck by lightning, you could watch the Hindenburg effect. <g>
Charles of Schaumburg
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"n5hsr" ...

ROFL - Bitter? Oh, a tad...

You know what, sales is a sleazy business, no matter what it is. They're always trying to hook you into something you don't need, by trying to convince you that you can't live without it, or that you'll miss out.
My son works for a large electronics corporation, that rhymes with "Chest Pie." He used to be in computer sales, now he's on something that rhymes with the "Peek Odd" ;-) When he was selling puters, he said they didn't make their money from the computer's sale (they usually sold them below wholesale price) - it's the other extraneous shit that makes them the bucks! For instance, with his employee discount, he can buy Ethernet cable, that normally costs $20 retail, for $1.50! What a markup!
Natalie
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I was a department mangager in a then-growing Southern discount chain about 25 years ago. I used to try to get customers to buy more stuff, not because it was good for me, but oftimes what they were doing was going to be not as good. I sold paint, among other things. I used to try to get people painting to do the prep work, so the paint job would last. I tried to make sure they had what they needed to do the job. Brushes, masking tape, remover. Sometimes primer, depending on the job. Drop cloths, what have you. I hate sleazy, greasy salesmen.
Charles of Schaumburg
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The vehicles sold in dealerships today are all the same in that the must meet all of the same federal safety, fuel and emission standards. The only real difference among all of the brands is cost of driving the vehicle of the lot. There are no "tricks" in the car business, it is all a game. The dealerships have always tried to make as much profit as possible. Nobody walks into a retail store and asks for a discount on a stove or refrigerator, but when going into a car dealership they always want a discount, hence the games to tack on a few hundred dollars.
When I was in retail we sold just about every brand on the market in our stores in six states. The fact is we were always made greater profits in our import brand store because we able to charge higher shop rates, give lower discounts on the selling price and pay less for the trades in our import brand stores than in our domestic brand stores. That in itself says a lot about how astute is the average import brand buyer is compared to domestic buyers. Import intenders are not the informed buyer they think that are.
When I was in the fleet service business it was quite apparent from our records that there is very little difference among brands, foreign or domestic when it came to longevity, but a big difference in the cost of repairs when it does come time to make a repair. That is the primary reason few fleets, except rental fleets that keep the cars a year or less, buy import brands. ;)
mike

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Mike Hunter wrote:

That's because the posted prices for appliances are normally already discounted from list, unlike those for cars.
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