Detroit auto makers try some new tricks

Page 6 of 16  


I'm on the fence. They *must've* seen which way the wind was blowing in the early-mid-70's, yet completely ignored it. I jumped ship, along with lots of others.
Cathy

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You've answered your own question. They got to the place they are now by pulling the same shit. They are being ruined by it. If they weren't pulling the same shit all along they would not be in dire straights now. Good business sense? It would be great if they had any at all.
They will not change until they are out of business. Buy that Fusion. Trust me, its just another iteration of the SOS.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Joe" ..

I hope you're wrong. I don't to see domestic cars fade away; especially for auto workers. Yeah, they voted the union weasels in, but I don't think they should be forever punished for that.
Natalie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi!

Fair enough.

Now that one was--if I'm not mistaken--an excellent concept. At the very least, they sold well and you *still* see plenty of them on the road. Some have even said the K-car was the car that pulled Chrysler back from the brink of failure.
I bought one for $100 and put a little money into it to make it into a workable car once again. Now it runs and drives pretty well, even if the paint is oxidized and the body has some not insignificant rust. Twenty three years later the interior has really held up nicely.
In fact, my only complaint is what sits under the hood....a 2.6 liter Mitsubishi engine. Today it seems to be impossible to find anyone who wants anything to do with the carburetion system...in other words, heaven help you if it breaks. It's only through the OEM service manual and a lot of tinkering that I've learned anything about how it is supposed to work. And it's still not quite right...it does run, but I think the Chrysler 2.2 would have been the better engine choice at the time.
I suppose that it is also a matter of what you're used to as well. I can't complain about Japanese and other Asian cars, many people have them and are quite happy. But they are different beasts and I can't help but wonder if the same thing will happen parts and service wise for them in 23 years.
William
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

three
wants
you
would
are
Trust me it does. I owned a 1980 Datsun 210 for a number of years. Very reliable and good car, went through 3 transmissions and 2 engines. I really liked the ability to lay under the car and unbolt and change out the transmission by hand, no trans jack required, since the trans was so light. However I had to unload it about 3 years ago because parts were just getting too difficult to find anymore. And I definitely have nothing good to say about Nissan support and its's dealerships. I had on more than 1 occassion, used parts sold to me by the dealership where they claimed they were new, and claimed they had come out of the warehouse all covered with black greasy fingerprints, and the bag slit open and taped back together. The guy who bought it wanted it for a 60's Datsun truck he was restoring.
Ted
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wickeddoll wrote:

I don't think any car company, whether American, Japanese, German, or Korean, cares about customers very much, but some companies have a lot more money to spend on customers than others do, and it's probably safer to bet on them.

Because not everybody learns from their mistakes? The American car makers' slide didn't start just a few years ago but has been brewing for 15-20 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 15 Sep 2007 15:53:30 -0700, larry moe 'n curly

Why is it that every defect that ever occurs in an American car is remembered forever no matter how minor. But Toyota sells entire lines of cars with engines that sludge up and burn up and no one gives a rats ass.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That may be because when the American car companies have a problem they do nothing about it, such as the leaking GM intake gaskets. When Toyota has a problem they take care of it by extending the warranty or issuing a recall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you kidding? When they had the door locks that shorted and locked you in the car and then caught fire they denied the problem existed till they lost in court. They routinely denied the sludge problem claiming the owners weren't changing the oil even when the owners had receipts for the work. Just another example of how people just look at Toyotas with their rose colored glasses on and at American cars with a kaleidoscope from hell.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ashton Crusher wrote:

It is mind boggling how the public and especially the auto industry itself trusts receipts on oil and filter changes. It's a dilemma that dealers and third party companies often charge for oil and filter changes without doing them, but I would not be surprised at all if the sludging problems aren't to some significant degree due to oil changes *not* being done even though receipts show that they were.
Combine that with the fact that some of the problem cars have a questionable 7500 mile change interval specified, and it doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure it out (15,000 miles or longer between oil changes that have been fraudulently documented by the dealers and oil change stores).
I can only conclude that the manufacturers know all of this, but they cannot publicly bring up the fact that they know that customers are being defrauded on oil and filter changes - often by their own dealers. IMO the manufacturers are guilty on 2 counts: (1) Screwing the customer when they have receipts instead of going after the fraudulent dealers and companies, and (2) Covering for the fraudulent dealers and oil change franchises - IOW take action against those dealers and companies instead of screwing the innocent customer.
That's not to say that certain engines aren't more sensitive to longer change intervals than others - that's indisputable IMO. The fraudulent change documentation just makes it a huge problem.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bill your missing the point.
The idea works like this: The auto mfgr's wave the warranty over their customers heads to threaten them to go to the dealerships for the oil changes. The dealerships rake in the bucks doing fradulent oil changes, selling window wipers and all kinds of crap. Then the car conks out and the customer takes it to the dealer for warranty work and the factory doesen't pay the dealer for all the time the warranty work takes to do, so the raked-in big bucks are spent on the warranty work.
The entire point of the system isn't to have a well-maintained car. The entire point of the system is to have a poorly maintained car that is in and out of the shop all the time, so the dealerships have work to do, and the car is so poorly maintained that 6 months after the customer has traded in the car, (and 5 months after the dealership has re-sold the traded-in car) the car conks out completely. In that way the auto makers insure that there isn't a flood of good used vehicles on the market, depressing new car sale prices, and they keep their dealerships happy with the service revenue.
Ted
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's quite a story, but one I've not experienced. What I did experience from my dealer was so much pressure to look at the Chrysler 300 they I no longer trusted them to service my 9+ yr old Chrysler. Other customers must have done the same, because my dealer sold his Chrysler dealership and kept his Toyota dealership.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have seen at least two Toyota dealerships that won't work on 'old' Toyotas, and they really pressure you to buy a new one. There's one just south of the southern suburbs here in Chicago that's been a joke for at least 15 years, if not longer and he won't work on any car over 2 years old, and will not work on the car if you didn't buy it from him.
Charles of Schaumburg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"n5hsr"

Wow, I've never had that problem. They've always worked on our cars, even the Corolla FX 16 that was 17 years old the last time we had it serviced. (it now belongs to my mom)
Natalie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ashton Crusher wrote:

So you claim. I've never seen any evidence that what you claim is true.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are web sites devoted to the problem. Try googling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You gotta start reading posts here and elsewhere. How can Toyota EVER be able to properly handle problems when they NEVER have problems to begin with? If you believe things posted here, or articles written in Comsumers Digest, then you know nothing ever goes wrong with these Toyotas.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And oh,boy, have they EVER been issuing recalls in the past couple of years. I guess that says a whole lot about the Japanese "reliablilty",. eh?"??

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike wrote:

Only after spending FIVE YEARS stating that, "It was just owners who didn't change their oil regularly." Oh yeah, that Toyota service is the *greatest*. Just like Honda back in the 90s saying "Ignitors? What ignitors? We don't see ANY problems with ignitors. By the way, we installed a new ignitor, now quit complaining."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ashton Crusher wrote:

Because it didn't really happen. Nothing was wrong. It was the owners' fault.
:-p
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.