DEX-COOL, Conventional Green, & G-05... My Experiences

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Buford T. Justice wrote:


No it doesn't. There's no such thing as the "steaming process". The temperature at which a given liquid vaporizes depends on the temp AND PRESSURE. Water vaporizes (its 'boiling point') at 212F at one atmosphere pressure (nominal sea level). And that's pure water. At higher pressures and with additives such as those present in automotive coolant it's quite a bit higher. You have obviously never taken a physics or thermodynamics course.
And this is the last time I'm gonna explain this...
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IT
to
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to
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Take
I'm thinking you must have failed that class. Bob
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Did you do the experiment before you decide to post here for posterity? No you didn't. Get lost freak.
BTJustice

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No
Get an education fool. Bob
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Get a life bitch.
BTJustice

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Take
It's called an increase in the vapor pressure in the air space as the temperature increases. However, the same thing would occur with a large increase in temperature even well below the boiling point. By your definition, even a glass of water at room temperature is "starting to boil".
--
Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
To email, remove "nospam" from snipped-for-privacy@nospamshaw.ca
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boil".
LOL. No. That is not my definition.
BTJustice
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"Buford T. Justice" wrote

Can there be anything worse then people posting on the newsgroup their opinions of Dexcool, or regular coolant usage and not even have a basic grasp of the operation of a cooling system? It's unbelievable really, and not worth discussing any further until you do some studying up on cooling system basics.
Ian
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It is amazing that people wonder through a thread without knowing anything and have to leave a stupid comment such as yours that will be a part of this thread forever. I doubt you know how it works numbnuts.
BTJustice

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Its obvious you dont know who you are addressing there.
says...

-- --------------------------------------- -Bonneville -Formerly known as -Bonnevilles R Kewl ---------------------------------------
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And your point is???
BTJustice

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this
Ian's not a dumb guy, he's quite knowledgeable when it comes to GM cars and I've seen him help alot of people out.
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Well he seems to be a smartass. Nobody knows everything. I certainly admit to that. My original post was about my experiences with DEX-COOL, conventional green, and G-05. In fact, I started a new thread about G-05 and he left a smartass comment on it.
I regret even mentioning steam in anyway, shape, or form which I think I typed after reading the article below (second paragraph)...
http://www.caranddriver.com/article.asp?section_id '&article_id#34&page_n umber=1
BTJustice

and
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admit
http://www.caranddriver.com/article.asp?section_id '&article_id#34&page_n
The steam thing I could see, different people have different interpretations of steam. I knew what you were talking about when you mentioned it because that's most likely the first word I'd think of. If you have a problem though Ian'll probably try to help you out. Haven't looked at the other thread yet. I think I've read that article when I was looking into the differences between Dex-Cool and the green stuff that causes, it looked familiar.
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Look at the thread I created; "G-05 Coolant As A DEX-COOL Replacement"
BTJustice

interpretations
though
yet.
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You started out with a lot of good facts and recommendations about DexCool.
Now you're just off in left field and losing more credibility every time you post. Water EXPANDS as it warms, and that happens well before it actually boils, and that's the point that everyone you've now called names has been trying to point out.
Now, what you are probably thinking about is that in a closed cooling system at, say, 15 PSI and 210 degree thermostat temperature, there may be localized hot-spots inside the cylinder heads that see "microboiling" under heavy load conditions. The tiny vapor bubbles formed in those areas immedately re-condense into the bulk coolant so the radiator doesn't "boil over" or vent excessively, but micro-boiling does happen. Sometimes with disastrous consequences- Ford had a lot of trouble with early 5.4L v8 cylinder heads where micro-boiling would actually erode metal away (cavitation damage) until the wear perforated a combustion chamber.
Buford T. Justice wrote:

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DexCool.
Thank you. I appreciate that.

No has ever accused me of being on the left, lol. I still to this day remember a science class I took, probably high school, where the science teacher explained that water is the only known liquid in the universe that expands when it cools / freezes and contracts when it warms / boils. An extremely great example are the highways. As water works it way into the crevices of the pavement and then freeze, they crack. I also remember a story (my facts may be a little hazy) that some kid got a lot of money for winning a government sponsored contest. Some small country has a surplus of explosive cannon balls. The kid figured that if water was put into them and then froze, the cannon balls would break in half, have the powder frozen in the ice, and the government could use the iron. Pretty smart kid.
I think the original problem was when I put in the term "steam" into one of the posts. I damn near wish I had never done that.

Is micro-boiling the same thing that happens when coolant causes cativation inside a water pump?
BTJustice
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Buford T. Justice wrote:
. I still to this day

That is ONLY true in a narrow band of temperatures around the freezing point of water. From about 2-3 degrees C on upward, water expands with increasing temperature, just like everything else. From about -3C on downward, ice contracts with decreasing temperature, just like everything else.
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Buford T. Justice wrote:

Not quite, but they're related and the effects are almost identical.
Cavitation damage occurs anytime a void (bubble) surrounded by a liquid collapses violently, producing a pressure pulse that can damage metal.
In micro-boiling, the "bubbles" are caused by water flashing to steam and they collapse violently when they migrate into cooler water and the steam re-condesnes almost instantly. This is the "hissing" sound you hear when you heat a pan of water on the stove BEFORE it begins to boil visibly.
In a water pump, the bubbles aren't caused by true "boiling", but are actually caused by the process of cavitation (local reduction in ambient pressure to a point below the vapor pressure of the fluid) caused by the motion of the impeller blades. But when the bubbles collapse, the pressure pulses still erode metal.
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Thanks for the information in this and the post 5 minutes before. Good information.
BTJustice

cativation
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