Dex coolant

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2-ethylhexylacetate is an oil soluble liquid. It is not, I believe, used in DexCool It is a solvent and would have a limited application as a plasticizer. We used to use it to dissolve very special compounds which wouldnt dissolve in much of anything else. It would certainly damage elastomeric seals, etc, if it were used in DexCool. It wouldn't be soluble in water.
I suspect your 2-EHA may be 2-ethylhexanoic acid .It IS one of the Organic Acids which is patented to use in OAT technology. It would be used as the neutralized salt, not the acid form.
Common plasticizers are usually things like 2-ethylhexyladipate or di-2-ethylhexylphthalate.These are added to plastics (like dashboards, etc) to keep them soft and pliant. When they cook out of the elastomer, this is that oily film you see on the inside of the windshield.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.nix wrote:

There are numerous articles available which talk about the 2-EHA issue, such as this one in Motor magazine.
http://gates.com/downloads/download_common.cfm?file=MOTORCoolantFeature.pdf&folder=brochure
John
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wrote:

http://gates.com/downloads/download_common.cfm?file=MOTORCoolantFeature.pdf&folder=brochure
Good article, thanks. If Ford, Honda, Toyota and Chrysler have all seemingly documented problems they found when testing DexCool and causing gasket failure problems in their engines (and GM seemingly having more than their fair share of gasket problems), do you think GM is looking at DexCool as part of the equation?
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wonder if gm will send me the $1035.00 I had to pay to replace the gasket in my Impalla 2000. the dex-coolant was leaking into the oil...
On Tue, 22 Nov 2005 19:45:55 -0500, "James C. Reeves"

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Jake wrote:

This seems to be a design problem with the 3.4l family of V-6 engines more than a Dexcool problem. Whatever it is, you have a right to be furious with GM since whatever the problem is, they caused it.
Millions of 3.4l V-6 engine owners have joined the never-another-GM-product club.
John
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Same here, never again... not even as a gift.. The sooner GM files for chapter 11 bankruptcy the better.
the quality of their auto products are pathetic. Now I figure GM is finally getting what it deserves...
wrote:

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http://gates.com/downloads/download_common.cfm?file=MOTORCoolantFeature.pdf & folder=brochure
Of course there are... And in my previous posts I have mentioned some of the problems with an all purpose inhibitor for these types of systems.
A 'science writer' apparently wrote this article. While I am no fan of DexCool, there are some chemical inaccuracies....And, the science is very complicated, even for the professional in these areas.
2-ethylhexyl acid, alone, is not normally used as a plasticizer. Its esters may be, but it is not a premier application. As the sodium or potassium salt, 2-EH acid is a 'soap'. Totally water soluble, and not likely to attack elastomers.
The problem is more complicated than can be explained by trying to incriminate one single component.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.nix wrote:

OK, chill out. The spirit of my original response is this: Even though other makers are starting to use OAT technology for their vehicle coolants, they are not using the same formula as Dexcool and have objected strongly to the use of Dexcool in their non-GM vehicles.
I was responding to a post which implied that all the automakers are going to a Dexcool style coolant, which is not the case.
Personally I was surprised to find brown sludge in the coolant recovery bottle of our Olds minivan when it was still less than two years old and under 20,000 miles of moderate weather use (No. California). Something GM did with that vehicle was certainly less than optimum. I flushed everything out, bought a new Stant radiator cap (GM is recommending the aftermarket Stant instead of the original AC-Delco part!) and refilled with Prestone's version of Dexcool. So far at 60,000 miles it hasn't sludged up again. Luckily I maintain our vehicles carefully and noticed the brown goo in the coolant recovery tank. Most people would believe the five year service interval and never give it a close look!
John
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That is NOT what I posted, please go back and reread from the post where Mr. Reeves erroneously states that other manufacturers are still using "green" coolant (they aren't).
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wrote:

I wonder how many formulas we need. It seems to have gotten overly complicated for the average owner to deal with. One has to ask how and why.
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As many as there are different requirements set forth by the OEMs.

You should try it from a shop owners perspective.

(Q) How? (A) Buy from the OEM, then you'll be assured that it meets their requirements.
(Q) Why? (A) Smaller, lighter, more exotic alloys, higher output per liter, smaller cooling systems, increased maintenance intervals, etc, etc, etc.
I put GO-5 in my 95 Dakota 22 months ago, no problems so far...
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James C. Reeves wrote:

Many of the automakers seem hell bent on specifying custom fluids for their vehicles. VW, for example, has a mind-numbing set of custom specification for motor oils for their various vehicles. At least they have an approval process which third parties can go through. Why they can't engineer their vehicles to work well with the common European oil specs (A3, B3, etc.) is a mystery.
G-05 coolant seems to be the closest thing to an emerging new standard as it is approved by Daimler-Chrysler and Ford for worldwide use.
Traditionally, GM was a leader in lubricant standardization with Dexron from transmissions and a highly active involvement in the API standards setting process for motor oils. The latest SM/GF-4 specifications for motor oils are the current result of this process and are still called for by most US market vehicles .... except for the Germans. German auto makers seem to love special oil approvals.
Honda has it's own unique auto tranny fluid which is only sold at dealers. They also have a unique Power Steering fluid and claim that only Honda brand anti-freeze will do for the cooling system.
All of this has also led the aftermarket to come out with dubious products and dubious claims like all purpose automatic transmission fluid and all-vehicle coolants. Frankly I do not believe these claims, even when made by respected brands like Pennzoil and Prestone.
Somewhere along the line the keep-it-simple mantra has been forgotten!
John
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I definitely agree with you on some issues. GM has done a shitteaux job on a lot of things in the last few years, DexCool being one of them. They have so many different engine issues that it is hard to keep control of them.
I just had to replace the plenum on our 3800 Gen II, and am pissed.. Sorry assed engineering, worse customer support.
We are near to the point to buy a new car and I am caught with few alternatives. I cannot support crappola GM product development with more money down the drain. And I consider Ford a four letter word.
I dont want any more shi**ing computer modules, or engines that fall apart, or gaskets that leak, or plastic plenums that decompose, etc.
I want a quiet and economical car that is comfortable on the road. I dont want to have to pay $2-3000 for a dammittohell transmission overhaul before I get 100k on it. Nor do I want 48 microprocessors integrated into everything including the sunvisors, vents, etc. I dont want any more leaking air conditioning compressors, or weak sister alternators.
Just a simple quiet smooth running car.
And if GM cant do it, they can close every factory in the whole world and go fishing as far as I am concerned.
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And you win one of GM's computer controlled speed sensitive auto volume control radios for the great suggestion to make things simple.
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wrote:

I have experienced the same on a buick century. Also found a very thick layer of sludge in the opening of the radiatorcap. nast y stuff if you ask me. I'll take the green stuff thank you. This car was 2 years old. average miles. amazing

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