Diesel ...NO Manifolds?

http://www.sae.org/automag/technewsletter/080108Tech/01.htm
bob

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bob urz turned on the Etch-A-Sketch and wrote:

I was reading about that in Diesel Power a few months back. It is one of the (many) space saving designs they used.
Still not quite sure why they made it a 4.5L V8 instead of a 4.5L I4, V6 or I6. That would have saved more money and design issues.
Someday, maybe I'll pop one of those in my Avalanche if the 5.3L gasser gives up the ghost.
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Seems like semantics to me. Call something by another name! Even the picture shows what sure appear to be manifolds. From the writeup, indeed it sounds like the exhaust manifold design is simpler, and depending on how you partition parts and functions, the exhaust manifold may be part of another part or assembly. But to say the engine has no manifolds seems like a lot of hyperbole to me.
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wrote:

Interesting, but I would hope this design, if ever produced, is thoroughly application tested before being put into service. Better than even chances that some ugly faults may raise their snaky heads on something like this...not, however, new to GM engines.
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I'm sure they were planning on skipping that part. Thank goodness you came along to call them on it. Steve B.
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wrote:

Dont like my astute analysis of the situation, Steve> ;>)
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It has both intake and exhaust manifolds- the intake manifold is part of the valve cover, the exhaust manifold sits in the valley and connects directly to the turbo.
Dave
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On May 12, 12:03 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

This thread reminds me of the car ads when Olds sold their diesel. The ads claimed the engine was simpler, since there was no carburetor. Never mind that the fuel injection system was much more complex than carburetors of that era.
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news:cc977578-

We Americans have come to expect and savour small lies.
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bob urz wrote:

I've been wondering how long it would take before a manufacturer built an automotive diesel v8 this way. Its been the norm in locomotive engines for decades- both the EMD 2-strokes and the GE FDL 4-stroke locomotive diesels have the exhaust in the "valley". On the GE, the intakes are "logs" along the outside where car v-type engines would have exhaust manifolds, and on the EMD 2-strokes the intake is through the cylinder case. Caterpillar marine diesels are laid out the same way- exhaust and turbos in the "V", intake trunks along the outside of the "V".
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