Disabling ABS on my Van

Page 1 of 4  
I was wondering how I could disable the ABS system in my 2000 Montana, It doesnt have a fuse under the hood like our 99 jimmy does or I would just
unplug it. Any Suggestions?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wait a few months, it will disable itself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
yeah after the snow is gone!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
meh....
Couple of things:
Check with the applicable laws. It may be illegal for you to disable your ABS.
Check with your insurance company.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I just dont feel safe when the ABS activates, because it doesnt allow me full control over the brakes on snow. You hit the peddal and nothing happens, but buzzz.buzzz,buzzz and you keep going.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, it keeps going and you can even steer since the wheels don't lock up. Why not learn how easily it works and helps most drivers to maintain control?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you dont freak out and cram the old brakes then in my opinion they work much better than ABS do, thats my opinion and you are entitled to yours, I personally have ALWAYS disabled the ABS and have better stopping luck because I have FULL control over the wheels.
Just remember that when someone slides through a stop sign in the winter and hits you, when they get out claiming "I hit the brakes and nothing happened", than blame the ABS because they couldnt get stopped.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No need to start a pissing match, however, how well a piece of equipment operates is not a matter of opinion. It's usually determined by analytical testing.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I have driven vehicles where the ABS would dramatically LENGTHEN stopping distances in poor weather. Especially dangerous when I'd switch back and forth between identical vehicles, except one didn't have ABS and one did.
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

http://www.iihs.org/news/1996/iihs_news_121096.pdf http://www.iihs.org/research/advisories/iihs_advisory_17.pdf http://www.iihs.org/research/qanda/antilock.html#4
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting, but the newest of these studies is 1994. I'd like to see something updated.
I like the statement in the first link that it does not reduce fatalities and no one knows why. Seems to me, most fatalities are at higher speeds, head on collisions, cars going into a tree because the drunk passed out at 80 mph. No safety braking device will help in a situation like that.
As you can see from the second study, a big reduction in wet road crashes. That is where ABS works best.
NHTSA reported that compared with non-antilock-equipped cars, cars with antilocks
had about a 20 to 30 percent higher crash involvement rate in single-vehicle,
run-off-road crashes, but about a 15 to 25 percent reduced risk of multiple-vehicle
collisions on wet roads. For both wet and dry road conditions, the risk of fatal collisions
with pedestrians and bicyclists was reduced by 27 percent in cars with antilock
brakes. The net effects were nonsignificant reductions in fatal crashes (2 percent)
and nonfatal crashes (3 percent).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

It is odd that the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) doesn't have anything posted that is more recent...unless there isn't much change over the years.
My guess is (and it's only a guess), if one tends to be a "brake masher" in panic situations, the ABS would probably be a better choice for them. If one has learned and has driven knowing how to manually control skids, standard brakes would probably be best for those people (the ABS just "gets in the way" of what comes naturally to those people).
I have both types of vehicles and have been driving for 35 years. I've never experienced prolonged wheel lock or a steering or control problem in wet or snow conditions. But then I don't mash the brakes either.
Heck, one time back in the 1970's, there were a dozen cars in front of me sliding and spinning around back and forth across three lanes and into each other on a snow-covered New Hampshire Avenue (in Maryland)...I never even touched the brakes (I knew that wouldn't do any good)...I just steered around the mayhem. I was one of only a few that made it out the other side unscathed (I still don't know how).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

You're not "in control" if the damned thing doesn't stop! I don't know about a Montana but the ABS on late 80's Dodge full sized vans was freaking dangerous. Personally I don't think that such an awful system should have been allowed on the roads, it was that bad. Even a pitifully incompetent driver could have stopped faster on snow or patchy ice without the ABS than anyone could with the ABS.
Unfortunately, I can't offer any advice to the OP; I have no idea what kind of system he has or even if it's a good idea to disable it (sometimes proportioning is handled through the ABS controller so disabling the ABS will make the vehicle tail happy under braking.)
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Would you rather not be able to stop and slide or would you rather be not able to stop but still have steering?
I've never driven a Dodge with ABS so I don't know it your problem is common or not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

I can do both - stop and steer with my non-ABS vehicles.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I can stop and steer just fine without ABS.
nate
--
replace "fly" with "com" to reply.
http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nate Nagel wrote:

35+ years behind the wheel and I don't have a problem doing both with standard brakes either.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't know about Dodge, but I own 2 cars with ABS and I've locked all 4 wheels in both cars on ice or sleet and one time almost slid through an intersection. I resorted to manual pumping the brakes, ABS must be able for at least one wheel to have traction in order to cycle. Roy
wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you pump the brake peddle on an ABS car, that disables the system, so you are back to manual braking as long as you are pumping the peddle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.