Distilled Water - for Changing Coolent ???.

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I'm pretty sure you can get pre-mixed antifreeze.
wrote:


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The only question is how many bottles do you want to buy at a time? Make your own pre mix. Thats what I do and I keep a bottle in my trunk. If you keep adding 100% coolant to the system you will have problems.
snipped-for-privacy@levyclan.nospam.us says...

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Most vehicle manufacturers recommend antifreeze concentration levels of between 40% and 60% (with the optimum level of 50/50). Check your owners manual for proper levels. Part of the reason is because sensors are calibrated to these ranges of concentration. Topping off the coolant straight from the antifreeze container is ok.
Dave S(Texas)
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Hi Dave,
Thanks for your message, yes, I was referring to just topping off the coolant level. When doing the mix, am I supposed to pour the water and coolant into a container, mix them well and pour into the coolant tank?
Hopefully I don't need to do this anymore as I just had the car fixed from the famous gasket leaking problem.
Thanks again,
Simon

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I've used tap water in my cars for year and year and year ... always works for me.

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Ever heard of stories of mechanics finding tad poles in radiators? Usually thats from someone overheating and scooping water out of a creek but basically it comes down to how clean your drinking water is. If you live in the city and have city water then sure you could probably get by on tap water. If you have water that comes out of the ground then dont be getting it straight out of the tap! Sulfur, lime, and a number of other minirals are in the water depending on where you live. In cases like that a water purifier using carbon filtration will take out those minirals. (Thats how I do it.) So in other words dont be telling people to use straight tap water. You dont know what the hell their water is like so dont assume its clean. When you introduce unclean water into the system it just takes out a great deal of the corrosion inhibitors. Its better to spend a few bucks for clean water than to chance ruining your cooling system.

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I just told what works for me.

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clevere wrote:

Tap water where I am will eat all the car parts that it gets on/in. Count on a new heater core every 2-3 years. Radiators last somewhat longer. In homes here, hot water galvenized water pipes usually start leaking around 12-15 years - completely eaten through. Nasty stuff, tap water.
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First off, this engine is an Aluminum block engine.
GM recommends the engine be flushed with ordinary water, and when new anti-freeze is being installed, the water/anti-freeze be mixed to obtain a -35F to -45F protection level. Being that you have very hard water in Las Vagas, I'd use the distilled water or at least some 'treated' water. Do not forget the sealant tabs in the new coolant, lest you be buying a new engine before too long. Following the cooling system mainenance schedule for this engine is _very_ important.....flush/change every two years and add sealant tabs each time.
Most all problems with this series engine stem from owners not following the cooling system maintenance schedule and/or not using the GM sealant. The tabs are less than $5 and there are no other sealants that are recognized for this series engine(4.1L or 4.5L)
I'd also use distilled water in the wet-cell battery and even in the windshield washer system! 'Hard' water isn't a good thing, for most everything!
Dave S(Texas)
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An aluminum block in a 86 caddy?!! I guess I don't know jack...
First off, this engine is an Aluminum block engine.
GM recommends the engine be flushed with ordinary water, and when new anti-freeze is being installed, the water/anti-freeze be mixed to obtain a -35F to -45F protection level. Being that you have very hard water in Las Vagas, I'd use the distilled water or at least some 'treated' water. Do not forget the sealant tabs in the new coolant, lest you be buying a new engine before too long. Following the cooling system mainenance schedule for this engine is _very_ important.....flush/change every two years and add sealant tabs each time.
Most all problems with this series engine stem from owners not following the cooling system maintenance schedule and/or not using the GM sealant. The tabs are less than $5 and there are no other sealants that are recognized for this series engine(4.1L or 4.5L)
I'd also use distilled water in the wet-cell battery and even in the windshield washer system! 'Hard' water isn't a good thing, for most everything!
Dave S(Texas)
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