ecm temp sensor 2004 pontiac grand prix

Page 7 of 16  
Depends entirely on the code in question, the time differs for each. However, yes, it's true, in a lot of cases an intermittent fault will not set a trouble code.

--
Robert Hancock Saskatoon, SK, Canada
To email, remove "nospam" from snipped-for-privacy@nospamshaw.ca
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This is for NA 1994 Bonneville w/ 185k miles on it. Currently leaking oil.
I'm doing a head gasket change next week-end. If after removing everything connected to the head and removing the head bolts, do I need any tool to lift the head off?
Will the push rods stay or goes with the head?
Any info you guys can give, I would appreciate very much.
Thanks,
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

burnt out valve. I can tell you that no real special tools are needed, but a whole lot work & patience sure is! Just about everything has to either be disconnected or taken out of the engine compartment to get those darn heads off too! Plus, the old head bolts are NOT reuseable either!
As for common oil leaks, it's usually just the lower intake manifold or valve cover gaskets that leak oil though. The head gasket when fails usually leaks coolant.
--

Sincerely, Alan Ralston
--
GM Partsman for a Pontiac Dealership
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GMdude,
I have a service manual but this is the first time doing this and too much information is better than not enough.
Jim
GMdude wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have a Montana 2000 which I bought at an auction a year ago. I notice I was low on coolant in the reservoir. Then I opened the rad cap and it is full, but it has some kind of chunks floating in the coolant. There is a warning on the reservoir not to fill it with just any type of coolant. Can I add a bit or regular green/ yellow coolant or even some water? Any reason why I would want to flush the system. I have been told that the chucks could mean the rad had a leak before and sealer was added to seal the leak. Also the coolant really stinks, a real bad smell to it. Any advise. Should I add any coolant at all? There still is a little bit of coolant in the reservoir. And as far as I can tell, the van has never over heated before.
lbbs
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Go to a rad shop and get it power flushed , fill it and check for leaks. Replace rad , or solder if possible . Use whatever anti freeze you want.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Never mix green antifreeze with the pink stuff. Whatever you do, flush the system and replace the coolant with 50/50 mix of distilled water and regular green antifreeze. The pink stuff is causing problems in lots of cars.
Al
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My suggestion is to have the system flushed and refilled with Dexcool, which is what it left the factory with and what GM recommends. The vehicle was designed with Dexcool in mind - not the green stuff. In my opinion, Dexcool works just fine in vehicles designed for it, such as your Montana. Just keep a very close eye on the coolant level. Dexcool seems less tolerant of air in the system than the "green stuff". It is likely there was/is a leak in the system that was/needs to be repaired. Most complaints I've seen or heard about Dexcool fall under three categories:
1. Not maintaining proper coolant level, thus allowing air into the system. 2. Mixing other coolant types with Dexcool. 3. Using Dexcool in an engine not designed for it.
Roger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The "chucks" are tablets that come from the factory to help seal minor leaks. Dexcool does not have that same ability as the only green antifreeze. In fact if you take it to the dealer to have the system flushed, they will add more tablets to your cooling system.
Look around the water pump and intake gaskets for signs of antifreeze. That could be your leak. If you are going to get your system flushed, do not go to a dealership. Go to someone where they will not reinsert the tablets.
Hope this helps.
Tim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just siphon the gas out, then take the tank down with a floor jack. you have already wasted the time it takes to do it the right way...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I haven't really wasted time .. since I'm waiting on a new fuel pump :P

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Drove the van some more, now the Engine light is on again. What could cause an oxygen leak?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't know of any oxygen leak. You probably have a bad oxygen SENSOR which will need replacing. I just had to have mine replaced on 99 Venture at 33000 miles...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
To me it sounds like cylinder 6 is running lean. This would make for a very hot cylinder and could have melted off the electrodes from the spark plug. Possible causes: clogged injector, bad intake gasket (these engine are notorious for them), burnt valve. I would get this problem solved ASAP so you don't cause serious engine damage.
Which O2 sensor was showing the leak? You car does have more than one. IT has one before the converter and after. If it is the O2 before the converter check the exhaust gasket between the pipe and the manifold to make sure that it is not leaking. This will also cause a lean condition, and possibly a faulty O2 sensor reading.
Tim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
CONTINUATION: I asked the mechanic again what exactly did the scanner read. He said the left bank reading was lean. He also mentioned that cylinder 6 is miss firing (I assume that the left bank is cylinder 2,4, and 6). I replaced the 6th cylinder spark plug. And at first it seamed that starting the van was a lot easier. But next day engine light was back on and it takes about 5 tries before the ignition starts. Question can ignition problems have anything to with this lean reading. Can it be related to the miss firing problem? If so, If so difficulty starting especially in the mornings, does that give you a clue if it could have something to do with a bad sensor as opposed to miss firing problem? I would like to address the mostly likely problem first or the easiest solution first.
btw: I year ago I had sugar in the gas tank, so I had the tank replaced. And added some fuel injection cleaner in the gasoline. I have had no engine light

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ahhh, a lean condition, that makes more sense than a "O2 leak". Left bank is 1,3,5. A misfire on six should cause a rich condition on right bank which the computer could misinterpret as lean on the left. After having it fixed the light came on again.....that doesn't mean the same trouble code is reset. Could be something else this time. An injector sticking can cause a lean condition. GW
lbbs wrote:

-- GW - note incorrect email address
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My engine light is one so my mechanic scanned and found an oxygen leak in the exaust. What can cause that? for the full story read the following post.
I have a venture van 2000 and recently got an misfire code that was read at the mechanics shop. Also, scanner detected an O2 leek. The cleared the error message and (June 25th) I change the spark plug for that 6th cylinder. I notices the nipple circle on the top hook of the spark plug was totally gone. I checked a different plug and the nipple was fine on that one. Also to mention that we had problems starting the ignition on the first try (sometimes takes 5 tires). Now that I put a new spark plug it starts like a beauty. I had the engine light come up before (5 months ago) and mechanic found a O2 leak. But did not mention a miss fire problem. That time he cleared it and it was fine until a week ago. So now I want to figure out why I had this problem so it does not happen again. My warranty just ran out and will be selling the van this summer. I would appreciate any additional insight as to what the root cause of this problem. Could a miss fire cause O2 leak? Or did the o2 leak caused the miss fire, leading to worn out spark plug? I have about 50,000 km (about 30,000 miles). What do you think? Thanks.
I have driven it some more today and now the engine light is on again, after changing the spark plug.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If this is in the US, take it back to the dealer. The emissions warranty is over 36,000 mi (I think it is something like 80,000 mi). Not sure about other countries though. Look in your warranty materials.
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phil wrote:

You probably have an internal coolant leak inside your engine. The coolant is escaping into the combustion chamber or crankcase through cracks in the cylinder head or block, or through a leaky head gasket.
In rare instances, coolant may also leak into the automatic transmission fluid cooler if one is located inside the radiator. But usually when automatic transmission fluid leaks into the coolant it means the line is leaking.
Pressure testing the cooling system is necessary to diagnose an internal leak. A cylinder leak-down test can tell a mechanic if the coolant leak is in the combustion chamber. But to pinpoint an internal leak, it is usually necessary to remove the head(s) from the engine. The head may then be pressure tested and/or checked for cracks using special equipment.
Minor internal leaks can sometimes be temporarily sealed by adding a sealer to the cooling system. But large leaks or ones that do not respond to a sealer will have to be fixed.
If the problem is a cracked head or block, repairs may or may not be possible depending on the nature of the crack. Cracks in aluminum can often be repaired by welding while those in cast iron can be fixed by pinning the damaged area. But some cracks may be so bad that they are beyond repair or in a location that makes repair impossible. In such cases, the head or block must be replaced.
If a leaky head gasket is the culprit, replacing the gasket may only temporarily cure the problem if the head or block is warped. The mating surfaces on both the head and block should be checked for flatness and resurfaced if necessary to restore flatness for a proper seal.
Hope this shed some light for you.
--
Regards
Dan.
00 VX SS 273 Rwkw of unforced mumbo.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks Dan ... I was also thinking along the same lines, leakage into the engine / combustion chambers ... but I always thought that would lead to visible "smoke" from the exhaust ... we're not seeing any of that either.
Having said that, do you still think most likely it's leaking inside the engine? I guess it must be if there's no other (outward) sign of loss, huh?
Thanks ... Phil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.