Emptying a Gas tank on a 1995 Oldsmobile 98

Emptying a Gas tank on a 1995 Oldsmobile 98 for some reason is proving to be quite difficult for me. How do I go about it. I've put a siphon hose down the fuel filler spout as I've done on other cars that
I've worked on but on this it won't seem to get down into the fluid (there's about 1.5' of hose that won't fit in). End of hose is dry, there's about 3/4's of a tank of fuel that I'd rather remove before trying to drop the tank
Suggestions/recommendations?
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If this is fuel injection which I assume it is, then just connect an overflow tube to the fuel rail and turn on the car, the fuel pump should empty the tank.
Ted
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email name wrote:

I assume you are dropping the tank to access the fuel pump? (And not just for the fun of it.) YOu may have to do it the hard way and drop it 3/4 full. A filler hose or tank typically has anti-siphon baffles. See if the filler hose comes off near the tank. I have used a floor jack - it works, but a trans jack is better.
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On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 05:24:54 GMT, " Paul " <" stayp_at_notsuoh_rr_moc "@.> wrote:

You are correct. So it looks like I'll be in for a gasoline shower :(
Thanks guys.
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Don't do that. Just pull one of the fuel lines off the engine, and run another one to a bucket.. then turn the key on.
wrote:

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clevere wrote:

How does that work without the engine running?
Ian
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I would assume the pump keeps pumping if it can't build pressure. This is of course an assumption on my part, and may be completely incorrect.

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clevere wrote:

Other then the standard two second prime...the computer has to see evidence that the engine is running....or no fuel pump. Your method does work, but we have to use the scan tool to force the pump to run. Or.....some years/models have a direct "prime" wire that you can put 12 volts to and it bypasses the computer controlled relay and turns the fuel pump on.
Ian
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email name wrote:

I'm not so sure you'll get a gas shower... When I fixed the lines on top of the gas tank on my 88 cavalier (pos, I know) it had about 1/2 tank. I couldn't siphon it, as you can't, but before I replaced the tank, I figured I would dump the gas into a pail straight from the tank. With tank in hand, I tilted it, flipped it on it's side, upside down, etc. but not a drop of gas came out... That is one helluva anti-siphon baffle! lol
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wrote:

I just out a floor jack under the tank with plywood between it and the tank. Let it down a bit and disconnect stuff as you can get to it.
Al
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This works on older carbureted cars (single line external pump) and should work on newer cars. Put a hose on the fuel lines and into a gas can. Find a rubber ball that will seal over the filler spout. Run an air line through the ball. Set the pressure regulator to 5 PSI on your air compressor. pressurize the tank until the gas starts to flow. If the car is on blocks, siphon will take care of the rest. Be careful not to over fill the can.

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