Fixing P0113 Intake air sensor high voltage

I have a P0113 that I am trying to fix. I replaced the sensor first since it was easy and cheap. The sensor looked fine and unfortunately the check engine light hasn't cleared after 2 weeks (which should be
ample time). I replaced the air filter shortly before the problem started, so I wouldn't be surprised if its caused by a bad wire or connection. I have the factory repair manual, which has instructions for troubleshooting this code, however I don't find them all that helpful. I've determined one of the contacts has a good ground and thats as far I've gotten. If I determine the other wire is shorted or is open, how would I go about fixing this? (I do plan on stopping at Autozone to verify that I'm still experiencing same fault and to have them reset it, before investing too much more time) Thanks for any pointers anybody can give me.
As a side note, can anybody recommend a good scan tool, or a good site for researching my options?
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The correct way is to reset the code and see if it comes back. You can look at the circuit with a scan tool. Follow the instructions in the repair manual closely. In the process look for places in the cable chewed by rats, a very common problem. Do a google search on OBDII scan tools as there are a lot out there. Just about all in the consumer price range are about the same. Compare the specs on any you might want. Asking that question here will just get you an answer from everyone that the one they have is the best........

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if you are determined to chase obd2 codes yourself, first buy a good scanner that has DATA STREAMING so you can see the info in real time and make diagnostics with real info. not just some guy at auto shack giving you a number to chase around..............the money you save from replacing good parts will end up paying for a $150 scanner in no time........kjun
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The PO113 code is described as: Intake Air Temperature Sensor Circuit High Input. Meaning the the computer is reading a low resistance. Here is a hook the I learned about temperature sensors: ("Temperature sensors are like women." "When women are cold, they have high resistance." "When women are hot, they have low resistance"). Here's what could be going on. You could have a bad IAT sensor, which you already replaced, a bad internal resistor in the computer, or an open in the Feed(Power) wire, or Ground wire. We can eliminate the sensor, and the Ground, assuming you checked the ground correctly as stated. What about the Feed wire at the connector? did you get power. I would recommend using a Voltmeter because the test lamp can damage the circuit going to the PCM because the PCM regulates most sensor voltages to 5 Volts. A check with the Voltmeter would be disconnect the sensor from the harness, and connect the positive lead of the voltmeter to the sensor feed wire, and the negative lead to the ground wire of the connector with the sensor off and the Key in the On position not Run. the reading on the Voltmeter should be close to 5 Volts. if you get this then the wiring and the PCM is providing a good signal. If you get nothing the you have and Open in the Feed side assuming that the ground is good. If you get more than this than the PCM's internal resistor is shorted. Hope this helps.
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On Apr 7, 2:36 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Thanks for your help. I measured 0 volts. I'm confident of my measurement of a good ground. Assuming my PCM is fine and the problem is in the feed wire, how would I go about fixing it? BTW I guess I forgot to mention this is a 2000 Chevrolet Malibu.
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wrote:

Something is not adding up. I'm having a hard time with a guy who asks how to fix a bad wire, but also says he's confident in his measurement of a good ground.
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What I don't understand is how somebody who thinks using a multimeter to test for continuity between a supposed ground and a known good ground is complicated figured out how to post in a newsgroup.
I was just trying to break my habit of being overly verbose. The wire is closed in a large wiring harness that snakes all through the engine compartment. I understand that I can open up the whole wiring harness, and inspect the whole length of the wire, and failing to find any apparent damage attempt to find the open by wiggling the wire and looking for voltage or measuring continuity (between both ends of the open wire, I have to make sure I explain everything in case somebody thinks I don't know what I'm doing). If I'm lucky enough to pinpoint where the open is I can splice in a good wire. Alternatively I can just save myself the effort and replace the whole length of wire. Or some might suggest replacing the whole harness, since in their experience they've found that one bad wire indicates that others could fail soon and its time and cost effective over replacing one wire at a time. Or somebody may recommend that replacing the connector is a good place to start from their experience. Or maybe the best solution I haven't even thought of yet. However instead of wasting my time by typing all of that, and the time of anybody kind enough to read it, I chose to just ask "how would I go about fixing it", which really meant "how would you (assuming you won't answer unless you have some knowledge or experience) go about fixing it".
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Posting in a newsgroup is easy. Trying to figure out what a person's capabilities are when they ask an open question like "how do I fix it", is something quite different. Maybe instead of trying to be a wise ass, you'd take the time to make your posts consistent. On one hand you indicate you have no knowledge (how do I fix it?) and on the other you want people to have a confidence in your previous troubleshooting. You're either competent or you're not. You have to be the one who clues people in on your competence. The advice that you're ultimately given is going to be largely based on that.

Wow. All of that, and it looks a lot different from what you originally posted. You have to remember - most of us don't use our crystal balls on the weekend, so we have no idea what thoughts run underneath of the words you post. We simply go by the words you post. If you want a fair understanding of your words, then you have to make them understandable.
As to your problem - I know of no known problems with looms that you should be aware of. If you have a broken wire, then the fundamental troubleshooting approaches of tracing it, and ohming it across its length are your best starting point. Fix any discovered breaks.
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Sorry for the attitude I just felt like you were giving me a hard time so I decided to have some fun with it. I still haven't had a chance to look at this problem any further. Thanks for everybody's help!
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In article

So how did you test the circuit?
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TheClassic wrote:

Unplug the sensor. Clear the code. Same code koeo or low voltage code koeo?
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TheClassic wrote:

description came from a scanner I don't trust it.
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If it is a P0xxx code then the definition from the scanner should be correct, as that is a generic OBD-II code. A P1xxx code on the other hand is manufacturer specific and will need to be looked up in the service manual for the car in question.
Chris
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wrote:

Assuming this thread is still alive: to trace a wire in the harness, you can use a sharp-pointed meter probe to prick through the insulation at various points between the PCM and the sensor. If you can find something to support the wire while you prick it, it will be a lot easier on your fingers.
It's still a PITA, but that lets you (a) test where it's relatively easier to get at the harness, and (b) isolate the problem area. BTW, I had a bad wire on my Cavalier, where the harness was rubbing on an engine mount. OTOH, this car had had front end damage before I got it.
George
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I have a 2000 malibu and I have the same problem with the air intake sensor and was wonder if anyone had found out how to fix the problem they were having. I was thinking about replacing the whole wire harness to fix the problem anyone know what i should do?
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Use a millimeter and trace it down to the wire that is failing and replace. OH, you are guessing it is the cable. Trace it to the failure. It is a simple circuit but could be anything from the sensor to the ECM. The value the ECM is seeing can be seen on an OBDII tester.

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