Fuel Saver Pro Device

On Sat, 8 Mar 2003 08:52:34 -0500, "RICH" wrote:


That's usually true but not always. For example, take a look at this stored hydraulic energy propulsion technology:
http://www.shepinc.com
An excerpt from their web site:
================= ... The SHEP (stored hydraulic energy propulsion) system captures energy used during braking and recycles the energy back into the vehicle at the time it needs it most; when accelerating from a dead stop.
This is the time at which the engine is performing least efficiently, burning the most fuel, and emitting the most pollutants.
During the braking process, formerly wasted energy is captured in hydraulic tanks attached to the vehicle's chassis. When the vehicle accelerates from a dead stop, the computer instructs the pump to apply the stored energy to the drive shaft. The vehicle moves forward without requiring the engine to do so.
Once the energy stored in the hydraulic system has been used up, the computer instructs the normal engine function to take over.
The next time the brakes are applied, the hydraulic tanks capture the wasted energy once again, and the process is repeated when accelerating.
The SHEP system is a hydraulic drive system that recovers vehicle braking energy, and returns it to the vehicle when it needs it most- when the vehicle is at a stop...
================= To me, this makes sense. Think about the following:
If a car weighs 1000 kg and accelerates to 60 mph (27 m/sec), the force required is about 365,000 joules of kinetic energy.
At 100% efficiency one gallon of gas contains the energy about 350 such acceleration cycles but of course no vehicle is anywhere near 100% efficient. With current technology, 10% efficiency is more like it.
Stored hydraulic energy propulsion, if successful in recycling 70% of the 365,000 joules of energy referred to above would imply 255,500 joules saved per 0-60MPH vehicle acceleration cycle.
A gallon of gas contains 132 million joules of energy, or the equivalent of the energy saved in 517 vehicle acceleration cycles.
132,000,000 / 255,500 = 517
So how many 1000kg 0-60MPH vehicle acceleration cycles occur every day? Just in the US, there are over 200 million vehicles. Let's conservatively suppose that one quarter of them are used daily and experience two dozen (24) 0-60MPH acceleration cycles. That means:
(200M vehicles / 4) * (24 a.c.) = 1.2B acceleration cycles
1.2B accel. cycles / 517 = 2,321,083 gallons of gas saved per day
Obviously you can slice and dice this many ways. We haven't factored in the capital cost of Stored hydraulic energy propulsion system either, and with gas under $2 gallon in most areas of the USA maybe it doesn't yet pay. Maybe it would with $5 gallon gas. Or maybe it would in a commercial application like buses or trucks. I dunno.
A variety of assumptions can be applied, but the main point is that there ARE things that can be done to improve vehicle efficiency that aren't yet being done and just because automobile manufacturer's aren't doing them yet doesn't necessarily mean they're not possible or not feasible. Usually these "miracle" gas mileage increasing things are gimmicks. But not always.
FH
P.S. I don't work for SHEP, own any of their stock or have any affiliation with them whatsoever.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
fantastic snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (sam) pontificated in

I came up with this brilliant idea for a torsionally charged polymeric stored energy device to power cars. Couldn't get any investor interest. :^(
--
TeGGeR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Aren't those common is small aircraft? :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@scvnet.com wrote:

it sounds all too familiar to the government lingo to explain why a hammer costs $20,000 (they call it an "interfibrous friction fastening device") and perhaps the toilet seat ($30,000) could be called a "gleuteous support facilitator" but i'm not sure on that one.
BTW tegger, you can buy such a device already, marketed as a volkswagen engine rebuild kit. :) i suppose two could be the turbo model?
--
Ben Jerew
ASE Master Technician
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Get four and it can be the AWD model.
--
TeGGeR

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6 Oct 2003 09:22:01 -0700, fantastic snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (sam) wrote:

Within practicality.
The Fuel Saver Pro, and other such gadgets are inexpensive enough so as to make the impact on the sticker price minute.
--- Rich http://richlockyer.tripod.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Last Time I checked, hydraulics couldnt store energy as the oil wont compress.. Just can push stuff like a steel rod would. You need something to push the rod or Oil like "air pressure". I see no mention of air pressure storing the energy though. The pictures just show oil being pumped in a tank so it must be just air pressure pushing it back. Must some serious pressure to move a loaded garbage truck.
wrote:

is
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Actually hydraulic accumulators have been around for many years!!! Think of a cylinder with a pre-charged air bladder. The hydraulic fluid pushes against the bladder filling up the volume and compressing the air - at pressure. Similar to your water storage tank if you run a well for drinking water.
wrote:

take
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Oct 2003 01:33:57 GMT, someone who calls themselves

Simple enough to do with a Hydraulic Accumulator - a high-pressure steel tank with either a bladder or a sliding divider piston inside, and a high pressure nitrogen charge. Send in hydraulic fluid, the bladder expands and the nitrogen compresses, storing energy. To reverse, open the valve and capture the energy stored in the nitrogen.
Go look at the Hydac International website if you want to see what they are - I typed in www.hydac.com and got sent to http://212.88.134.40/index_start.php so start there and save yourself a step. Or go look at the back of any modern concrete pump truck, they are used in the operating systems.
--<< Bruce >>--
--
Bruce L. Bergman, POB 394, Woodland Hills CA 91365, USA
Electrician, Westend Electric (#726700) Agoura, CA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.