Full size Chevys & GMC trucks door hinge pins.

What kind of junk are they building these trucks out of anyway? I have a 98 full size Chevy truck that has only 62K on it and the dam thing is falling
apart.Both of the inside door handles broke already.Now the doors hang up or drag striker post.I've been told the pins wear out quite offten. What ever happened to things that would last as long as the vehicle? Do any of you people out there have any ideas on a quick & safe way to replace these hinge pins. Without causing damage to the door or myself?
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Replacing hinge pins should be a very easy job. I've done it before , a no brainer I seem to recall. Good luck.
On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:15:57 -0500, "runamuck"

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The manual says keep all doors and working parts well greased every three to four months. This is a must to insure longevity.
wrote:

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Should be, but is not necessarily easy. Tried to do it on my father-in-law's GM Sonoma. On that one, the hinge plates are welded to the door and to the frame and the pin holds them together. No bolts, no adjustment, nada. The pin nestles under the hinge spring, which apparently has to come out... out is easy, in not so easy.
I ended up taking it to a body shop They had the tools and finished it in about a half hour.
But it didn't help much. Wind still whistles around the molding. At least the door will open and shut now.
It is truly a shitty setup. Keep em greased and you may avoid having to change them.
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1998 Jimmy 120,000 miles You are lucky so far. Why do I keep saying I will only buy GM
replace all door bushings and I lubed them with every oil change. trip around seats is broken and falls off reclining lever on passenger seat broke. parking break lever broke rear hatch push button broke rear defroster connection to window broke transmission had to be rebuilt alternator had to be replaced both front wheel bearing hubs had to be replaced air conditioner pump had to be replaced drivers leather seat shows really bad wear key switch had to be replaced wiper switch had to be replaced front wiper motor had to be replaced rear wiper motor had to be replaced

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It sounds like you are very hard on your truck.

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Its a SUV I have used it for going to a from work. I have taken a few trips around looking for work and now with being disobliged for the past 14 months about all I do to take and pick up grand kids from school. It has not been abused if anything its been babied. What could I of done to cause all the electrical devices to fail. I forgot to put in the window motor that I replaced. This SUV has the worse electrical system of any car I have had. The seat wear prematurely. They are known for transmission problems. Nothing I did or could of done to prevent these for happening.
Only thing that we did or should I say the kids did was step on the seat recliner lever and break it off.

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Well, Tim and Linda, there are better and worse SUV's, and most of them have two big detractors:(1) they gobble gasoline, and (2) they have rather poor rollover histories.
Some, GM's included or especially, are pieces of crap.
My stepdaughter just bought a Honda Pilot. Nice car, but DARN expensive. Crappola for gas mileage. She had this car in her heart, not in her mind, when she purchased.
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Actually, I was referring to all the plastic you mentioned was broke. I have never owned a Jimmy/Blazer, but my step-brother drives a newer 2-door Jimmy and loves it to death. I was even tempted to buy one when I bought my last car, but they seemed to small to me.

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My daughter also has a 98 Jimmy. I would NEVER recommend anyone to buy one.

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Interesting. 2000 and lower were the model years I was looking at when I was thinking about buying one, as I could not afford a newer one. Like I said, my step-brother's is a 2000+, likely a 2002 I would imagine. Thanks for the info though.

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Daughters problems with her Jimmy have been electrical and transmission.

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I have a 2000 gmc jimmy havent had to many serious problems with it. But i feel its soon to come starting was a problem a while back would not start all the time would turn over and over but wouldnt start.
My door hinges suck 2 they sag and like he said on the sonoma that spring is in the way so i am not looking forward to doing that repair. the front end of the suv suspension wise is soon to haunt me. Partially my fault so i cant cry to much. It's just that those dag on jeeps think they can have all the fun lol
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Well thank all of you people that gave me advice on the door problem that I was having. I've been a mechanic or technician what ever you what to call us tradesmen now a days for over fourty years.I now know that the autos being produced in this here united states of America "SUCK!" and the manufactures have never had the technician or the owner in mind when they made a car or truck. The public is given plastic junk that won't even last until the damn thing is paid for. We have only ourselves to blame. We as consumers of the products being offered to us need to let the automobile manufactures know we want better quality that is affordable to all of the consumers of this great country. We must let them know how we feel or we will continue to be sold junk at outrageous prices with shortened life spans.
Sorry about the rant got on a roll there for a short time. Back to the stupid door on my Chevy 1500.Well after new pins & a inside door handle or two the door was even harder to open. So as a last resort I went to the GM body shop to ask even more questions about my door dragging shop foreman brought out a 8'long bar with a adjustable striker post on it & striker latch on the end. In about 3 1/2 minutes & what we in the business call a bend adjustment the door closed perfectly. The body shop foreman told me that over half the cars being produced by GM today encounter some kind of door closure problems with in a few months of purchase of a new vehicle. Now what does that tell us. Thanks again for your help.
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It tells me a few things;
1- If you had followed the advice you got 2 weeks ago, you could have saved yourself a trip to the bodyshop.
2- A 3 1/2 minute repair?.....seems pretty consumer friendly to me.
3- Either you or your body shop foreman is likely prone to exaggeration.
Glad you got it fixed.
Dave
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(It really sounds as if you have a truck that has been in a collision with the door hinges welded back improperly. It's not that critical a task to get it right when replacing; but one must have correct tools (jigs) and it really helps if he has watched/helped an expert do it. A 1st-class body shop in our area, with ~25 employees, uses one man to attach practically all doors which lack adjustment other than bending.) BTW:be sure & put the jack as far toward back end of door as possible; also have door as nearly closed as possible on 1st attempt(s). Then, as last resort, have it open at right angle to side of truck. Place jack, with like a 4X4 block of wood, against the horizontal under-door section--NOT against the pinched, vertical end-bottom portion. HTH & good luck. s
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At this point, it seems like bending is the next alternative to try. (It really sounds as if you have a truck that has been in a collision with the door hinges welded back improperly. It's not that critical a task to get it right when replacing; but one must have correct tools (jigs) and it really helps if he has watched/helped an expert do it. A 1st-class body shop in our area, with ~25 employees, uses one man to attach practically all doors which lack adjustment other than bending.) BTW:be sure & put the jack as far toward back end of door as possible; also have door as nearly closed as possible on 1st attempt(s). Then, as last resort, have it open at right angle to side of truck. Place jack, with like a 4X4 block of wood, against the horizontal under-door section--NOT against the pinched, vertical end-bottom portion. HTH & good luck. s
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