GM fires Mr. Goodwrench

GM fires Mr. Goodwrench http://tinyurl.com/26fs4jb
Auto repair brand will be sidelined to put more emphasis on four core product lines Christina Rogers / The Detroit News
General Motors Co. is killing its storied Goodwrench brand in the United States as it strives to strengthen its marketing focus around its four core brands, the company said Monday.
Goodwrench, a familiar name used by GM dealers to advertise maintenance and repairs for more than three decades, will be replaced with more brand-specific labels, such as Chevrolet Certified Service, Buick Certified Service, Cadillac Certified Service and GMC Certified Service, GM said.
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The Goodwrench brand will meet its end Feb. 1, 2011.
"Our No. 1 priority is providing a world-class ownership experience that creates positive long-lasting relationships with our customers," said Steve Hill, GM's vice president for customer care and after sales.
The move is the latest in a series of changes being led by GM's new U.S. marketing vice president Joel Ewanick as he seeks to give each of the four brands more marketing heft, helping them to better stand out from the parent company.
Having closed Pontiac, Hummer, Saab and Saturn during bankruptcy, the automaker also has more money to spend on promoting its four remaining brands and will use it to boost TV advertising in pricier spots, such as during the Super Bowl.
Dealers will be notified of the changes in a Web cast scheduled for Wednesday.
Mr. Goodwrench, as it was once known, was born in the mid-1970s to promote GM parts and service dealerships. The brand name also was a major sponsor of NASCAR racing. For years, it graced the exterior of Dale Earnhardt Jr.'s car.
"I'm sad to see him go," said Rick Alpern, general manager at Keyes Chevrolet in Van Nuys, Calif., of Mr. Goodwrench"But I think it's a bright move to separate out the General Motors label and give each brand more appeal."
This isn't the first time GM has dialed back on the Goodwrench name.
The automaker shelved the smiling Goodwrench character several years ago, hoping to find new ways to focus on the automaker's dealerships and services.
But Mr. Goodwrench made a comeback in 2003 in commercials featuring comedian Stephen Colbert.
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"I have tried to live my life so that my family would love me and my
friends respect me. The others can do whatever the hell they please."
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1st class clowns. Looks like I got the last laugh.
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He was overworked anyway.
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hls wrote:

:-) :-)
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He was clueless!

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On 09/11/2010 3:02 PM, hls wrote:

Guess so, my last, and I mean last EVER GM Regal was in the shop more than 5 times in the first year and it wasn't oil changes. Was a POC.
Looks like GM is going to try to fly like a turkey again.
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On 09/11/2010 7:01 AM, Jim_Higgins wrote:

What GM really means, is enough people realize they can't fix GM junk. Brand damage now outweighs keeping it.
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