GM Oil Life Sensor Troubleshooting

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Since many (if not most) of today's GM cars have a "black box".. it would be interesting to know if this info storage device keeps records of oil and operating conditions.
Do any of you Tech's know the answer?
Willy
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Willy wrote:

No. We are waiting patiently for more pearls of wisdom from you, Willy!
Ian
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needs to be changed every 3000 miles. Unless you have an older car, you can't possibly win that argument.
Willy
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Willy wrote:

You need to re-read my post and what I said the owners manual says. I didn't say what you are attributing to me. And I can win that argument even with a newer GM vehicle. Do you want to put money on that fact that there are some newer GM vehicles that have right in the maintenance schedule to change the oil at 3000 miles?
Ian
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No bet from me as you're correct.. Under extreme conditions, that could be the recommendation.
Willy
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Actually you may not have gone "long enough"... it depends on how you drive the car etc...
Here's an easy way to see if it's working. Get your owners manual and find out how to get a reading for "remaining oil life". You didn't say what model or year car you own. Once you have a reading, after you've driven for a couple of days, see if the reading has changed to a lesser amount. If it has, then your oil monitor is working correctly.
I find on my 04 Impala, which is driven almost exclusively on the highway at higher speeds, could EASLY go 14-15,000 miles between changes, although I always get it serviced before then.
Changing your oil without resetting your sensor will NOT result in it coming on sooner (although it will be sooner than it would if you didn't) as the sensor actually detects various chemical levels in your oil as part of the overall formula it uses to determine when it's time to change oil. So although based on engine revolutions alone it would be time to change, as part of the formula the system uses, if your oil is still in great shape (which it would be if you changed it)... the change oil light is still not going to appear.
Hope that helps.
Willy
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Willy wrote:

Which sensor would that be, Willy?

No, but your knowledge of this system needs some.
Ian
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Shiden... here's the problem (least I think so).
You and I are clearly referencing two different devices.
The oil sensing device currently in use on GM cars, and several others such as BMW, analyze the remaining additive commonly referred to as ZDP. The computer driven formula also keeps track of engine revolution, starts/stops, and a variety of other conditions.
This is clearly demonstrated when I compare the oil change frequency between my Impala and the Equinox. My Impala is driven 99% highway for long intervals. Although I never drive it until the oil light appears, I could easily go 12,000 miles without it making an appearance. The Equinox, which is driven 80% in slow congested driving with the average speed on a tank of gas being around 25mph... is at 30% oil life remaining at 3,000 miles.
There are several lengthy articles explaining the formula in detail on line if you'd care to search.
Willy
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Willy wrote:

Willy, you are so full of shit! Tell me "where" this oil sensing device is located on your Impala. Please give me and the rest of the boys at our dealership a good laugh!
Ian
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I think you raise a point which have been somewhat illuminated to me in the last 48 hours. While there ARE some cars that indeed actually monitor the condition of the oil, it appears that while GM wants to give you that impression, in reality it could be that it's all a computerized mathmatical formula based on a variety of conditions that the system monitors such as starts, stops, engine revolutions, just to name a few.
Now that you've peeked my interest, I'm investigating further as it appears I may have been grossly misinformed.
Willy
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There's no sensor, Willy. If you reread the post from the extremely helpful user, it's all algorithm based. As I recall, GM says OLM, or once a year, or at least every 12500 km.

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That could be true... and if so, I stand corrected. My point being that the change cycle is not dictated by mileage alone as many suggest.
Willy
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engine run time, etc. The system doesn't know if you've changed the oil, you have to tell it.
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Willy wrote:

Everything I have read published by GM and others says that the OLM reading is based on computed information, not chemical analysis of the actual oil in the vehicle.
John
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