GM Still Sells 1 out 4 of all Cars sold in the US

Page 1 of 3  
Allegiance, fear of change and the sizable investments these dealers have in GM products factor into their pledge to support a company that continues to
sell vehicles to one of every four people who buy cars or trucks in this country. Even as Toyota and Honda steadily gain market share, more customers buy from GM than from any other single manufacturer. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/04/16/AR2006041600 652.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Shoe Shine Boy wrote:

As you note, GM's market share is rapidly declining and they will soon be passed by Toyota on the world scene. Soon Toyota will be number 1 due to better planning and better engineering *and* better customer relations-GM really sucks there. Many, many bitter *former* customers of GM are, at long last, getting their revenge on GM.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Because of GM's weakened competitive state, "dealers can put as much or as little attention as they want on GM's products and that scares the daylights out of GM," which might explain why the automaker has begun listening more intently to its dealers and granting them more access to GM's top brass, Spinella said.
Wherever you look things are getting scary - the dealers - the unions - the customers - the retirees - the finance
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GM's CEO was on MSNBC Squawk Box this morning, bragging about how their good planning was turning things around, as evidenced by first quarter results.
'Turning things around', Waggoner, means making a car that the engine holds together, that the air conditions system holds up, that the electrical system doesn't go into meltdown, and that the tranny doesn't leave you walking prematurely.
You bought SAAB, and turned it into a POS, too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You should know by now that imports suck.
mike hunt
.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I never owned an imported SAAB.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So you live in Sweden, so, what? ;)
mike hunt

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Keeps them from being imports. Now, SAABs are built on some GM platforms, etc. One of them is a recase Isuzu.
Some of the original SAABs, and Volvos too for that matter, were pretty darn good cars. Some recent reports now drop them to below average reliability, I assume because of their Americanization.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That seems strange since both SAAB and Volvo sell far more vehicles, as part of GM an Ford, than they ever did on their own. Somebody must think they are good vehicles or they would not be buying so many of them.
mike hunt

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

part
SAAB never did have a very good marketing effort here in the USA. A few people recognized them for the quality that they were, but they were not attractive to the mainstream.
Volvo was a different story. They had a high profile as workhorse, reliable, and very safe cars...which was true.
GM and Ford are working on the marketing aspect, I guess. So while they may sell more cars, P.T.Barnum's universal rate theory on the paying public is still in FULL FORCE.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Does that explain why the Camry is the best selling car in the US?
mike hunt

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There you go, Mike, trying to yank my chain again;>)
They (Motor Trend, among others) say that the Camry is still the best selling passenger sedan in the USA. If that is the case, it is because the marketing and reputation have led the sheeple to believe it. (Heck, it might even be true..who knows?)
If Toyota has screwed up by cheaping the quality of the product, as by the recent revisions in the tranny, people will continue to buy for a long time due to perceived product image.
Barnum was an expert at marketing. He didn't mind deception as long as it brought in the customers. Some of his concepts are powerful examples of how the buying public thinks (or fails to reason).
I truly wish that GM would get its act together and make cars of the quality and durability that they are capable of producing. I have no doubt that they can make cars of excellent body integrity, strong and long lasting engines, and dependable subsystems.
- Proposing that GM has had a long history of extended production runs of recognized 'mistakes' - such as engines, transmission, bodies, alternators, etc that give unenviable performance and durability - why do YOU think that GM has done this, or allow it to go so long unaddressed?
The ISO quality standards call for a continuous improvement of products and processes as well as constant examination and improvement of the quality program. GM has arguably not seriously implemented a quality plan of this type.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The vehicles in the show room today are the only vehicles GM sells today. They are not selling what they sold ten or even five years ago. Those vehicles are as good or better than what any other manufacture has in their show rooms.. The fact is what GM is selling today can be driven home for far less than most imports that have the same equipment and are of similar size.
In the world of marketing GM will sell more of what they have to offer at their price than any other, period. If you think the price of what you can drive home, for what you can get in product, does not influence the number of vehicles you will sell and what you sold five years ago was the defining factor of what people will buy today, you have not watched Hyundai and Kia steal buyers by the thousands from Toyota and Honda in the US over the past five years.
mike hunt

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

their
far
size.
Pricing is certainly an issue.
But the question was, why did GM fail to address long runs of parts and systems of known faulty quality?
They knowingly let this plenum issue rock on for close to 10 years without improving the breed. And it really didn't take a lot to 'fix' that shortcoming.
And as you well know, this is not the only instance of this sort of thing.
If problems like this had been engineering problems only, GM has the engineering skills to fix and stop them. If it is an attitude problem, then it needs to be addressed while credibility can still be saved. If it is that GM intentionally leaves a few Easter eggs for the dealership garages, it is quite another thing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You premise that GM did nothing to fix past problems is not factual, just your opinion. I'll not dispute your opinion, you are entitled to that, but differing facts speaks for themselves.
mike hunt

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

but
They may speak for themselves, Mike, but they speak very slowly and with a lisp.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Like I said I'll not dispute your opinion, you are entitled to that. ;)
mike hunt

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The cars GM sold ten years ago is what makes for todays badwill Todays cars are overpriced to pay for old mistakes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Does that mean the junky rust buckets the Jap and Koreans sold in the US for up to twenty years will effect what they sell today? ;)
mike hunt
.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wow. New level of utter nonsense, Mike.
The first Japanese cars sold in this country were only imported a handful of years before they were redesigned into EXCELLENT small cars, for their time. The Datsun 510 and Toyota Corona come to mind. The former a BMW 1600 on the cheap and the latter a mini-version of a U.S. sedan. I remember when these cars first came out and they were the best small cars available in this country. Detroit totally ignored them until a gas crisis hit and then they came out with garbage like the Vega, Pinto, Gremlin, and Chevette.
The Korean brands were, if anything, even quicker studies. Seems like everybody learns fast except certain complacent domestics.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.