help on impala blower resistor removal

2002 Impala with only highest blower speed working. I think it is the resistor and have found it just beside the blower motor. How do you get to the two rear mounting screws (3 total)? The rubber firewall
mat seems to be in the way...cant get a 7/32 socket in there to loosen them.
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Document ID# 771895 2002 Chevrolet Impala --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Blower Motor Resistor Assembly Replacement
Removal Procedure Remove the right side instrument panel insulator. Refer to Closeout/Insulator Panel Replacement - Right in Instrument Panel, Gages and Console.
Disconnect the electrical connector from the blower motor resistor.
Disconnect the electrical connector from the blower motor.
Important The blower motor resistor opening is slotted. Access is extremely limited.
Loosen both screws to the forward blower motor resistor. Remove the rear screw to the blower motor resistor. Remove the blower motor resistor. Installation Procedure
Important Align the blower motor control processor forward retaining slots onto screws and seat the blower motor control processor against the HVAC module.
Install the blower motor resistor..
Notice Use the correct fastener in the correct location. Replacement fasteners must be the correct part number for that application. Fasteners requiring replacement or fasteners requiring the use of thread locking compound or sealant are identified in the service procedure. Do not use paints, lubricants, or corrosion inhibitors on fasteners or fastener joint surfaces unless specified. These coatings affect fastener torque and joint clamping force and may damage the fastener. Use the correct tightening sequence and specifications when installing fasteners in order to avoid damage to parts and systems.
Install the rear screw to the blower motor resistor. Tighten Tighten all screws to 1.5 Nm (13 lb in).
Connect the electrical connector to the blower motor.
Connect the electrical connector to the blower motor resistor. Install the right side instrument panel insulator. Refer to Closeout/Insulator Panel Replacement - Right in Instrument Panel, Gages and Console.

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This brings up an interesting point. Do all Americans still try to fight the metric system and use Imperial wrenches on metric hardware?
Steve
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Steve Mackie wrote:

I doubt if most of us care one way or the other. The Metric Conversion Act of 1975 says that a totally new design must be metric but an old design can be english to save mfg costs as long as the design never changes. We ended up with a hodge-podge.
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"" wrote: > Steve Mackie wrote: > > > &nbsp;> > get to the two rear mounting screws (3 total)? The > rubber firewall > &nbsp;> > mat seems to be in the way...can't get a 7/32 socket > in there to > &nbsp;> > loosen them. > > > > This brings up an interesting point. Do all Americans still > try to fight the > > metric system and use Imperial wrenches on metric hardware? > > > > Steve > > I doubt if most of us care one way or the other. > The Metric Conversion Act of 1975 says that a totally new > design must > be metric but an old design can be english to save mfg costs > as long > as the design never changes. > We ended up with a hodge-podge.
Thanks for the replacement rundown. I managed to get the screws out with considerable time and effort and made the replacement successfully. Blower works fine. By the way I use metric if metric is called for. This was an english nut - I tried metric size 6mm and 7mm first but they dont fit.
For future reference are some of the nuts metric on this car? Also is there a 1/4 inch extension tool for torque transmission thru an angle of about 30 degrees that is small diameter. Thats what I needed to access those screws next to the mat. A universal joint probably would be too big. I left the 2 screws loose and tightened the one I could get to.
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There are more metric nuts & bolts on your car than your gran pappy can shake a walking stick at..
Next time you have time try sockets on the various bolts for the alternator, water pump & water pump pulley, starter, battery cables, belt tensioner and valve covers. Write down what they are and you'll know what size sockets you'll need when the time comes to replace something.
Harryface 05 Park Avenue 91 Bonneville LE, 303,555 miles
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socbob wrote:

I'm not sure who you were responding to... I have a flex 1/4" drive extension about 3" long that comes in handy. Also I use a very small ratchet that is flat with a hole. It only ratchets one way - turn over for the other direction. In the hole goes a 1/4" male socket adaptor, the socket goes on that. It works well in cramped or close quarters.
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I don't remember blower resistor failures being much of a problem a few years back. But there seems to be frequent posts here and on the Chrysler NG these days. Has something changed in the design of these puppies causing them to be less reliable?
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