How does an oil change reminder work?

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Yeah, I am not sure what happened. I apologize for the flood.
Sincerely, Lee Richardson
says...


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GW wrote : Lee you posted the same thing twelve times.
At least it wasn't a Bakers Dozen ( 13 )
LOL
========Harryface ======== 1991 Pontiac Bonneville LE ~_~_~261,000 miles_~_~~_
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Something was going on with my computer or IP, the problem seems to be cleared up now.
Thanks, Lee Richardson

way
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the
light
and
That's what I don't get about the idea of sophisticated sensors detecting when the oil needs changing. If it was that, wouldn't that same sensor be better designed if it also turns off after it 'detects' that the oil is better again?
I'd think it would be more along the lines of specific things the computer already keeps track of. (Like the things previously mentioned... eng. temp, speed, mileage, etc). Especially if you have to 'tell' the computer that you changed the oil to get it to turn off the light.
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It seems like it would be a trivial matter to put some kind of switch on the drain plug or oil filter base that would trip when the plug or filter was removed, and that signal could be used to reset the system.

temp,
you
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On Wed, 13 Aug 2003 21:00:26 -0500, the renowned "Lee Richardson"

But that adds complexity and wiring, the "sensorless" systems are basically free (just a bit of firmware) except for the light itself.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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True, but they don't seem to shy away from complexity and extra wiring in many other potentially less important systems.
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http://www.speff.com
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I am not sure you are giving them enough credit stu. I don't claim to be the almighty expert either. I think they measure operating hours, crank revolutions and operating temperatures at a minimum and calculate useable oil life from that data.
Cheers, Howard
(punt=.)

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I read that the BMW computer monitors number of starts, time elapsed, miles, engine temperature reached etc to compute when oil change is needed.

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A computer chip monitors, the number of starts, RPM's, running hours, engine temperature, (and a fifth parameter which escapes me at the moment,) and does a calculation then illuminates the light.
mike hunt
larrymoencurly wrote:

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On Fri, 08 Aug 2003 14:30:51 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@mailcity.com wrote:

It would be helpful if we knew the make, model, and year of the vehicle.
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snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (larrymoencurly) wrote in message

Though the manual for my car claims the service light comes on based on severity of use, it's always been at 7500 mile intervals as far as I can tell. That doesn't mean it couldn't, or even doesn't, sense things like cold operating time, etc.
The oil level sensor is a float which drives a couple of magnetic reeds for mine. The original float got "oil-logged" and falsely indicated low oil when it was hot.
Cheers, Tom
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Most new cars like honda's etc still use mileage as there indicator light. Some also give you an option to change this number so the indicator shows up after that number of miles driven. This is particularly good because of different types of oil and driving conditions we go through. I mostly use Synthetic oil and therefore have to set my oil change either by 5000 miles, looks or 6 months interval. It is a good idea to change it after 6 months anyways due to the oxidation factors of the oil which kills the detergent in the oil after it is first exposed to the air, it seems to hold up for only 6 months or so.
Some people go for over 3000 miles every oil change and I kinda disagree with that in some ways, unless you know your driving conditions. If you are a highway driver and use conventional oil then I'm sure you can go way over 5000 miles or so. I have opened up engines with 3000 miles regular oil changes with only normal city driving being nasty inside with all kinds of sludge.
I would say follow the manufactures recommendations mostly because those numbers are tested to work best on that particular car. As far as type of oil is concerned, viscosity matters so go with manufactures recommendations also. On mine I have seen better gas mileage with 5W-30 Mobil 1 synthetic.
snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (larrymoencurly) writes:

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Tend to disagree with your oil change mileages. Combustion is the #1 progenitor of oil degradation (and I don't mean oxidation) and not exposure to air per se. Heat resistance is part of the API & MilSpec tests for oil validation (if you need a standards reference). The #2 cause is the accumulation of combustion by-products washed during the lubrication process that eventually degrades oil detergents and oil quality (i.e. the detergents suspend dirt in solution). Hence the reason to change one's oil. Oils do not "wear out" by oxidation and can be easily recycled >> http://www.recycleoil.org/ & http://api-ep.api.org/quality/index.cfm?bitmask 2001005000000000 . Not bringing a car's engine up to temperature, dust, poor tune, poor filters, dirty gasoline and oil pollution (e.g. broken coolant gasket) all shorten oil life. In warranty, follow your "warranty recommendation" for time and mileage. Out-of-warranty, synthetic oils can easily go 10,000 miles regardless of time. The advantages (most) synthetic oils have is that they don't oxidize easily (are intrinsically stable), are HIGHLY heat-resistant, retain their viscosity sheer range (i.e. they lubricate) and leave few by-products (also known as "varnish"). They keep your engine substantially cleaner. I agree with what you say about 5w-30 etc. on synthetics. Try synthetics in any small 4-cycle engines you have .. . you'll also see quite a difference from conventional oil.
Bill
(larrymoencurly) writes:

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It's not the oil that wears out, it's the supplement package. You need to replace the oil to get new additives. I would say in normal commute driving (short trips) the number one reason to change your oil is moisture, since it builds up condensation and never really get's it all out before you shut it off again. That's why your exhaust will rust off so soon.
T
(larrymoencurly) writes:

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