How important is it to first warm up the car? winter

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I think that what Floyd has supplied us with here is best applied to the garden after the ground thaws - the bull can always make more of it. I seriously doubt that the military removes batteries from their aircraft because it would be too time consuming.
My uncle lived in Wyoming and he used to keep the battery and engine oil by the kitchen stove when the vehicle wasn't being driven. It's only a machine, not a person - get over it. Just change the oil regularly, use a very low weight oil in the winter (like 5w30, etc.), and if possible, use a block heater. I have never owned a vehicle that had less than 100,000 miles on the odometer when I got rid of it and only one of my vehicles ever required an engine overhaul (it was that way when I bought it). All these gyrations and Hous-Pocus garbage of yours are totally unnecessary (and I don't care if 10,000 websites say differently, I know what has worked for me and others). Rich B
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wrote:

When we had a really cold spell here in Upstate NY several years ago the local school left the busses running overnight. They left them going for about a week IIRC. 90% were diesel engines at that time, the rest were CNG. Ratio is quite different now, don't know the mix though...
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Mistercmk wrote:

Considering you called him a pussy, why should be be obliged to give you any of what you're asking for? If you want the info, go find it on google yourself. What are you, some kind of primadonna?
Or, keep starting your car in subzero weather without another thought. It's *your* car, and your money. Do whatever the hell you want with it.
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On 18 Feb 2004 13:19:11 -0800, scott snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com (Childfree Scott) wrote:

I agree. I get in the car, let it idle for about one minute and slowly take off driving. I DO have a carbureted car too. People that let their cars idle for long periods are actually doing more harm, at least with a carburetor type engine. They start the car and go in the house and le it idle for 15 minutes or more. Well, because no one is stepping on the gas, the engine is isling with the choke closed most of the way. So, until someone steps on the gas to open the choke, the engine is sucking in huge amounts of gas, and that gas is washing all the oil off the cylinder walls and pistons. Worse yet, that gas is getting into the crankcase, diluting the oil, and doing more damage.
Get in the car, start the engine, let it rev for a minute, accellerate a few times, and start driving. If it's severely cold, you might take another minute, but no more. Also, when it's severely cold, I shift into neutral for a part of a minute. That gets the auto-trans fluid moving.
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| Scott) wrote: | | [SNIP] | They start the car and go in the house and let | it idle for 15 minutes or more. |
In Washington, D.C. you can get a $50 fine for leaving your car idling unattended. If the engine is running someone MUST be in the driver's seat. They're starting a crack-down campaign this week on that, as a matter of fact.
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The law doesn't apply to American cops. I see them turn on their bombs to get through a red light all the time.
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What brought that on? Is it being presented as a safety issue, an environmental issue, or a theft-prevention measure?
Geoff
--
"I should've told you I was a leper
before we made love." -- Sam Kinison
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Geoff Miller wrote in alt.autos.gm

Probably theft prevention. The Seattle Tacoma area is one of the leading areas in the country for auto theft, and one of the more common ways to lose a car is to start it up on a cold morning, and sit inside drinking a cup of coffee. And many of the people go out and find their car missing.
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get an auto-starter so you can start the car without the ignition key. Police write a ticket ?#@
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writes: | | > In Washington, D.C. you can get a $50 fine for leaving | > your car idling unattended. If the engine is running | > someone MUST be in the driver's seat. They're starting | > a crack-down campaign this week on that, as a matter oa | > f fact. | | | What brought that on? Is it being presented as a safety | issue, an environmental issue, or a theft-prevention | measure? | | |
From what I understand, theft prevention. Even if you lock the car doors, they will still levy the fine
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I would guess it is for safety reasons. An automobile which is not controlled can be come a lethally dangerous thing. If the vehicle were to slip into gear with no one to steer and shut it down it could be a disaster. Also, unattended running cars, if overheated could catch fire. Someone operating the car would in most circumstances prevent such things from happening. Thus the need for the operator to be present.
On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 15:00:29 -0500, "James C. Reeves"

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I used to have an 84 Buick LeSabre, and after that, an 89 Cadillac Brougham. I found that on some days, the only way to keep the car going was to sit behind the wheel and keep my foot on the pedal, giving it short bursts of gas to keep the engine from stalling. When it kicked down to low idle (choke opened), I'd need to leave it running for another 5 minutes so that it didn't stall under initial load.
I remember having to replace the Buick's carb after some garage goon stripped the thread of the fuel filter housing, spilling fuel all over the manifold. It really changed the car's character... after that, it needed three pumps before starting on days below -10.
Carbs were tempermental as hell during cold days, but gave the car a lot more character.
(Childfree

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Chokes increase the richness of the air/fuel mixture, but they do it by restricting -- "choking" -- the volume of air coming into the engine, not by increasing the amount of fuel.

Since gasoline is volatile, that gas comes right out of the oil as soon as it warms up. And since the engine is running with no load on it *before* it warms up, I'm not sure I see how any additional wear, let alone damage, would be inflicted on the engine.
I saw a training film years ago about how to cold-proof an airplane in preparation for letting it sit in extremely low temperatures overnight. The airplane used as an ex- ample was an old P-2 Neptune, which is relevant because it had piston engines. Using controls in the cockpit, it was actually possible to pump small amounts of gasoline into the engine crankcases to keep the oil from thickening. No harm was done, since the gas evaporated when the engines warmed up the next time they were started.

What's the purpose of revving the engine a few times? (I take it that this is what you mean by "accelerate.")
Geoff
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Todays cars with fuel injection & all the computer & electronic parts don't really need to be warmed up like cars of the 60's, 70's & 80's.
My brother ( who don't care anything about cars ) has parked outdoors all his life. He starts the car, and 8 seconds later he's driving away.
My dad, who parks in the garage let the pick up truck run about 30 seconds after starting before driving off.
Mother only lets the car run barely 20 seconds & she's off & running.
My car, you can count 1, 2 and the motor is running. By the time I get the seat belt on, sunglasses on, write down what the odometer reading is, get a cassette shoved in the radio about 60 seconds have passed, then I take off.
Generally I've found if its above 20 degree's out and your car is in perfect running order about a 60 second wait after starting is all you need.
Its just a matter of preferance.
Good Luck
========Harryface ======== 1991 Pontiac Bonneville LE 3800 V6 ( C ), Black/Slate Grey _~_~_~_~276,925 miles_~_~_ ~_~_
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Harry Face wrote in alt.autos.gm

Much of the need for warming up cars came from the days when the only oil available was single viscosity. You would change the viscosity when you changed your oil at the change of seasons. For instance, in the late fall you would go to 10 weight, and in late spring you would go to 30 weight. You would need to warm up the engine to allow the oil to reach the temperature it needed to properly lubricate the engine. Believe me, 30 weight oil flows like molasses at any temperature under 70 or 80 degrees. 10 weight flows like modern 10w-30. The oil would have to warm up so it flowed like 10 weight oil is supposed to flow at normal temperatures. However 10 weight oil, when warmed up too high, is too thin to provide proper lubrication. Thus we have the modern multi viscosity oils, which flow like the lowest rating at all temps and yet retain the lubrication of the higher viscosity listed. Also, the older cars with carburators had a very fast idle for initial warm up. They would drop off of that as soon as you started giving it the gas, and if the car wasn't warm enough, it would stall. So you needed to let it warm up for a minute or two. Modern cars use sensors to tell how much air and fuel are needed, coupled with modern oils long warm ups are not needed.
sniplet

I get in the car, start the engine, put on my seat belt and wait for all the tests to be completed, such as ABS system, then I am good to go. Although if my wife is coming, I may have to idle for longer.
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I'd say give it 2-3 minutes, so that the oil gets a chance to circulate and any knocks and slaps quiet down. My LT1 is noisy as hell because the pistons shrink, so I wait until the noise disappears and then go. I keep the engine below 2000rpm until the temp gauge reaches normal, just to be on the safe side.

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Yeah forged pistons make a lot of noise on start up.
says...

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You should follow your owners manual first.
But this is what I got for instructions for my smaller engine car. Viscosities have dropped over the last few decades(i use 5w30), and because of this, oil flows easier compared to the days when you had to warm up your car. Also, since high fuel economy cars burn so little gas when idling, they don't warm up fast(I tested this, 15mins on a cold day, and still not in the normal range), and are designed that way. So, I read on cold days start car let car sit for one minute, and then drive away, without driving at high speeds till car has a few more minutes to warm up.
hth,
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