How to determine timing gear condition 2.8?

I have an '88 Cavalier 2.8 which ran perfectly normal until I shut it off and when I went to start it 2 hours later it just cranks and cranks. I just towed it home and haven't looked at it yet.
The engine has unknown miles, as it's not original. I am going to check a few things first, like the crank sensor, which on these are known to leach oil from the crankcase through the sensor and onto the prongs the harness plugs onto, and cause a no-start, and can be blasted off with electronic cleaner periodically (per a TSB on the subject) to avoid that problem. So I routinely do that every time I change the oil, but in this case, that wasn't all that long ago, so I'm thinking that's not the problem. But it acts the same.
In my experience, when a timing gear goes out it acts just like that (runs normal, then suddenly won't start). How do you determine the position of the timing gear on these (it is an MPFI with no distributor). I can't tell by the way it cranks if the valve timing is good or bad -- it cranks plenty fast, but I don't know if it's faster than usual, since it just pops right off normally.
Also, any other time I've had a timing gear go bad, IIRC the engine was firing at weird times and trying to run backwards. But they were all distributor equipped. This one doesn't do that, but could that be because it is crank-triggered? I can't tell if it's firing at all, and I didn't smell gasoline while trying to start it. It just cranks and cranks.
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blowout preventer wrote:

Compression test will tell you if the cam timing is off.
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I checked the crankshaft sensor and sprayed it with electronic cleaner. In doing so I snapped off the clip which holds the connectors together. The whole thing seems pretty crispy.
Can I get another pigtail to solder onto the wiring harness to replace the broken one (like you can for parking lights etc}? Or is that circuit using shielded wire of some kind since it only carries very low voltage pulses?
Also, long story short, I found a blown fuse which runs the ign and injectors. What is likely the cause of that? Shorted injector? The ign module (that the coils plug onto) is fairly new, and none of the injectors are new.
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blowout preventer wrote:

It seems like GM has always had problems with crank sensors. The early ones are simple coils of wire. RockAuto has connectors. Yours is 2 conductor. About $12. The coil is just a pulse generator, its not Hall Effect. I have never dealt with RockAuto but I like their online catalog. It has nice pictures. The fuse... idk. They do go bad from age, heat, etc. A shorted injector may not matter to the fuse since a good one is low ohms, high current, short duration.
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On Mon, 24 Sep 2012 16:47:24 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@msn.com (blowout preventer) wrote:

I've seen some replacement connectors with pigtails in auto parts stores but don't know about that one in particular. But you could just glue it back in place. With just a relatively small amount of silicone sealant glue it might be reversible if you need to get it off later.

Too many unknowns for me to answer that one.
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