How we can help lower gas pump prices.

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Actually there is more than 'a little atomic' as you refer to nuclear generated electricity in the US. It is around 21%, too bad we are not like other counties that produce the majority, up to 90%, of their electricity
with lower cost, safer nuclear power. Wing is around 2% in comparison
mike hunt

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You are correct in the figure of about 21% nuclear. No new plants have been contracted in a long time, I believe.
At one point, a number of them were running far below capacity. The South Texas nuclear facility was a real sore point, with enormous cost overruns which were passed directly to the taxpayers. When that thing came online it was fraught with problems and for a long time operated at no more than about 25% capacity, as I remember it. (and I'll admit that memory is sometimes a dirty liar!)
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Joining the crowd on this, don't hold your breath for $1.30 oil. It is most likely gone FOREVER.
Prepare to pay $3 and up for awhile.
To all those who bought gas guzzling SUV's, enjoy them, (even though it may feel like you are paying alimony.) MobilExxon thanks you, ChevronTexaco thanks you, and their stockholders thank you.
Any car I buy now will have to get near 30 mpg on the highway or more. I will personally watch my driving habits, and plan my trips, as I am on a retirement income. And I will get my bicycle out for the shorter errands... probably live longer that way anyhow.
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That is what usually happens when the price of gasoline goes up, the people with the econoboxes drive less. Those that can afford 50K or 70K to buy what they buy don't seem to worry about the price of the fuel they need.
The people that are thankful for high gas prices are the commodious buyers, they are the ones making the most money off of gasoline, along with the government LOL
mike hunt

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This is what I DON'T UNDERSTAND.
Vehicles were making over 30MPG well over two decades ago. And people are satisfied with that two decades later.
--
Jonny
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Well, not all people are satisfied with it. When you look at the cars on the market, there are not so many that will give you a true 30-35 mpg.
Hybrids can do it, but that technology is still not well accepted, and the costs and risks of buying are elevated.
Americans, in particular, still want their big cars with powerful engines,and that is what the car makers are going to offer...as long as they can. Only when Americans demand more efficient cars, and are willing to buy them, will we reduce our consumption of petroleum.
And why should we reduce it? Namely, because we are at a strategic disadvantage. We produce only a third to a half roughly of the petroleum we use...the rest is imported from foreign sources and that supply chain is stretching thinner and thinner.
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That's easy, American are not willing to buy little cars in great numbers, as their primary vehicles. They prefer the larger safer vehicles that why 55% of the vehicles sold in the US are trucks and SUVs.
mike hunt

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How are they safer if everyone else gets the same or similar SUV? Sounds like a programmed reply. You and alot of others seem that way here. And making the dominoes fall the way you want, but not making sense in the process (in my mind). Rather it sounds like a "moo" in the big cattle gathering. No cahoonas to stand your ground to save you some money. "Moo, moo, moo"
--
Jonny
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Think about it.

here. And

"Moo,
You're funny Jonny. Your's is the herd mentality. Likewise, it's the one with no thought put into the comment. Think hard through your initial comment above. Don't just jump on your anti-SUV wagon. The whole "herd mentality", "moo" thing has become a tired cliche of the little car folks. I'm not sure if it's really herd mentality at work within that group, or the annoying sound of a swarm of insects.
--

-Mike-
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One can not defy the laws of physics. The larger the vehicle the less likely the changes that properly belted passengers will be injured or killed, even if one collides with one of the same type. The reason is simple, the larger the vehicles the more room there is to design in the crumple zones. The better the crumple zones, the better able to absorb the impact, the slower will be the terminal speed of the 'third collision,' when your organs strikes your skeleton.
mike hunt

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wrote:

Ergo.... we should all ride on a bus !
<rj>
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I guess if you set back far enough and do not get hit by a semi or a locomotive. ;)
mike hunt

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What make you believe the oil companies can control the price of gas? If they actually could control the price, the price would never go down. The only was the average person can save money on fuel is to buy stock in one of the commodities companies. ;)
mike hunt

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of
They dont directly control the world crude oil prices. But they have a vested interest in them... Those companies which refine crude to produce gasoline and other products could conceivably sell the gasoline over a range of prices...If they conspired, the refiners could get a pretty penny for gasoline. They could take scalps.
If they chose to enter fuel wars, they could possibly sell it a bit cheaper than we would predict.
For example, a barrel of crude is 42 US gallons, or 168 US quarts. If that barrel costs $70, then they would have to refine a product mix that would yield an average of $0.42 per quart, or $1.68 per gallon to break even.
Lubricating oil and other specialty distillates make more than that by far. So gasoline is almost like a waste product.. They COULD sell it for less, but why should they??
The oil companies are not in it to subsidize goobers with guzzling SUV's. They want to make money from that barrel of oil...
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Can we assume you never heard of the commodities market, where the price of crude is set by competitive buyers? ;)
mike hunt

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Of course I have heard of the commodities market... Regardless of the price of crude, there are many ways to handle the accounting of refining operations. The oil companies have oil they receive from existing contracts and that they buy on the spot market.
They refine the crude and come up with an optimum product mix from that crude. And, they set their prices for this mix based on the (1) commodities prices of the feed stock, (2) the cost of their total overhead including refining operations, and (3) what the market will bear. They are in it to make money, not to subsidize goobers driving 400 hp SUVS.
Do we more or less agree;>)
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Let us assume your analysis is correct for a moment, that they did sell off the distillates from their lower cost crude at lower prices. Where would they get the money to replace that $50 a barrel crude with the current $70 a barrel crude?
Look at it this way. While inspecting the garage you just bought, the Fire Marshall discovers a 55 gallon drum of gasoline.. You are ordered to dispose of it within 24 hours or pay $500 a day fine. The 12 gallon tank in your car is full. Somebody offers you $1.50 a gallon for it, another offers you $2 a gallon. To whom will you sell the gas, considering to replace it you will need to pay $2.50 a gallon?
mike hunt

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off
a
Fire
dispose
you
We are saying exactly the same thing, Mike.
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The world in general may be out of oil as soon as 2012, 30 years later at the outset. And you're scheming how to make it cheaper, thus using more, and accelerating the process.
6 or 7 dollars a gallon is more appropriate for the present. Tune up your Moped. No, I'm not kidding.
Major world problems: population growth, resources to support such a population including oil, food sources, and potable water. Economic systems, especially the USA, all depend on more population, resources, and productivity.
But for fun, guess all can talk about the futile and short (and getting shorter) term crapola you're speaking of.
--
Jonny



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