keys made for gm cars

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Exactly how many different keys does GM make for its vehicles?

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Exactly the right amount?
What a stupid open ended question.
bus67 wrote:

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It was poorly worded. I produce a talk show and a caller had stated that GM only makes a certain amount of keys for all their different models. My host wanted to know how many different types of keys they make to fit their vehicles. The caller had suggested that some models from different divisions, say the Chevy Blazer and it's GMC counterpart, had a similarly designed key or key makeup. Sorry if my terminology is incorrect. But basically basically we were trying to find out if that's true and if it is how many different keys or key styles are made.
Weird wrote:

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So contact a GM PR person.
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I don't have a clue today, but years ago, it was common to take the key from a 55 Chevy and find it fits in a 58 Olds or other GM car. I'm sure that has improved with technology of keys and locks.
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bus67 wrote:

The answer is.... IT DEPENDS. GM has at least 8 standard ignition blanks and 6 door blanks in the 2 key system and 4 in the double bit single key. Toss in the passkey blanks with 15 different resistor values and the newer transponder keys and they add up. Then if you look at the imports sold as GMs you can add at least 4 more blanks. Those are just the blanks. Now add in the 5-10 cuts for each blank type and that there are also 7 different depths for each of those cuts and you end up with a LOT of combinations. That being said YES different models may take the same blanks, and without a doubt there are vehicles out there that have the same key.
--
Steve W.
Near Cooperstown, New York
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Thanks for the information. Sorry I didn't phrase my question better in the first place.
Steve W. wrote:

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http://www.carkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/gmc/200608/1
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bus67 wrote:

Exactly two. One for the ignition and one for the trunk.
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" Paul " <"=?x-user-defined?Q??= Paul

Ummm. As far back as I can remember (1950's), on my GM cars "one" key operated the doors, ignition and the trunk.
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Think for a sec, one square for ignition and a round one for the trunk.
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Boy o' boy. It's hell to get old. Well at least the last several GM's have needed only one key.
Thanks for straightening out an old feeble minded geezer!
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IIRC, GM used the same key for doors and ignition. I used to carry a single key in my wallet as a spare for that reason, but others used a different key for the doors and ignition
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" Paul " <"=?x-user-defined?Q??= Paul

Unless you have a newer model. My '96 Bonnie has 2 keys, but my '01 Montana has 1.
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80 Knight wrote:

Yeah. I rent a GM about once a month and they all have One Key. But two sounded better.
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" Paul " <"=?x-user-defined?Q??= Paul

Yeah. I rent a GM about once a month and they all have One Key. But two sounded better.
True, true. I usually like the 2 key's better anyhow. I always keep a door key in my wallet, just in case I lock the regular keys in the ignition. My van key is rather large to keep in a wallet (at least the head is anyhow, and I don't feel like getting another PKIII key made).
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In 1974 some GM cars had 3 keys, one for the door, another for ignition, and glove box and trunk (glad that was short lived). Later models had the ignition by itself, and the other key worked everything else (doors, trunk & glovebox). This is true of my 92 Lumina, but my Impala has one. Roy " Paul " <"=?x-user-defined?Q??= Paul

Yeah. I rent a GM about once a month and they all have One Key. But two sounded better.
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This thread brings back some old memories I'd just as soon forget . .
In the old days GM used a single key for all locks and used a 4-year cycle for key cuts - the keys from say a 1955 GM car would NOT fit a 1956 but would fit a 1959 (I'm talking about just the act of sliding the key into the lock, not if the key would turn, which is dependent on the tumbler coding).
They continued this setup until 1969, when they converted to a 2-key system (doors & ignition on one key, glove and trunk on a different key with a different groove cut). In 1972 the key layout was changed again after GM had a rash of cars being stolen from dealer lots and storage - the "square" key was ignition only, the "round" key was doors, glove and trunk.
I remember that changeover well: I was in college working for a Buick dealer and changed out the door locks on over 200 cars (that was NOT a fun job, especially on Electras and Riverias): the door locks where changed to match the existing trunk/glove locks. Some GM divisions did that change differently: they changed out the ignition cylinders, hence some 1972~1974 cars with 3 keys (I think that idea was to use up existing stocks of door locks with the "square key" groove cut).
The 2 key system continued until the late 1990s when GM converted to the present 2-sided key cut with the PassKey III system and only 1 key for all locks. If my memory serves me, the "W" body cars where the first ones converted to the new system.
Personally I like the 2-key PassKey II system like I have on my 1994 Buick. On the other hand, the 1969-1972 2-key system had the advantage that one could lock the glove box and trunk, give just the square key to a parking lot attendent so they could open the doors and start to car to move it if necessary, but keep the trunk and glove box secure. With that system you only had to have one spare key in your wallet to open the car and start it (but it also made those cars easier to steal).
When it comes down to it, ANY locking system can be compromised, even fancy electronic locks (and transponder keys - I've heard reports that Honda transponder keys are VERY easy to "hack").
Regards, Bill Bowen Sacramento, CA

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My 92 Lumina has 2 keys, but my 2000 Impala has one. However, both cars have live remote trunk lock switches so the trunk can be opened by anyone if the car is unlocked. Roy

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Used to be you had a different key to lock the trunk release out, good for when using valet parking. But that cost $1 so it was eliminated.
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My old 1990 and 1991 Bonneville's both had electric trunk releases inside the glove box, but you had to have the ignition on to use them. I always thought it was a pain in the ass.
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