Looking for a mid-size domestic car recommendation

Page 7 of 16  


I just thought that I'd butt in here. I'm possibly going to be a doctor. Do you know how much liability insurance is for them? Anywhere from 53k a year on up to around 300k (http://www.acep.org/1,32158,0.html ). How about you try dealing with the human body? Next time you're sick don't go to a doctor, figure it out on your own and figure out the way to take care of it.
These are people that go to school for around 8 years, give or take a few. When they're done on average they have around 100k in student loans. Then they go to internships where they're "only" supposed to work 80 hours a week, yet some hospitals make them work more. Many times they're going in for 120 to 140 hours a week. So help me out here, why should I work so hard to become a doctor if I'm just going to get my ass sued off?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Phillip Schmid wrote:

Simple. Because through all of your hard work and study, people sharing Art's political philosophy (roughly: "you've got more than me, so hand it over") stand to get rich. They want to piggyback off your efforts in order to make up for their own shortcomings. They'll use class envy and trumped up media coverage to do so, because, after all, a perfect outcome should be within reach of every physician in every circumstance.
(I must caution you, though, that if you're too successful as a physician, you'll likely contribute to that other Big Social Problem: the overwhelmingly large population of the aged, for which the only prescribed remedy will be yet another form of socialism. Don't say you weren't warned.)
Personally, I hope that somebody like you who's bright enough to see the pitfalls continues on to become a medical doctor. You'll likely have to put up with idiots bemoaning your high pay and tolerate punitive insurance premiums, but good people are needed in the medical profession.
Best of luck.
--Geoff
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think that pretty much sums it up.
Thanks, I'm sure I'll be needing it when I'm all done with schooling.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
So tell your fellow professionals not to screw up and insurance rates will go down. But instead you want government regulation. That is what I love about rightwingers. No government regulation allowed except to screw consumers.

to
lawsuits,
become
Do
year
try
hard
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have no problems with suing IF the person can do a better job themselves based on the problems. I DO want legislature passed that'll limit the amount that can be gained. I think here in WI it's something like 100k, which is alot better then the millions that people seem to get.
I'm also not sure if you've heard, but doctors here in the US can choose to not see certain people. As a matter of fact I think in South Carolina some doctors have recently chosen not to treat lawyers and their clients that bring malpractice suits against them.
If it's so easy to tell people not to screw up and get it right then let's see how you do here.
A man injures his wrist on broken glass. Which of the following structures entering the palm superficial to the flexor retinaculum may be damaged?
Ulnar nerve and median nerve - A Median nerve and flexor digitorum profundus - B Median nerve and flexor pollicis longus - C Ulnar artery and ulnar nerve - D Ulnar nerve and flexor digitorum superficialis - E
I have a few more if you want to keep going too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 20:20:31 -0500, "Phillip Schmid"

well seeing as flexor digitorum profundus is your deep muscle for flexion, that would rule B out I think. and as the Flexor pollicis Longus is a muscle of the radial side of the forearm that to my mind rules C out. Seeing as the flexor digitorum superficialis is a superficial muscle of the palmar side of the forearm I'll rule that E out. Seeing as the Ulnar is the bone extending from the elbow to the wrist on the side opposite to the thumb in humans that would rule D out I think.
I guess that would really only leave A Ulnar nerve and median nerve BUT, I could well be wrong seeing as I've got no training in that field.. However I suppose another factor to consider would be the trajectory of the glass and the persons definition of "superficial":
Do they mean: a) Trivial & insignificant. b) Concerned with only what is apparent or obvious c) Apparent rather than actual or substantial or d) being on or near the surface?
But you're reading a post from a person who's language training is not in medicine, but in the arts & engineering.
I'm not expecting my Jiffy Lube kid to know a Brachial Plexus from a Acromioclavicular Joint. But you know damn well I expect him to know the difference between engine oil & brake fluid when he's filling "reservoir's" under the hood of my car. Plus if it was your Car that had engine oil swell all the rubber in your braking system you would expect compensation and not think that your right to sue should be limited to the cost of a free oil change.
I expect the same from my medical "Professionals" I don't care if they know the difference between a stoichiometric fuel/air mixture & stichometric prose construction, but I damn well expect (and by the way, pay) them to know the difference between a Scapula and a Clavicle
Hence. the basis of lawsuits for shoddy doctors. I admire and respect competent professionals in all fields. I believe that incompetent & fraudulent characters from any field should be removed (*ESPECIALLY GOVERNMENT*) Lawsuits are an extremely blunt instrument but until we get to see MD's medical school grades and patient treatment reviews plus treatment results, it's all we've got to work with.
Want to stop lawsuits? Have a public rating system for doctors where people sign waivers acknowledging their understanding of their doctor's abilities & a "meat chart" for injuries (incorrectly amputated arm $50K, erroneously sterilization of a young woman $25K etc etc
just my $0.02
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's D in case you were wondering. I was just using it as an example to show that medicine isn't as easy as some people think it is.
I do think that there is a way to find out stuff about your doctor. I can't honestly remember how but I think it has something to do with the licensing board.
I'm fine with people suing medical practitioners if they don't fix whatever harm they've done. It's the extravagent amount of money that people get suing doctors that I have a problem with. I can understand a little extra for pain. I remember reading of a case in Germany where a lady sued her doctor after surgery for leaving an instrument in her. I believe that she got $20k for pain/suffering and the cost of the surgery to get the instrument out. I think that's very reasonable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 22:42:27 -0500, "Phillip Schmid"

Luckily for the public it looks like a medical career is not in my future ;-) I understand where you are coming from with regards to extravagant settlement amounts but those tend to be a result of Jury Awards.
Do you honestly think the people that are on springer every day can understand the difference between $100K & $1 million? After all it's only 1 more zero ;-)
I think that Judicial settlements (with the option of appeal) are the most reasonable approach.
Imagine you were the German woman with the medical instrument left in you. Your career was going to be lingerie model & your fiance left you after your 8 months of endless bitching about "the pain" You've now got a 12" scar across your stomach that every subsequent guy will see (and wonder about) the scar. This is assuming you've not got any ongoing pain which limits your sex life.
Does the value of a used mini van sound reasonable? I suppose where you live also plays a part. If you're in the middle of Alaska (or perhaps Alabama) $20K might buy you a nice house, but in New York It might buy you a dinner (plus perhaps a movie).
I'm thinking, keep the present system, lose the Jury awards and Thank GOD that I'm not a Doctor.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Haha, you raise a few points there that I never thought about. I do think that you're right though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Full_Name wrote:

That, to me, is 90% of the problem - the "Springer" mentallity that our society has bought into, and it shows up in the juries.
Bill Putney (to reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with "x")
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm sure the lawyers won't mind taking the money of incompetent doctors who need a legal defense. Lawyers are much more fair-minded than incompetent doctors, in my experience. I have lots of doctor friends. Only 1 has been sued and it was for a relatively trivial amount and he admits a difficult patient and paper work screw up did him in. He hasn't made the mistake again. If a patient won't cooperate he shows him the door and he makes sure he writes all his notes down immediately.
By the way, about 5% of the doctors are responsible for almost half the malpractice awards. If the doctors policed themselves and took away those bad doctor's licenses your rates would go down by about half.

will
love
amount
to
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 Aug 2004 02:28:48 GMT, "Art"

where I rambled, you were succinct Kudo's !
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm going to try to find that article, I don't think it was just the doctors that were being sued that declined to care for someone. I also think it wasn't for lawyers that just had one lawsuit under their belt but the ones that advertise it. I can't say that I really blame them though.
There's a doctor a bit away from here that has quite a few lawsuits lining up against him and because of those he's been under investigation by the licensing board. I also think that patients have the ability to complain to boards about their doctors. If there are enough complaints they investigate and revoke/suspend licenses.
Somewhere here in Wisconsin there was a couple whoms' child died during an illness. So they sued the doctor for misdiagnosing the illness (they won but they hit the $100k limit). I've heard of lawsuits where a doctor was sued after stopping at an accident to help it's victims. One of the questions that med schools ask is "If you drove past an accident without any responders there would you get out and help the victims knowing full well that you could be sued?" I'd be wary of getting out and helping knowing that if I screw up it's my head even if I save a life or lives. There is going to be a point where the lawsuits get so frivolous that people aren't going to consider going into that profession.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 23:08:12 -0500, "Phillip Schmid"

I believe that in France and Canada people who stop to help a person in an accident cannot be sued for any non-intentional incompetence.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 27 Aug 2004, Full_Name wrote:

Must be one of those restrictions of freedom that Geoff likes to bleat about in reference to Canada.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 26 Aug 2004, Phillip Schmid wrote:

Up here in Canada, too. There are doctors who've made the news for refusing to continue to see their patients who will not quit smoking.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Recently in NC there was a car stopped at a stop sign and a 50 year old tree fell without warning and killed the people inside. You don't cut down all trees because that happened once. There are all kinds of anecdotal stories out there about lawsuts. Most have been reversed on appeal and you don't hear that part of the story from people who want riduculous limits on lawsuits. When doctors do their job correctly they don't get sued.

incompetent
difficult
those
doctors
to
investigate
but
that
to
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art wrote:

Well, maybe / maybe not. About 10 years ago my Mother was driving Her company car down a main street in the town nearest where she worked. A large limb fell from an old oak tree and smashed her car. Fortunately she suffered only superficial injuries. Comprehensive insurance replaced the car (the companies insurance, not the town's insurance). My Mother didn't get any money from anyone (or ask for it). However, the town promptly cut down the offedning tree and all the other large old trees on that street that were on the towns right of way.
Regards,
Ed White
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

With that one story I told before the family is trying to appeal the law here to get more then the 100k. If they didn't take the child to the doctor the same ending would have resulted. I could understand the parents getting quite a bit more if he was involved in the death, but he wasn't. Once again, if it's so easy stop going to doctors to figure out what's wrong.
Different people have different ways of defining correct. I have a knee problem and I went to my doctor a few times and each time he said that it's nothing. After about the 4th time I went to a specialist and he told me I need surgery. Do I think that the first doctor did his job correctly? Absolutely. Quickly? Not at all. There was another time when I was having pains in my abdominal region and I went in but they couldn't find anything wrong so they took a blood test. Within a few hours they told me to go right to a hospital. They never found out what was wrong. Do I think that they did that correctly? Not really, I'd like to know what I had. Quickly? Yep. There's a tradeoff between following everything exactly down to the letter and trying to do things quickly. You can try all you'd like to do both at the same time, but sometimes certain events don't allow it.
Say you're having heart surgery and something goes wrong. Do you want the surgeon to take his time or would you prefer that he kind of speed it up? In a perfect world everything and everyone would work at 100% speed and with a 0% error rate all the time. If he doesn't move fast enough you'll die and he gets sued by your family. If he moves faster and makes a mistake he gets sued by you. If you can handle that kind of pressure, kudos to you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That is why you buy insurance.

all
don't
doctor
getting
again,
it's
right
did
In
a
he
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.