Malibu Dash / Heater Core

Page 1 of 2  
I stopped by the Chevy dealer to talk to one of the Goodwrench about getting my uncles motorcycle up and running, anyway there is a fairly new Malibu on the floor by his bay. The console, steering column and the
entire dashboard and everthing up to the firewall is lying all around the car on the ground. It all has to come out to remove & replace the heater core. 6 hours labor, and this is the third heater core that they are installing.
Great design GM Engineers.
harryface
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

4 months ago, replaced a heater core in a 94' Chevy Blazer S-10 Tahoe. Not a pretty sight. There wasn't much left on the firewall interior. And, was using the mfrs manual for reference. Its a matter of getting away from using KISS method and slapping all the comforts of home in the vehicle in my opinion.
Replacement of a heater core in a less than one year old vehicle is not only suspicious, but extremely out of the ordinary.
--
Jonny



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would consider that to be inexcusable.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jonny wrote:

This is fairly typical of modern cars, however. I can tell you from personal experience that this is how it is on a VW as well. I am not sure why they like to make the newer vehicles so service-unfriendly; I guess I am just spoiled by my older cars. On my '55 Studebaker you can R&R the heater core by simply removing the front seat cushion and a little air deflector plate, there's nothing else in the way.
nate
(your friendly local retro-grouch)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
N8N wrote:

You should have asked here first. There is an easier way than the factory method to replace the core in an S-10. Dash wise you only need to remove the bolts on the right side. Loosen the left and push the dash up a bit and pull it toward you. I have done the cores on the S series in less than 2 hours. Take a look at http://www.sytyarchives.com/howto/viewarticle.php?article_name=heater_core.php&dir=climate_controls
http://www.syty.org/old / http://s-series.org/component/option,com_tech_article / for some other help.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.sytyarchives.com/howto/viewarticle.php?article_name=heater_core.php&dir=climate_controls
Have done same on older vehicles, and a more recent VW at the time I anticipated doing the job. For more info, I got the factory manual. Of which just facilitated making it more complicated than it actually was. It took me 6 days. First day and a half was disassembly. The factory manual took it down this far, I did leave the instrument cluster in place as found removal unneeded despite the manual. Saw other shortcuts after doing the job. Didn't spend more than a few hours a day to cut the frustration factor, have secondary transportation.
--
Jonny



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Years ago I replaced the heater core in my 64 Malibu. Had to remove the right fender.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Harry Face) wrote:

Nothing unusual.
Did an evaporator on a 2000 Dodge pick up on Monday, 7 hours plus the evacuation and recharge. $$$ C, K, S-chassis Chevy trucks, same thing. $$$ Ford Escort, Crown Vic and Taurii, same thing. $$$ Just about any minivan, same thing. $$$ On the current version of ChryCo minivans, you have to peel most of the whole front fascia off to get to the AC drier. $$$
Third heater core on that particular Malibu, or third failure that they've seen on that model?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aarcuda,
Third heater core on that Malibu. Not sure what legnth of time each one lasted.
harryface
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Harry Face) wrote:

Thanks Harry.
Pattern failure Ian?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aarcuda69062 wrote:

Not that I know of.
Ian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harry Face wrote:

Echoing "aarcuda".
This has been par for the course for many years now. Move along, nothing new to see here!
Ian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Remember the old late 70s to mid 80s 'B' bodies? You could change a heater core in about 20 minutes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That was before CAFE and the need to downsize vehicles
mike hunt
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Doesn't explain full sized trucks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike Hunter wrote:

It doesn't really matter.....there is absolutely no reason why GM "couldn't" have made the heater cores more accessible...but they "didn't".
Ian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"aarcuda69062" wrote:
Remember the old late 70s to mid 80s 'B' bodies? You could change a heater core in about 20 minutes. ___________________________________________________
"Mike Hunter" wrote:
That was before CAFE and the need to downsize vehicles ___________________________________________________
That's right. Automakers faced with legislated requirements to increase gas mileage changed to leaner fuel mixtures and better combustion efficiency. But they knew that the single most important factor in gas mileage was vehicle weight. They made their greatest improvements in gas mileage by simply making vehicles smaller.
But a car with compressed length, width, and height would have its driveshaft passing by a driver's armpit, so the front wheel drive configuration became necessary: a transmission and differential wrapped around a sideways-mounted engine, jammed into the already tiny engine compartment.
Consumers didn't object to the almost impossible-to-service arrangement because the salesmen said it was a benefit: it would make it so much easier to drive out of a snowbank.
Rodan.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not really. Lean mixtures lend themselves to higher NOx production. Lean was a 70s solution to "oh shit, there's a learning curve ahead." Lean pretty much died in 1980-81 with closed loop fuel control.

Smaller vehicles should need smaller HVAC systems. Smaller HVAC= pop the glove box out, remove an access panel, remove [smaller] heater core

Since there is no drive shaft/transmission tunnel, that should increase the under dash room available for the HVAC system.

Doesn't explain FWD vehicle sales in Florida.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
aarcuda69062 wrote:

Yes, the "good old days". I don't "do" heater cores anymore in the shop that I work at. It's all farmed out to the "electrical/A/c" guys. Every now and then I do one or two if they are too busy, but I'm never that thrilled about being on my back under the dash for that long.
Mind you....you can turn the radio up and kindof "disappear" under the dash for an hour or two.
Ian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Do you know what the failure was? Bet it was plastic parts. I hate plastic radiator parts.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.