Malibu vs Camry - have Chevy dealers grown a pair?

Page 1 of 3  
Autoblog http://snipurl.com/1kkoi
..some Chevy dealers have grown a pair and are trying a radical move. They're bringing enemy No. 1 right into their showrooms.
Chevrolet is confident enough in its forthcoming Malibu redesign http://snipurl.com/1kkou that they're willing to have customers paw all over their mid-size offering and Toyota's Camry http://doiop.com/Camry side by side. Instead of just telling potential Malibu customers that Camry ain't all that [great], Chevy's car marketing director, Cheryl Catton, suggests dealers put one of the best- selling Toyotas right there next to Malibus. Production of the new Malibus begins in October, and GM's ad push for the car begins in January. Look for the Malibu/Camry steel cage death match to begin about then.
But wouldn't it be a small sales boost to put a Camry in every Chevy dealership? Catton thought of that, and recommends the Toyotas be rented.
[Source: Automotive News http://www.autonews.com/ - Sub. Req.]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That can not be a fair comparison. The Malibu is thousands of dollars cheaper.
Chevy should compare cars that sell around the same price. The FULL SIZE Impala is the one that sells for around the same price as the V6 Camry, with the same equipment, but the Camry is only a mid size car.
They should also post the actual total delivered price, of the Camry they bought for the comparison, and really educate the potential buyers ;)
I was at an auto show where there was a mid size FWD V6 Lexus sitting near a loaded RWD V8 Grand Marquis. People were all over the Mercury that has an MSRP over $12.000 less than the smaller Lexus ;)
mike
message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike Hunter wrote:

So how do you explain the Camry outselling the Malibu?
a) The Camry is a better car. b) The Malibu's reliability is inferior. c) Consumers are stupid or ignorant.
If you answered c), then you suffer from GM/Ford/Chrysler syndrome, a malady common among executives of loser corporations.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Apply the same logic to Big Macs, Wal*Mart, Budwiser, etc. If you think Consuners purchase cars for rational reasons, you are naive.
Here some equally twisted logic for you -
Many buyer of old style large American cars were forced by stupid CAFE rules to buy trucks and SUVs to get the type of vehicle they wanted. Ford and GM concentrated on these and surrendered the low end, low profit market to the Japanese. Meanwhile people who didn't mind small noisy rattle boxes bought Toyotas and Hondas. As they grew older, the people who bought small Japanese cars wanted larger, more comfy cars. They only knew Toyotas and Hondas, so they buy larger Toyotas and Hondas. They realize they are paying thousand more than for equivalent domestic vehciels, so in order to keep from feeling like smucks, they convince themselves that they are getting much better cars. They preach this faith like Billy Swaggart. They repeat the story so often, they convert others to their faith.
Makes as much sense as your quiz....
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed White wrote:

I wish it did, but people used to buy Japanese cars for economy, while now they buy them for quality and reliability, and not only are car buyers less brand loyal than they used to be, but buyers of Japanese ares tend to be the least brand loyal of them all.
My point is that executives at bad companies blame the consumers instead of themselves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That may be your opinion but the fact is more American buyers choose to buy the vehicles sold by GM and Ford than ANY import brand, however.
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike Hunter wrote:

So why doesn't the Malibu outsell the Camry?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Malibu Chevy wants to compare the Camry against is a new model - so hard to say anything particular. However, the question is just as nebulous as asking why more people go to Wal*Mart than Target, or why McDonalds sells more BigMacs than Burger King sells Whoppers, or why more people buy Diet Pepsi than Diet Coke. Best I can say is that there are lots of factors, not all of them rational. If people were rational, there wouldn't be any Cadillacs, Lincolns, Lexi, or Acuras. If people were rational, the F150 would not be the top selling vehicle in the US. If people were rational, Expeditions, Suburbans, Tahoes, Sequoias, etc would be extinct.
It seems to me that Chevy has at least two models that compete directly with the Camry - the Impala and the new Malibu (and for good measure you can through in the Monte Carlo which can be considered a Camry Solaria competitor and the Malibu Maxx). Plus GM has several other models (Pontiacs and Buicks) that also play in that market. If you add up all the GM competitors to the Camry, I suspect they outsell the Camry. And don't forget, for marketing reasons, Toyota lumps Camry, Solaria, and Camry Hybrid sales all under the Camry banner. Toyota puts great stock in claiming Camry is the number one selling nameplate. If GM was dedicated to doing the same, they could probably jury rig the names of vehicles to create the illusion of having a higher selling model (Maybe the Impala Malibu...).
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Few people realize GMs mid size cars sell at a higher rate than the Camry today. It just that they do not have the same model name on the grill ;)
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For the same reason Ford sell seven F150s to every Tundra Toyota sells?
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Who ever said Camry buyers were astute shoppers? LOL
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why not fair? IMO, it is better than fair if you can show the Malibu is cheaper but equal or better than the Camry. In a post tonight you stated: "The price of their vehicles will go up since the vehicles sold by the Japanese auto manufactures, who already enjoy those competitive advantages, sell for 20% to 30% more than domestics ;)"
This is a good opportunity for GM to show then can sell an equivalent car for far less.
Have you seen the recent Hyundai ads showing the comparison of the Sonata vs. BMW and the Azera vs. Lexus and the SantaFe vs. Land Rover? Now it will be Malibu vs. Camry. Good for them.
I did a similar comparison. I was looking at Buick Lucerne but found the same features in a Sonata for $5000 less. To get stability control, I'd have to move up in the Lucerne another $5000.
I do like the style of the new Malibu. Far better than the ugly front end of the Camry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When asked my advise, as to which car to buy, I suggest one drive all those that suits their needs, then get a total drive home price then buy the one that best suits their budget.
From what we saw in my fleet service business, that the only real difference between the vehicles on the market today is style and price. ;)
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 14 May 2007 15:35:19 -0400, "Mike Hunter"

However, people with more common sense know that quality is a better gauge to use than quantity in certain cases. A lump of coal is worthless compared to an intermerate diamond though both are purely made of carbon.
The typical car buyer has other features and considerations than just singularly thinking of sheer mass.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Really? Would you pay more for a smaller diamond, just because of the name of the store?
Ask any car salesman and he will tell you the last question a customer asks before signing on the bottom line to buy the car is always, 'How much is my monthly payment?' LOL
mike
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mike Hunter wrote to ViperKiller:

What if the stores are Cartier and JC Penny? It's unlikely that any Cartier diamonds are laser zapped and patched with plastic.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But are they functionally any different? If you bought the diamond at JC Penny and put in a Cartier box, would your SO be any the wiser? In ten years would the JC Penny diamond be less cherished?
Diamonds are a strange item to compare - they are not purchased for rational reasons, and the market is not truly competitive. There is no shortage of diamonds in the world, the price is artificially manipulated by DeBeers.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perhaps, but we were talk about similar product selling at vastly different prices.
mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have owned Chevy's since 88 and their is not one that I have owned that was not taken in for some warranty work. I now have a new 07 Camry and I can't find a thing wrong with it and I am pretty fussy about leaks and squeaks etc...
message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I am constatnly amazed that Toyota owners think they are lviing some sort of unique experience when they get a good Toyota. My parent shad many Fords that never required any warranty work. My current Fusion has 8,000 miles and hasn't been near a dealer since I bought it. Likewise for my son's Mustang. I've had bad Fords and a really lousy Toyota, but I've had some really good Fords as well. In the last decade, the largest out of warranty repair for a Ford was for a coil pack on a Ford Expedition. The only other out of warranty repairs were 1 fuel pump on a 12 year old F150, and an alternator on an Expedition with 100,000 miles. My total cost for all repairs on all the Fords I've owned in the last decade is less that $650. One repair on the last Toyota I owned was that much. But I wouldn't claim all Toyota were like the one I owned, but I don't think you can claim all Toyotas are perfect becasue yours is. According to the JD Power 2006 Initial Quality Study the average new Toyota has 1.06 problems in a year, the average new Ford has 1.27. According to the 2006 JD Power Dependability Survey the average 3 year old Toyota has 1.79 problems and the average three year old Ford has 2.24 problems (interstingly, the average three year old Mercury only has 1.51 problems). I doubt if any of these differences is statistically significant. The reality is that most of the major manufacturers are very close in terms of quality.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.