Oil Change Techniques

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Am I crazy or does anybody else beside me ( & my uncle ) siphon out the remaining oil in the pan after it drains out? I wish GM would put the drain bolt down on the bottom of the pan.
I get close to 4.5 ounce more oil out using a sqeeze bottle with a J shaped hose attached to the bottle.
I also pour clean oil in the filter before I install it.
========Harryface ======== 1991 Pontiac Bonneville LE, 3800 V6 _~_~_~_~276,100 miles_~_~_ ~_~_
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I pour oil in the filter as well and lube up the big rubber "O" ring....except when I do those handful of GM four bangers that mounted the filter in the back of the motor UPSIDE DOWN!! Makes a mess....I think it is the Tech 4 series motors...........but do not remember...I have not done one in a long time

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Are you crazy? I've never gotten 276,100 miles out of an engine! That said, does that extra 1/4 quart really mean that much in the long run? Probably not... I do tend to let the oil run a really long time when I change mine, but I don't try to wipe the pan clean or anything. As far as filling the oil filter fill, it can't hurt - and as long as you can install without spilling it all out!
The thing about this is, that little bit of extra effort probably isn't worth what you put in... There should still be enough oil in the system that there is no real dry start while the filter fills. And the amount of dirt in the 4.5 ounces of used oil will be diluted and cleaned by the new filter as well.
But like I said, I've never gotten 276,100 miles...

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My neighbor across the street has a 96 Grand Am, 240K and still running strong

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that little bit ......it's like picking fly poop out of the pepper and putting oil in the filter is a no no as well as its now unfiltered .

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I'd rather put new oil into a filter than oil thats already in the engine. The second you put new oil into the engine, its dirty.

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What are you talking about? You put "clean" oil in the filter so the oil reaches the bearings and lubricates the system sooner. Hell even if new oil isnt clean any oil is better than no oil the few seconds of it running. I do the same Harry does with the filter and then I use the clear flood mode to build oil pressure before I actually start the engine.
says...

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I've been pre-filling my oil filters for decades - it cuts down on the time it takes for the oil pump alone t do it. You should ALWAYS lubricate an O-ring seal (or even a flat O-ring) before installing it to avoid damaging the seal and creating leaks (I use vaseline (or clean motor oil) to lube the ones in the fuel system). NEVER use a wrench to tighten a spin-on oil filter.
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Rich B wrote: Never use a wrench to tighten a spin on filter.
I've used that plastic cap wrench for the last 18 years to tighten filters.
On my 73 Impala & 68 LeSabre ( PF 25? ) I could get two hands on the filter to tighten the filter, never needed to use a wrench when installing, only to remove the filter. The LeSabre filter I changed from up above. It was mounted horizontal on the front passengerside of the engine.
Only had 1 hand tightened filter come loose. I must not of give it that final twist. One morning I started the LeSabre up, went back in the house because I forgot the walleto, come back out and see a huge puddle of oil pouring out of a running vehicle. Quickly run over and shut the car off. Luck it didn't loosen up when I left & got on the highway.
On my 78 Olds 88, 89 Z- 24 and Bonneville your lucky if you can even get one hand on it. These car use a PF 47, the pudding cup fllter as I call it, but the Z24 could also accomodate the longer PF - 52 which is what I ended up using on that car. The PF52 might of fit the Olds, but at the time I had the Olds I wasn't aware of there being a larger filter.
On the Bonneville I had to construct an oil Splash shield to be used when removing the filter. The filter is mounted above the frame rail and after the first few oil changes without it oil ran all over the place when it hit the frame rail, plus the hot oil stripped off what ever undercoating / paint GM put on the frame rail.
I wonder what kind of things I'll have to make when I buy the next car?
========Harryface ======== 1991 Pontiac Bonneville LE, 3800 V6 _~_~_~_~276,100 miles_~_~_ ~_~_
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Harry wrote:

I bet you are going to keep on using it on another car or two until you get it paid off.
---Bob Gross---
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What do you mean by, "clear flood mode?" I'd love to hear more about this as I always hate cranking over the engine for the first time after an oil change. If I can find a way to build oil pressure before starting, I'd be very happy!
Many thanks for any info!!
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@yahoo.com says...

It only works on fuel injected cars. Turn key on to the run position first, then press gas pedal "all the way" to to the floor and crank (15sec max). No or nearly no fuel gets injected into the engine. However if you got a leaking injector get ready to let your foot of the gas because it will start and take off reving.
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Many thanks for the explanation. I'll do that as well from now on.
Thanks again!
Rick
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I had trouble doing this with my 1994 Buick PA and 1994 Silhouette. I'm not sure if has to do with the newer computer or not. This worked great on my 1986 Delta 88 and 1987 Buick GN. I know the '86 Olds and '87 GN used the same computer (just different chips and cal paks). I don't know much about the '94 computers, though.
Bill
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Dont have thick floor mats under your pedals do you? Your computer has to see WOT after you key is on.
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wrote:

It only works on fuel injected cars. Turn key on to the run position first, then press gas pedal "all the way" to to the floor and crank (15sec max). No or nearly no fuel gets injected into the engine. However if you got a leaking injector get ready to let your foot of the gas because it will start and take off reving.
how is this different from just running the car for 15 seconds?
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snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com says...

What rpm is the engine turning at when cranking and what rpm is it turning at when it first fires up? If you start an engine and it hits 1000rpm and you dont have oil pressure for 3 seconds or more how healthy do you think that is for it? The point is to push air out of the filter and the rest of the system and to make sure oil is coating everything when you start it. The 15 seconds max was just a stopping point so no one overheats their starter motor.
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SO am I correct in assuming that this is equivalent to removing the coil wire on an old car and cranking the engine?
Basically it sounds like you're just trying to crank the motor at a relatively low RPM while you get oil pressure built up, right?
Thanks!!
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@yahoo.com says...

No because you still get spark with clear flood mode, just no or little fuel. Careful with coils, they need to discharge their spark somewhere.

Yes.
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Ah, yes, obvious point. I should have realized that.

OK, at least I understood that part correctly.
Thanks!
Rick
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