Pinprick hole in power steering hose -please help!

I have a tiny pinprick hole in my metal tubular power steering hose. Is there a simple way to plug this hole? Is there a special glue or sealant I
can use? To replace the hose looks like a very difficult task. I want an easy and cheap way to fix it. Thanks, Nino
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Funny thing about fluid power, it will always find the path of least resistance. If you line has a hole from rust, even if you do plug it, another one will pop out soon after. Bite the bullet, replace the line. Depending on the year/make/model of vehicle, it could cost as little as $10 to replace. On the other hand, it could cost over $100. Maybe a patch is in order? Replace only the offending section of line.
Steve

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Temporarily "saddle" the tube with a hose (split open with the slit opposite the hole) and use a clamp to tighten the hose around the tube and against the hole.
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On Fri, 14 Oct 2005 00:31:56 GMT, "Nino NoSpam"

The easiest and cheapest way to repair the leaking steel is to replace the whole hose. Even if you were to stop the leak by means of a sealer or hose type cover, more likely than not the leak would just start somewhere else on the hose assembly. If you want to waste money on repairs that may or may not work, only to most likely have to replace the hydrolic line and clean up a larger mess, good luck. You get what you pay for.
...Ron -- 68' Camaro RS 88' Firebird Formula 00' Mustang GT Vert
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Nino NoSpam wrote:

You don't say what type of beater this is, but I understand your plight. The post suggesting clamping a rubber patch over the hole with a hose clamp would probably work fine. You could use a piece of rubber from a bike tube. I stopped a similar leak on a neighbor's old Taurus using the two part epoxy that you knead in your hands and then stick on. The best way is to make a complete circle with the material around the leak area. They sell this stuff in auto stores as gas tank or radiator patch. Hardware stores sell something similar. The repair I made appears to be permanent after a year of service.
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