Pontiac Grand Prix Brake Pad Replacement & Brake Fluid Bleeding Guides

I just spent most of last Sunday replacing the brake pads on all four wheels of my 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix. I also bled the brake lines since the brakes were exhibiting a lot of "fade" during heavy stops.
These were fairly simple procedures if you have some automotive knowledge. I probably saved at least a few hundred dollars by doing the work myself.
The brake pads were $47 for the front two wheels and $31 for the rear wheels. The brake fluid, brake cleaner and anti-squeal gel added another $20 to the total cost.
Any General Motors vehicle from Pontiac, Chevrolet, Cadillac, Oldsmobile, Saturn or Buick should have very similar braking components. The bolt sizes or bleeder valve locations may vary.
Here are the guides below.
Front Brake Pads - http://www.paulstravelpictures.com/GM-Pontiac-Grand-Prix-Front-Brake-Pads-Replacement-Guide/index.html
Rear Brake Pads - http://www.paulstravelpictures.com/Pontiac-Grand-Prix-Rear-Brake-Pads-Replacement-Guide/index.html
Brake Line Bleeding - http://www.paulstravelpictures.com/GM-Pontiac-Grand-Prix-Brake-Lines-Bleeding-Guide/index.html
I hope some of you find the guides helpful and are able to save some money working on your own cars.
Cheers, Paul Michaels Ft. Lauderdale, FL
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Yeah that's just what we need, every halfwit driver being able to service thier own brakes. That'll be really handy once the snow comes round again.
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Spoken by a completely clueless individual. Please advise in just what manner anyone doing something as simple as a brake job poses a threat - regardless of snow. I presume you take your car to the shop for something like this, simply because it must be safer that way...
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I was curious about this odd post too. Maybe he is a mechanic and doesnt want any competition.
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You need less braking power in the snow. Maybe this was the idiot that I saw off the road, twice in the same day. Going to work in the AM and later that day on the way home.
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Does look that way... After all, in the snow brakes are basically useless anyway! It is dry pavement braking that is the most demanding.
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That thought occurred to me also. That would be even more pathetic than if he was simply clueless.
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Speaking of halfwits, you manage to use the computer quite well, with just one problem. You come off as an asshole. Please try better next time. And Paul, thank you for the guide. It's always great when someone does a photo journal of a repair. It makes it a lot easier for the rest of us!! Keep up the good work.
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And

Fully agree...
I dont agree with a previous poster that brakes are basically useless in the snow. Good tires, brakes that perform well and are in balance, and antiskid systems can save you life....but the driver himself is the most important part of the scenario.
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Paul has done a good job of documenting all of the work he's done on his car(s). Valuable information for those who may be attempting repairs for the first time. Alas - if only he realized what a hazard he really is to the motoring public...
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Paul , thanks this was great , even though i dont have this model of Pontiac , it's gives the basics for pretty well every Gm model around your year of vehicle , nice to see everything in clear pictures to assist you as well.
I've been doing my own brakes and other repairs for many years and it's not always easy finding clear pictures and instructions for what you have to do.
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The slimy looking stuff in the brake reservoir shows that the fluid change was *waaaaay* overdue. Now IIRC GM and Ford doesn't recommend a flush schedule, at least years ago. If people keep their cars over the typical 3-4 year period the marketing types suggest, then that would be fine. But for others every year to 2 years max the system should be flushed. Especially in humid Florida.
I would put a block of wood while doing the manual pumping method to help avoid damaging the master cylinder piston cups in the less used portion of the bore.

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