Re: Foreign cars pass Big 3. but not on a steep grade

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How do you like your SUV?
mike


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Mike Hunter wrote:

You're not a good comedian either.
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Mike Hunter wrote:

Hmmm, then why are fatality rates higher for pickup trucks and SUVs than they are for passenger cars?
"The traffic safety agency reported last week that there were 16.42 deaths of S.U.V. occupants in accidents last year for every 100,000 registered S.U.V.'s. The figure for passenger cars was 14.85 deaths for each 100,000 registered; pickups were slightly higher than cars at 15.17 deaths per 100,000, while vans were lowest at 11.2 occupant deaths for every 100,000 registered. "
From:
http://www.autosafety.org/article.php?scid 6&did”9
John
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You need to go by deaths for every 100,000,000 mi driven, rather than deaths per 100,000 vehicles. People may put more miles on one type of vehicle than another type.
SUVs have more problems with turnovers during crashes than cars.
Jeff

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Duh, the average car seat 5 the average SUV seats 7. ;)
mike

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I'm glad you said in my opinion. One of the primary reasons the Senate has been reluctant to up the CAFE for light trucks is the report form the NHTSA that shows deaths and injures among children had been dropping over the past five years. The drop was attributed to the fact more of them are riding, properly belted, in the larger safer SUVs that buyers prefer to buy. ;)
mike hunt

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wrote:

and transport 'em all in armored cars !
no...NO.... Abrams TANKS.
<rj>
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With thirty years experience as an automotive design engineer, designing vehicles, and working on crumple zones, you can bet the farm I do. Any fool who does not understand, the large the vehicle in which a properly belted passenger is riding, the safer they are is.......well a fool. One can not defy the laws of physics. Search the Congressional Record, for the facts you seek, WBMA. ;)
mike hunt

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You are free to believe whatever you wish, I will not waste my time doing homework for a fool ;)
mike

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As an engineer, you know that the laws of physics also mean that if a huge SUV hits a small car, the the occupants of the smaller car are in proportionaly more danger than the SUV occupants, which of course you already know. Whereas, if a small car hits another small car, then there is less mass and less energy of motion to be absorbed by the cars and their occupants, but of course smaller cars have less metal for use as crumple zones. Are the odds of people getting hurt by crashing 2 small cars together higher/more than that of 2 larger SUV type vehicles crashing? And obviously, a crash between an SUV and a GEO Metro is unfortunate, and the odds of the Metro driver getting hurt are high.
-
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Mike Hunter wrote:

Then why is it that before we got so many SUVs on the road, the US was #1 in highway safety in the world, but now we're around #7?
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DUH, the US has 235,000,000 vehicles on more highways than any four counties in the world.
mike hunt

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Quite likely - with the obvious exception of your typo above.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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Mike Hunter wrote:

I'm obviously not referring to the numbers of deaths and injuries but their rates. Why did we go from having the lowest rates to the seventh lowest?
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Mike Hunter wrote:
Perhaps it is because they have enough sense to not buy a small less safe vehicle in which to transport their family, simply save a few hundred dollars a year on fuel? _________________________________________________
"John Horner" wrote:
Then why are fatality rates higher for pickup trucks and SUVs than they are for passenger cars?
"The traffic safety agency reported that there were 16.42 deaths of S.U.V. occupants in accidents last year for every 100,000 registered S.U.V.'s. The figure for passenger cars was 14.85 deaths for each 100,000 registered; pickups were slightly higher than cars at 15.17 deaths per 100,000, while vans were lowest at 11.2 occupant deaths for every 100,000 registered. " _________________________________________________
Apples to oranges. Mike referred to the safety risk of small cars, and you refer to the safety risk of all cars.
Imagine a 60 MPH head-on collision between a 5000 Lb RoadMaster and a 2000 Lb Gas-Saver. After colliding, the R/M would have been slowed to 45 MPH and the G-S would be shooting backward at 15 MPH. An R/M passenger who didn't buckle his seat belt would hit the dashboard at (60-45) = 15 MPH. A G-S passenger who didn't buckle his seat belt would hit the dashboard at (60+15) = 75 MPH. No collision is perfectly elastic, some energy would be absorbed by car body crushing, but you get the picture.
I believe cars have been commoditized, like refrigerators, and that one is about as good as the other, so there is no reason to be committed to either foreign cars or to domestic cars. This gives a buyer the flexibility and the freedom to choose a vehicle based on his own judgement. It is not necessary to justify one's own choices for value and safety by moralizing about some else's preferences,
Best regards to all alt.autos enthusiasts.
Rodan.
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