Re: In-the-tank fuel pumps cause death and destruction

Page 6 of 8  
Gasoline vapor, but not a combustible mixture. Even when the gauge shows empty, the contacts are still in the fuel.
mike hunt
Ken Weitzel wrote:


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Are you sure? The pick up is under fuel, but is the pump completely under fuel ? The "contacts" are in the top of the pump, so exposed to tank atmosphere. Being no O2 or not enough to support combustion.........moot point.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Fuel vapour in a concentration much to rich to burn. (in other words - mabee a teensy weensy little bit of air mixed with a LOT of raw fuel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Al Smith wrote:

Not true. For example, the Chrysler LH vehicles have an access panel in the trunk floor that allows the fuel pump module to be pulled out the top of the tank. Niether draining the tank nor removing the tank is required. However, the intelligence not to do something idiotic like use an open-bulb drop light, smoke, or strike a match while working on it is required. Something that seems beyond the capability of entirely too many people these days....
And yes, most PICKUP TRUCKS with electric in-tank pumps do require dropping the tank or removing the bed from the chassis... however this article doesn't say whether it was an in-tank pump or a 1965 pickup with a conventional fuel pump. If you are stupid in replacing an old-style fuel pump, you can wind up with a garage full of fuel just as easily as you can if you're stupid with an in-tank pump. The key word is STUPID...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mic Canic would get a clue
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And thus I present to him the Darwin Award.
--
Scott Ehardt
http://www.scehardt.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 00:52:44 GMT, "Scott Ehardt"

Now if he was going back in "to save a dog" he'd be a typical Darwin winner.
Just a shame that no one has invented a "fire extinguisher" yet to deal with such a circumstance. Though I suppose working with Gasoline, a fire is the last thing you'd suspect. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can't legislate against stupidity. If you follow some basic safey precautions there is very little danger. I'm not a professional mechanic and I have changed out 3 in tank fuel pumps with no problems. This is as stupid as the folks trying to blame Honda for fires caused by mechanics who didn't check for the old filters gasket when doing an oil change. ---------------- Alex
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Right ON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! brother. Does not matter if the stupidity occures in a garage or on the internet.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You don't think there were fuel fires when people replaced external fuel pumps, or tank, or lines, or filters?
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
POPPY COCK!!!!! what a crock,,,ok lets put the fuel pumps outside the tank, Where should we put the fuel Sending unit???? Ever thought maybe the person working on the car didnt know what they were doing???? I wonder if maybe they were using a drop lite next to the tank to see what they were doing and maybe the pressurized fuel hit the bulb and ignited the fuel? Mcdonalds got sued for having coffee scold someone, coffee has been hot for how many yrs??? should me make coffee cold now
Glenn Beasley Chrysler Tech
A Google search found two serious fires, happening on the same day, one fire causing death and the other perhaps a million dollars damage as a result of servicing in-the-tank fuel pumps. Had these fuel pumps been placed externally, as the usual and proven practice for more than 70 years, these accidents would have been prevented. Legislation is badly needed to address this serious design deficiency as professional mechanics as well as amateurs are exposed to deadly danger by a totally unnecessary fuel system configuration. In the meantime, lawyers should file a class action as all manufacturers are currently using dangerous in-tank pumps and millions of cars are affected. This suit is worth billions and billions. At the very least, all cars should be retrofitted with new tanks and external pumps by mechanics wearing fire suits and guarded by fire crews. The changeover will save hundreds of lives and much damages while costing much deserved hundreds of millions of dollars of expense to the responsible capitalist titans, all of whom are totally devoid of industrial ethics.
News Story One:
Thursday, October 28, 2004 Last updated 4:11 a.m. PT
Inhalation of toxins blamed for Des Moines fire death
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DES MOINES, Wash. -- A man who died in a garage fire after gasoline spilled out of a truck that was being repaired died partly from inhaling toxic fumes, investigators said.
David E. Russ, 61, identified Wednesday as the dead man, also had burns on more than 90 percent of his body, investigators in the King County medical examiner's office said.
Russ and two other men was trying to replace the fuel pump on a pickup truck Monday when the leaking fuel caught fire as the trio tried to push the truck out of a detached garage.
All three ran outside, but Russ went back in and was trapped when the roof collapsed, Fire Battalion Chief Victor Pennington said.
News Story Two:
Local auto dealership heavily damaged in fire By Virgil Cochran Lamar Daily News
Thursday, October 28, 2004 -
Tri-County Ford on Highway 50-287 north of Lamar was severely damaged by a midmorning fire yesterday, but the manager Jeff Travis said the business will be up and running again in just a few days.
Travis and Prowers County Rural Fire Chief Marvin Rosencrans said the fire began when mechanics were attempting to drain a fuel tank on a vehicle in the mechanic shop to replace a fuel pump. A fuel transfer pump developed an electrical short, which triggered the blaze.
It rapidly engulfed the shop area of the building, but everyone managed to get out safely, Travis said.
Tri-County will have temporary office trailers set up on the lot by next week, Travis said, and will be open for sales of new and used vehicles. In the meantime, all automobiles for sale will remain on the lot, and customers are welcome to drop by and shop, and even negotiate deals. But the business won't be able to finalize deals until the temporary offices are set up and computer equipment is up and running again next week.
Travis said Tri-County is also negotiating for temporary headquarters for its mechanic shops, but it may be a few more days before the shop functions of the business are up and running.
Eight cars in the service area were destroyed and the service garage itself was heavily damaged if not totally destroyed, but Rosencrans said damage to the office and parts storage area was limited to mostly smoke and water damage.
Local firefighters were called to the scene about 10:40 a.m. yesterday, and the Prowers Rural Fire Department was assisted by the Lamar, Wiley, and Holly Fire Departments.
As for the existing building, Travis said the business was well insured and that he would meet with insurance adjusters sometime today.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When A liar, i mean lawyer sees a chance to make money, this is what you get
A Google search found two serious fires, happening on the same day, one fire causing death and the other perhaps a million dollars damage as a result of servicing in-the-tank fuel pumps. Had these fuel pumps been placed externally, as the usual and proven practice for more than 70 years, these accidents would have been prevented. Legislation is badly needed to address this serious design deficiency as professional mechanics as well as amateurs are exposed to deadly danger by a totally unnecessary fuel system configuration. In the meantime, lawyers should file a class action as all manufacturers are currently using dangerous in-tank pumps and millions of cars are affected. This suit is worth billions and billions. At the very least, all cars should be retrofitted with new tanks and external pumps by mechanics wearing fire suits and guarded by fire crews. The changeover will save hundreds of lives and much damages while costing much deserved hundreds of millions of dollars of expense to the responsible capitalist titans, all of whom are totally devoid of industrial ethics.
News Story One:
Thursday, October 28, 2004 Last updated 4:11 a.m. PT
Inhalation of toxins blamed for Des Moines fire death
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DES MOINES, Wash. -- A man who died in a garage fire after gasoline spilled out of a truck that was being repaired died partly from inhaling toxic fumes, investigators said.
David E. Russ, 61, identified Wednesday as the dead man, also had burns on more than 90 percent of his body, investigators in the King County medical examiner's office said.
Russ and two other men was trying to replace the fuel pump on a pickup truck Monday when the leaking fuel caught fire as the trio tried to push the truck out of a detached garage.
All three ran outside, but Russ went back in and was trapped when the roof collapsed, Fire Battalion Chief Victor Pennington said.
News Story Two:
Local auto dealership heavily damaged in fire By Virgil Cochran Lamar Daily News
Thursday, October 28, 2004 -
Tri-County Ford on Highway 50-287 north of Lamar was severely damaged by a midmorning fire yesterday, but the manager Jeff Travis said the business will be up and running again in just a few days.
Travis and Prowers County Rural Fire Chief Marvin Rosencrans said the fire began when mechanics were attempting to drain a fuel tank on a vehicle in the mechanic shop to replace a fuel pump. A fuel transfer pump developed an electrical short, which triggered the blaze.
It rapidly engulfed the shop area of the building, but everyone managed to get out safely, Travis said.
Tri-County will have temporary office trailers set up on the lot by next week, Travis said, and will be open for sales of new and used vehicles. In the meantime, all automobiles for sale will remain on the lot, and customers are welcome to drop by and shop, and even negotiate deals. But the business won't be able to finalize deals until the temporary offices are set up and computer equipment is up and running again next week.
Travis said Tri-County is also negotiating for temporary headquarters for its mechanic shops, but it may be a few more days before the shop functions of the business are up and running.
Eight cars in the service area were destroyed and the service garage itself was heavily damaged if not totally destroyed, but Rosencrans said damage to the office and parts storage area was limited to mostly smoke and water damage.
Local firefighters were called to the scene about 10:40 a.m. yesterday, and the Prowers Rural Fire Department was assisted by the Lamar, Wiley, and Holly Fire Departments.
As for the existing building, Travis said the business was well insured and that he would meet with insurance adjusters sometime today.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AMEN to that!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 01:30:02 +0200 (CEST), Nomen Nescio
etc, etc, etc....
There are a couple of reasons to put the pump in the tank, neither of which involve the motivations of "greedy corporations". A mechanical pump won't deliver the PSI needed for fuel injection so the only other option is electric. The electric pump has to be cooled and the gas in the tank surrounding the pump acts as the coolant. Those articles merely highlight the fact that incompetent techniques of incompetent "mechanics" can manage to ruin anything if given enough time and opportunity. When I was a kid I used to work in a place where one of the "mechanics" actually managed to set fire to a car while removing the mechanical fuel pump.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 20:29:22 GMT, MisterSkippy

fuel pumps and they typically deliver up to 60 PSI regulated and can be forced to deliver much, much more pressure...My solution to the explosion hazard discussed here is this: drain the tank and displace the 02 by injecting nitrogen (very common in shops) into the tank and BE CAREFUL. No technique substitutes common sense.
BTW, I'm an ex diesel mechanic, now an EE...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 31 Oct 2004 19:56:28 GMT, Gorlvod Clutchesnuts

Plonk!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 02 Nov 2004 19:51:31 GMT, MisterSkippy

Yea well at least I don't go around talking about stuff I don't know about like I'm some kind of expert. You're just pissed cause someone caught you at being the quack that you are. STFU and lurk because you don't know shit.
PLONK? LOL, you LOSER!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

Where does the fuel pressure to start the engine come from?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
GorlvodClutchesnuts

http://www.aftermarketbusiness.com/aftermarketbusiness/article/articleDetail.jsp?idw013
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
actually a FULL gas tank is safer because of less fumes in the tank

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.