Re: Our customers dont know this is going on, and they dont care

They will probably see improved quality when the new workers hit the line interested in keeping the job and interested in doing a quality job. Far
better than the old union employees more interested in how they can increase lazy time and no longer interested in the quality of the work they are doing. Don't forget it is those union employees that have been putting out the shoddy workmanship that has put GM in the low end of quality.

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080607/AUTO01/806070338/1148
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Woody, you are an idiot. Have you ever worked on the line at GM? How can you blame a line worker for GM designing bad gasket's (for example)? They only put together what some highly paid top brass guy designs.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
80 Knight, you almost have it right. The design was probably developed at a lower echelon and would have worked fine. Then upper management/bean counters said do it cheaper.
80 Knight wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If GM wants to survive they have to redesign their operations form top to bottom. They have at least twice the manpower they need to build the cars they can build and they can build a hell of a lot more cars than they can sell. They could start by setting a capable person at the top. Give him free range of hiring officers and all the way down to the bottom. In order to do that all current employees would get a few months notice and be able to apply for a job at the "new" GM. If they do not do that they may as well close the shop straight away.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gosi turned on the Etch-A-Sketch and wrote:

Oh, yeah, I'm sure that'll go over well for morale.
IIRC, some aerospace company did just that back in teh '80s. They "fired" everyone and asked them to apply for position in the company - they could be teh same position, higher or lower.
The only two "problems" with GM aren't the line staff.
I'd say it was that you had a bean counter (lutz) in charge for several years and that they worry about the stock price on a quarterly basis.
The Japanese, Korean and other car makers don't worry about things on a quarter by quarter basis - they think long-term.
--
www.perfectreign.com || www.filesite.org

powered by the lizard: www.opensuse.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you want to install new technology and it means fewer people working with same or more output it can mean fight with the unions. Lets say you need 1/3 of the people the unions try to keep everyone aboard. If GM can not do it others will so either they have to lose a lot of people and stay in business or lose all the people.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gosi turned on the Etch-A-Sketch and wrote:

There are ways around that. I work for a union shop (LA County) and have done workforce reductions. You just have to go about it the right way.
You implement the new technology and don't say jack about staff reductions. You simply mention that there are "cost efficiencies." You then work with line management to make sure that when someone leaves, you simply don't replace the person. In the next budget cycle, you simply remove the item from the budget.
It may take longer but the union has no issues, since staff are doing the same or less work and the costs go down. The only thing the union *can* gripe about is a loss of revenue as a result of less union dues being paid. However, that isn't a valid labor management complaint.

--
www.perfectreign.com || www.filesite.org

powered by the lizard: www.opensuse.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Unfortunately customer satisfaction in the media is measured only on new sales in the first few months of service. These problems are caused by poor work on the assembly line. Otherwise how does Honda have a high reliability rating with 25 % of their Ody transmissions failing by 100 k miles, many under 50k.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Who determines how a vehicle will be assembled? Who has to live with those decisions and assemble the vehicle?
Who decides that the production count is more important than quality? Who gets blamed when quality drops?
Who changes the inspection tags on baskets of parts from fail to pass? Who gets blamed?
The people on the plant floor do their best to put out a quality product despite management's decisions.
Been there & did that for 40 years.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Speak softly and carry a loaded .45 Lifetime member; Vast Right Wing Conspiracy Web Site: www.destarr.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think this is a key point... To have an excellent product, the company has to be organized and working effectively and efficiently from top to bottom. Upper management often loses sight of the goal, when awash in their sea of hubris. By the same token, the lower levels may not be able to see the problems that the guys at the top see.
Nonetheless, some companies DO manage to organize, perform, and demand excellence.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One problem is communication up the ladder; there isn't any. When one of the VP's visits a plant, carefully selected people are handed written "questions" to ask. No one else is allowed to speak. Downward communication sucks, too. The guys in Detroit wouldn't can send a message to the plants. By the time it gets there, they wouldn't recognize it as their words. Budgets are a joke, too. In a component plant, the budget is based on so many cents per part produced, and drops over the years. As machinery ages, maintenance costs go up, but the maintenance budget shrinks. When I retired in 05, the machines in my plant were 27 years old. The maintenance budget was less than 50% of what it was when the plant started up. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Speak softly and carry a loaded .45 Lifetime member; Vast Right Wing Conspiracy Web Site: www.destarr.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Starr turned on the Etch-A-Sketch and wrote:

That is horrible!!
I'm part of senior management for LA County. There *has* to be communication between line staff and management for anything to work. I make a point to perform MBWA on a regular basis.
I know also that executive management also does the same. Various board members will occasionally visit and simply walk around - there's no scripting or anything.
--
www.perfectreign.com || www.filesite.org

powered by the lizard: www.opensuse.org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Every now & then we'd be visited by the VP that headed our division. Everyone not involved got a big hoot out of the impending visit. The tour route would be mapped out & everything you could see from the route was cleaned & painted. People chose to make a presentation on their area would have to submit their speech in writing, to be gone over by the higher ups. Then, there'd be at least 2 dry runs to make sure everything would go as planned. As the tour group moved through the plant, our superintendent would scurry down the aisles ahead of the group, picking up pieces of paper & cigarette butts so the big guy wouldn't see them. People - out of sight of the tour - were rolling on the floor laughing when he put one that was still lit in his pants pocket. :-)
The absolute pinnacle of stupidity was back in the early 80's when Roger Smith headed GM. We were a new plant then, operating under a new concept. No time clocks, supervisors stayed in their offices unless they were called to the floor, the people running the machines made more decisions than the supervisors. This lasted about 2 years. Anyway - when word came down that Roger was visiting, upper management began a "competition" among the salary staff. The "winner" got the "privilege" of carrying Roger's briefcase and following him as he toured the plant. I think the "winner" got a gold star pasted on his forehead, too. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Speak softly and carry a loaded .45 Lifetime member; Vast Right Wing Conspiracy Web Site: www.destarr.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Back about 1965 I was a production scheduler for a company owned by the conglomerate ITT. One day the CEO, Harold Geneen was going to visit the main office and plant, about 2 miles from our plant. They did exactly as you describe with the cleaning and painting. He was to arrive early in the morning.
What happened though was he came into town the night before. I happed to be working late and was going to leave when a limo pulls up out front. Instead of the main office, they happened by our division up the road and saw the sign so figured that was the place. When approached, I just met him and he said he'd like to see the plant so I gave him a tour of our facility. We left together and I went home; just another day for me. The next morning, I was approached by all the managers from the main office with a load of questions. What did he see? What did he ask? What did he say? At the time, I was unimpressed, but later realized what they were planning to show off. I still laugh when I think about it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

While my motivation in responding is NOT because I'm pro union (because generally I am not)... but you are mistaking that GM is at the bottom of the quality chain. Have you read ANYTHING in the last two years?
GM now ranks on top in initial quality in many respects. Not to say the Honda, Toyo and Nissan aren't still excellent (along with their respective premium brands) but the durability and driving satisfaction is almost as good for a Pontiac, Buick or Chevy as it is for those we used to call "imports".
Having personally owned 13 Nissan's, and then most recently, a Chevy Impala and an Equinox, my experience with the Chevy products have been outstanding. Furthermore, the general service costs much less than any of my Nissan product. Not to say that I didn't find my Maxima's and Murano's a little more exciting, but I'm clearly spending less all the way around for the Chevy's, and am yet to have a repair of any kind.
Willy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.