Re: Tough technical questions



the
Loctite 609 would be a better choice, IMO. 495 is just common super glue, and would probably not be suitable for use on oil seals.

without
Yes
If the taper is greased, removal is

assembly,
I agree with the "clean and dry". If you are worried about it loosening on the shaft, you could always heat the sprocket in a pan of water before assy, then immediately torque the nut down. A little 242 on the threads would keep the nut from loosening. H
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says...

I would clean the parts and then add a thin layer of grease. Then torque the bolt to specs. Even with gease, you will need a puller to get the sprocket off. Because it is a tapered press fit the sprocket will still move a bit up the taper. ------------ Alex
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Alex Rodriguez wrote:

I don't have an answer for the specific application, but from a design/engineering standpoint, I would follow the written procedure as far as grease or no grease. I say that because, unless there is a positive stop (a step), the stresses on a tapered fit will go up maybe an order of magnitude or more for the same bolt/nut torque, possibly stretching or breaking the sprocket if it was not designted for that stress (i.e., if it was designed assuming no grease).
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my adddress with the letter 'x')
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FYI....."cyanoacrylate" = Super Glue. while superglue bonds a lot of low stress applications, I do not think that the brittle properties of that adhesive will accomplish your desired task.
As far as I know the dry taper and the keyway is all you need. As long as the keyway fits snug into the shaft, part of it's purpose is to prevent rotation.

the
without
assembly,
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put a little silicon on the outide of the rubber coated seal and then you could pean it in a bit with a punch.....just another option.
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Use the rubber coated ones and the Permatex to help hold it. You will get galvanic action between the steel and aluminum with the non-coated ones. That's why the OEM ones are rubber coated to prevent that corrosion from happening. You don't want the cases to corrode and get pitted in the seal area after time goes by. A 2 stroke motor has retainer plates to hold the seals in as they have pressurized bottom ends, not a problem with a vented 4 stroke crankcase.
--
John
"anything you say can & will be misquoted & used against you"
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I suppose a seal with a slightly larger o.d. is not available? that would be the ideal option. The seal ought to need to be pressed or lightly hammered in to have any hope of reliable retention.

FWIW the standard practice for dealing with tapered-end rear axles with separate hubs (commonly used on Studebaker, AMC and others) is to install them clean and dry. They require a lot of force to separate when torqued to spec, so no worries there. I have heard tell of people lubing the tapers and subsequently splitting the cast iron hubs.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Precisely the point I was making.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my adddress with the letter 'x')
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Use a thin coat of Permatex clear silicone sealer/adhesive:
It would hold bananas to ice-cream and seal them as well. I use it on cars with problematic intake manifold front and rear seal leaks. A trick from drag racing days, with angle cut heads, and no way to use the manifold sealing strips.
I hope this helps?
Refinish King

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