Re: tranny oil change

Those B&M "add a drain plug" kits definitely ease the process of removing fluid without dropping the pan. In fact, the only time I ever used one,
it never quit leaking until I pitched the pan and scrounged up another one. The crummy plastic washer that supposedly crushes to seal the drilled bolt to the pan splits or doesn't seal well, and the plug has a tendency to loosen, particularly if it is oriented such that debris striking the undercarriage tends to hit it in the unscrew direction. I would definitely suggest welding (assuming a steel pan) and positioning it out of the way of obstacles. Actually, I would suggest biting the bullet and dropping the pan once a year, to avoid the constant headache of a cheap, leaky add-on drainplug.
If changing the fluid by disconnecting the the cooler's pressure line, I would suggest recruiting a buddy to continuously pour new ATF into the fill tube; I would not rely on placing the return line in a bucket of fresh fluid.
One other procedure exists, but it's a bit nasty (and may not even be recommended anymore, but was back in the day of the TH350 and derviatives): After dropping the pan, drill a 1/8" hole into the bulge around one of the converter's mounting lugs to drain the converter. Drilling in too far damages the converter. Using a *closed end* pop rivet, close the hole and apply sealer. If it leaks, you're screwed, as drilling out the rivet leaves a chunk in the converter, and that doesn't help things much. This, of course, only gives a finite number of fluid changes, and it's probably not in the best interest of reliability to amass a half-dozen pop rivets stuck in the TC. Not that I recommend this method, but it exists.
On Tue, 30 Mar 2004 18:00:15 -0700, Silver Surfer wrote:

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You could put a brass T in one of the lines and install a brass 1/4-turn valve in it. I use this method on my Suburban. I run the engine and remove a quart of fluid at a time (that is, drain a qt. out and add a qt. back in) I use a Mason jar to measure the fluid as I drain it out and you change all the fluid, not just the stuff in the pan. To keep from accidently draining the tranny, I put a screw-in plug in the valve. Rich B
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Consider synthetic fluid if your towing. Synthetic laughs at the heat that kills conventional fluid. As for a drain plug, once you have the pan off, weld a fine thread nut to inside of pan in an out of harm's way area. A short fine thread bolt, washer, and fiber washer will seal fine. I agree the B+M drain plug is a P O S, and I'd never use one.
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