Repairing Rusty Electrical Connectors

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Thanks for all the responses. At least most of them.
It looks like that I was too vague on what I was trying to do. The rust is on the 1/4" wide, male, blade connectors on the back of the heater switch.
They are plated steel. They are riveted to a phenolic block so it can handle heat ok. The rust remover took off most of the rust except what was in the pits. Sand blasting took care of this.
This is mostly a learning process for me. I may be able to find a good replacement switch, but I want to learn how to fix it in case a replacement was not available.
Thanks, Scott

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On those, I use new female connections and dielectric grease once the spades are cleaned up. The new female connectors will be nice and tight again. Alternately I have taken the female side out and carefully squeezed the side rails down to make them tight again.
The old pins can be removed from the plug using a mini screwdriver down the back side of them, then new female spades can be crimped back onto the wires and put back into the plug or just plugged on directly.
I have also soldered the spades to coat them with iffy success, you have to get 'all' the flux off or it will cause fast corrosion. I found the solder didn't want to go on evenly so it was a bugger to get the female side on over it and have it stay tight. The solder is pretty soft.... The solder works to hold the pin onto the rivet well though.
Mike 86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00 88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's Canadian Off Road Trips Photos: Non members can still view! Jan/06 http://www.imagestation.com/album/pictures.html?id !15147590 (More Off Road album links at bottom of the view page)
Scott Buchanan wrote:

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Ok, so after all this, why not just get a new heater switch? I think my old Jeep CJ7 uses the same switch and they are still available. Or just cut the bad spades off the thing and solder on some new ones. I have swiped (unsoldered) the spades from dead headlights for this very job.
Mike 86/00 CJ7 Laredo, 33x9.5 BFG Muds, 'glass nose to tail in '00 88 Cherokee 235 BFG AT's Canadian Off Road Trips Photos: Non members can still view! Jan/06 http://www.imagestation.com/album/pictures.html?id !15147590 (More Off Road album links at bottom of the view page)
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All this tinning and replating sure seems to be a painfully huge amount of work when one can just replace connectors or a switch, doesn't it?
-- ~~R.Banks
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Parts for these old cars are hard to come by. When you do find them they can be expensive. Besides, I like to fix things.

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Me too, that's why I mention a source for 'new' spade connectors.
My heater switch is currently broken on one Jeep. One spade rotted off (the power in one) so I have it unplugged with a small jumper for heater controls. I have to remove the dash to get at mine, it is too rusted to unscrew the bezel. I have the spade from a dead headlight waiting for me to get ambitious and open it up.
Mike
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I have used three different fluxes. The one that works best is Oatly Tinning flux. A dab on the work surface and the electrical grade solder flows well.

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