replacing steel brake lines??????

..............I just bought a car to run to work and back in.
its in great shape only 48,000 miles and the body is real good.............but one of the Steel brake lines is busted. and the others
don't look so good.
I'd like to do it my self to save the cash. but I'd like to know if im getting in over my head. Any body got any experiance working with these.
I called the local part stores and they all have stock striaght lines that I'd have to bend and flare. and the rest of the brake system I think i can easliy do by myself.
Thanks.
Brian
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bmaty wrote:

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You can do it piece by piece like that and have lots of fun if it's your first time. Or you could see about buying a complete set of lines for your mystery car that are already preformed. It cost much more, but might be worth it in time saved.
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I can't find anywhere that has the preformed lines................I've called all the local parts dealers and no luck.I've checked the GM website and no luck.I guess I'll call a GM shop in the morning.
---------------Sorry its a 92 cavalier 2.2l 48,00 miles--------------------.
Brian

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bmaty wrote:

You can probably buy almost correct lengths and not have to cut & flare. Double flaring is not easy and not fun (not for me anyways). Find our if your oem vehicle lines are either english or metric. If you do end up flaring, do lots of practice flares first.
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« Paul » wrote:

When i had to redo my old mazda, i went through all the scenarios you are. What i decided to do in the end was buy stock length lines with the fittings already on and bend them.
You carefully take off the old lines. YOu may have to cut them in a few spots. It depends. Then you use the contours of the old lines to pre bend as much as possible the new lines off the car. Then you carefully put the new lines on. Start at one end, and work your way to the other. Since you may have bought lines longer than the OEM, you might have to put a few loops or bends in them to reduce there length.
I was warned that to make a good double flair is an art, and the flair tool is not cheap either. So that's why i went the pre built route. The bender was not that much. Good luck. WHen you take one of the old lines off, take it down to the auto parts store to match up the thread and flair.
Bob
-
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Great you guys are the best I get right on that in the morning...........i hope this is going to save me lots of bucks I've read the HAYNES manual about bleeding lined and I've done it many times before on other cars but never replacing entire steel lines.........any tips on bleeding lines?
Brian

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bmaty wrote:

Gravity bleeding may work well in this situation, initially. Then do a regular pedal pump bleed. Don't let the ABS pumps or master cylinder run dry!
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« Paul » wrote:

I agree with Gravity bleeding, when everything is hooked up, jack up front of car, open rear bleeders, and let fluid drip out, takes about 10 minutes, use pans to catch, dispose of responsibly.
If bending up your own lines, here's some " starter " tips
Buy some small diameter copper tubing, from a hardware store, and use that to make practice bends before tackling the steel. Can also be used to make mock ups which an industrial hose bender can replicate from Auto Tubing. Check with snowplow shops and Sand and Gravel companies for an in house bender, flarer. Big rigs have lots of tubing, so do Backhoes and such . .095 Trimmer line [ weed wacker ] fits nicely into tubing, and can help prevent crimping. When kinks begin to form, use a light hammer to tap kink flush, continue bend a few inches down.
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If you want to try your hand at double lap flaring, AutoZone will lend you the correct tool for the job at no charge.
I was scared to do try it myself for the first time just a few months ago. It was a piece of cake.

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