Seat Vibration 2002 Buick Lasaber

We have eliminated the tires and wheels. My mechanic is saying that it is the control arm bushings. I concerned because the vibration only happens at 70+mph and can't be felt through the stearing wheel.
I feel it through the seat and can see arm rest vibrating. I thought that if it were in the front end I would feel it in the stearing wheel. thanks tom
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How did you eliminate the tires and wheels?

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Tires and rims were used from another car that I drove and did not experience the vibration. Put them on my car and the vibration is still there.
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snipped-for-privacy@dva.state.wi.us wrote:

Find another mechanic.
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we were both highly sensitive to non-smooth riding tires. The number 1 cause of vibration such as you describe, AFTER spin-balancing tires, was tires being out-of-round. Just because you tried 2 different tire sets doesn't eliminate this possibility. And it is easy to verify yourself. Your description indicates a rear vs. front end problem. Assuming so, check the rear tires for *out of round* ; remember, a box can be installed onto an axle, spin-balanced, and rotate smoothly--and yet it definitely won't ride smooth! Check them by raising them just an inch or so above ground. Lay an oil bottle (or 10-inch block of 2X4) squarely on its side and up close to a tire. Carefully spin the tire, by hand, and watch how close the tire's circumference approaches the stationary *reference object* as it rotates. High spots will narrow the gap, and low spots will widen the space(DUH!). If found out of round, have them trued and then balanced, and enjoy the quiet, smooth ride Lesabres are capable of. If all tires were so checked, my bet is a surprisingly high % of them would show excessive out-of-round. Such tires will often ride smoothly at all but certain speed-ranges. Only those w/o excessive runout will ride smoothly at all speed ranges. HTH, s
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Either way there are times the suspension components on one care can absorb tire/wheel eccentricities, other cars with alloy components cannot. Find a shop with the new Hunter road force variation type wheel balancer.

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Thx, Shep, for the enlightenment. Just for my info, what does this balancer look like? And, what (apparently) different principle(s) does it use as compared to more conventional balancers? Though I'm retired, I'm still quite sensitive to, and still greatly dislike, rough-riding tires. Gotta relate a short story to you: bought a *new* 2003 Sonoma in February, disliked the looks of the factory aluminum wheels and new tires, altho' they rode perfect at all speed ranges(unusual). Found a nicer-looking set of S-10 wheels with nice Michelins on a wrecked pickup in a wrecking yard for $250!!! Installed them and they ride better than the others, due to the Michelin's superior quality/design; plus, the unbelieveable part is they have NO vibration or out-of-balance symptoms--again, straight off a wrecked truck. Not my normal kind of luck. Thanks again for the info. s
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This balance applies a rolling force to the tires as they are spun, the variation in the construction of the tire also varies the force the tire exerts against the rollers, this translates into a degree of road force variation, overt a certain reading the tire cannot be compenasated for by any balancing and would be replaced. Semi retired here, 25 years with GM.

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