Seized Belt Tensioner

Is it common for the pivot point on a belt tensioner to seize? I was visiting a mechanic friend today who discovered the belt tensioner on my Park Avenue doesn't move more than an 1/8th inch..Certainly not enough
to slip the belt off. I don't actually need a belt just yet.
Looks like a little bit of work is involved seeing a coolant pipe runs through the tensioner bracket/housing. 3800V6
Meanwhile the 18 year old tensioner o the Bonneville swings freely.
harryface 91 Bonneville 318,253 05 Park Avenue 84,726
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Harry Face wrote:

Not real common but it does happen. The usual culprit is corrosion of the pot metal. You probably could free it using some PB Blaster or some break free. Then use a dead blow or rubber hammer to tap it and free it up. Get it loose enough to pull the belt and then go to work on it both ways. Get it freed up so the spring returns it freely and go from there.
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

Or it's possible the spring broke and jammed it.
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Replace it. They're not as hard to do as they look.
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Harry Face wrote:

running through them and a goofy set of plastic coolant elbow fittings that were prone to breakage during disassembly, but I checked on the 2005 VIN K and it appears that it is simply a regular tensioner assembly (or the coolant passages aren't mentioned or visible in the service info). I have not replaced a newer style tensioner to know personally. Anyway, the part is pretty pricey, and the labor calls for 1.4 hours, down from the 1.8 to replace the older style I'm familiar with.
--
Toyota MDT in MO

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Thanks for all the replies. I'll see if I can free it up by lubricating it and tapping on it first.
Toyota: This one does have the coolant tubes running through it.
Thanks again,
harryface 91 Bonneville 318,476 05 Park Avenue 84,789
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Should you decide to effect repairs yourself, you may find the following post (which also involved the removal of the multifuntion belt tensioner) for a '96 Regal of some value. http://preview.tinyurl.com/lk7j9u or http://preview.tinyurl.com/lvm2zc
Also:
http://members.cox.net/snuckfoe/images/Buick/Tensioner.jpg
http://members.cox.net/snuckfoe/images/Buick/Tensioner2.jpg
I would strongly advise against prying or hammering on the device as it looks considerably less than substantial.
I might also mention that my issue with extraction was related to a likely oversized o-ring (it was an otherwise quite routine, non-problematic part to repair), either stemming from utilizing the incorrect replacement part in a previous episode or an improperly designed OEM part. I was informed by the dealer parts department that the new o-ring (which was noticeably both smaller and thinner) was of a superceded part number, though that's not a conclusive determinant about whether there was actually any difference in either dimensions, materials construction or vendor.
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