The Drive-a-Toyota Act

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You must buy some junk cars. I consistently drive my cars upwards of 250,000 miles and have never had to put a tranny in one.

That is pure bull. Perhaps it is in the line of cars you buy, but that is far from a universal statement. Most GM trannys will easily go well over 200,000 with only the most modest of care.

Buy a GM if you want a solid tranny.
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Yeah. Too bad they're not attached to any cars by that point.
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wrote:

Silly...
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Surely thou jest.
The GM trans that are used by racers and hot rodders maybe-after they are rebuilt with all the Good Guy parts. Not stock GM trans in production cars. At least, not on a percentage basis.
The older Chrysler trans were pretty tough. I wouldn't say that of most of the FWD transaxles.
Neither the manufacturer nor the consumer is terribly determined to have a good transmission or anything else in vehicles today.
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Four paragraphs of assertion, not one single point of evidence, or even anecdotal experience. Contrasted to real world driving histories of GM transmissions, you claim does not stand up. GM trannies consistently stand up to 200,000 miles of every day use, even when completely ignored by their owners.
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The tranny on my last GM car did go bat at 115,000, but that is the first and only one that ever did and yes, I've put 150,000 miles or more on many of them. Fact is, any brand will have some repairs, but overall, the GM 4 speeds have been excellent. The last GM that I can recall needing work was the Powerglide in my father's 55 Chevy.
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Bill Putney wrote:

If it is so well understood, why don't you give us some references about the life of a battery pack?
Transmissions, engines, people - all have finite life times, too.
Jeff

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Jeff wrote:

You ever deal with computer UPS battery packs in a large company? Battery life is *much* more finite than automatic transmissions - very narrow bell curve.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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Bill Putney wrote:

The technology for most UPS's is lead acid battery.
The technology for hybrid cars is nickel hydride.
You are comparing Apples and Oranges.
Jeff

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Jeff wrote:

Life of NiMH batteries is limited to 800 to 1000 charge/discharge cycles - so end-of-life is predictable to a great extent.
If deep discharged, power capacity and useable life are greatly reduced after 200-300 charge/discharge cycles.
So - yeah - used market value should be affected quite a bit by answer to question "Were batteries replaced yet?".
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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Bill Putney wrote:

Except that hybrid cars don't deep cycle the batteries. And the batteries, according to the testing by Toyota, should be good for the life of the car.
<http://consumerguideauto.howstuffworks.com/hybrid-batteries-none-the-worse-for-wear-cga.htm
I suspect that Toyota knows far more about how long the batteries will last than either you or me.
Unless you can offer some authoritative information, I am not going to waste my time answering to an know-it-all who is, once again, wrong.
Jeff

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I hate hearing statements like that.
What that tells me is that Toyota says that when the batteries go out, by definition you've reached the end of life of the car.
That does NOT tell me that the batteries last a long time.
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Elmo P. Shagnasty wrote:

Perhaps you should read the referenced article before commenting on one sentence about the article.
There is no indication that the life of the batteries are a limiting factor to the life of the car. All indications are that the batteries do not wear out.
Jeff
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wrote:

Conventional wisdom says that batteries have a fairly limited life, as most people experience with UPS devices, cell phones, and re-chargeable batteries. The charge controller in the Prius is programmed to prevent the battery pack from discharging or charging past the optimal range. There are Prius in taxi service with over 200,000 miles, and Toyota has yet to sell a replacement battery pack other than for defects during warranty coverage or for collisions. The correct answer is "yes, the Prius battery pack has a finite life, but none of the Prius vehicles sold has reached the end of its useful life yet."
BTW, there are plenty of automatic transmissions with well over 200,000 miles that are still in good working condition as well.
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On Jul 5, 2:21 am, "Ray O" <rokigawaATtristarassociatesDOTcom> wrote:

Calendar life, not miles or cycles will probably determine battery life in these applications.
If no aftermarket develops, the price will be prohibitive, but JDM may be a source like on everything else.
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That suggests that you don't understand, and are making a WAG.

Why would there fail to be an aftermarket? There are lots of hybrids on the road already. If the battery packs do start to fail out of warranty, the niche need will certainly be filled.
There are already D-Cell NiMH batteries available in bulk. A backyard mechanic could replace the entire complement of batteries for under $1000.
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snipped-for-privacy@12.usenet.us.com wrote:

When you say D-cells - you mean flashlight-type D-cells? I doubt if the package is very efficient space (round hexagonal close packing vs. no intersticial spaces) or weight (each individual cell has its own no-value-added-as-far-as-energy shell) wise. Cost efficiency ($$/watt-hr) may also be lower, but you'd have to look at the numbers. In general, I would think larger and fewer number of whatever would be more bang for the buck, lb., cu. ft. Intermediate step towards that: UPS batteries.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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On 07/18/07 06:18 am Bill Putney wrote:

All the UPS batteries I've ever seen are lead-acid. Hardly a suitable replacement, if for no other reason than that the charging circuitry would have to be modified.
Perce
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Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

Oops - you are correct. Wasn't thinking.
Bill Putney (To reply by e-mail, replace the last letter of the alphabet in my address with the letter 'x')
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Yes
It sure looked like a bunch of round D cells in both the Honda and the Escape. Maybe the Gen-II Prius is different.

Sealed Lead Acid? Different form factor?
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