The GM VOLT! $41,000 For A 40-Mile Car! YOU SUCKERS READY TO BITE?

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I drove a '71 SuperBeetle and, as I was writing my initial post, I was recalling the slow, painful process of merging onto a highway in my Bug! LOL!

wrote:

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Lack of torque in small engines is a problem for many small and midget cars. It is torque, not HP, that gets you going and keep you going on grades. Many import brands wind up their engines so they can advertise higher HP ratings, but that kills the torque curve of the engine.
Electric motors on the other hand have their highest torque at start up and under increased load.
wrote:

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Low end torque is the preserve of the diesel engine.
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Clive


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Obviously you are not an electrician if that is what you choose to believe ;)
writes

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What do you want to discuss, series or parallel d.c. Or synchronous or asynchronous?
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Clive wrote:

Mikey only knows how to Short Circuit.
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Then you should know an electric MOTOR develops it greatest amount of torque at startup an under load. On the other hand a diesel ENGINE needs to be run up before it attain is maximum torque
writes

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Ignorance is bliss as they say. It all depends on the type of motor and the power and if a.c. The frequency. Further how are you planning to cool the motor/s?
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Dream on Mike, the Volt is never going to pull anything like a Cummins or Duramax diesel. Just isn't going to happen. The Volt would have to have 8 batteries and that is assuming the motors/frame could take it.
Even with 8 batteries, 40 miles witha boat? Come now...
Keep dreaming.
Or better yet, buy one!
On 30/07/2010 8:57 AM, Mike wrote:

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Because the same car (Vauxhall Ampere) will be here next year, our "What Car" magazine has road tested one and a few little facts have emerged. When the battery is 70% depleted, the petrol engine takes over power generation. The engine is a standard 1.4 litre Corsa engine, 74bhp, I don't know if the Americans have an equivalent of the Corsa, but by our standards it's a mini car. This is not said, but my experience on railway locomotives with electric transmission is 85% efficiency, which makes the Ampere (Volt) only 62.9bhp at the wheel. I've not seen one in the flesh, but the pictures make it look large compared to our normal cars and would if true, make the car very underpowered. The other items are a claimed CO2 of 40g/km which is obviously taking the charged battery into account. The magazine lists the following, Price 30,000 Power 149 bhp 0-62 9.0 seconds Top speed 100mph Economy 175 mpg Electric Motor 149 bhp Petrol Engine 74 bhp Torque 275 ft/lbs Battery Lithium-ion E-REV (Electric-Range Extender Vehicle). The same magazine also tests the Nissan Leaf and the Toyota Prius Plug in.
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Duh, as one would suspect, you did not understand the point being made. Nobody was comparing the Volt to a truck, dummy. The comparison was of the point where maximum torque is achieved from a given electric motor and the similar torque output of an engine of the same HP.
The engine that drives the Volts generator, runs continuously at 2,100 RPM because that is point here the HP/torque ratio is the most efficient. The electric motor that motivate the vehicle, on the other hand develops it maximum torque at startup and under the heaver load of a pulling a grade.
Unlike an engine, an electric motor produces its torque where torque is need most, at startup and under the heaver load of a pulling a grade. An electric motor is far more desirable than an engine under those same conditions which must be run up to a given RPM to reach its maximum torque. That is why the vehicle driven by an engine needs various numbers of gears, to take advantage of the torque, that gets you going and keeps you going on grades, and the horse power that is needed for speed.
If you ever drove a hybrid you would notice than when you clime a grade at speed, that the small engine, which is designer to run at a high RPM to develop more HP, is way over its torque curve. If the electric motor did not kick in the car could not maintain the desired speed.
If you drive in mountainous parts of the country you will notice the Pruis' pulls the grades at speed far better than the underpowered 4cy Corollas and Camry's that can not even maintain the speed desired.

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How is the motor being driven and indeed what kind of motor is it?

Only a diesel would have maximum efficiency at that rpm, a petrol engine would be nearer to 5-6000 rpm to be at the point of maximum torque and hp.

Depends on the type of motor used.

What is your opinion regarding the need for field diversion if a dc motor is used, or would you prefer gears?

Rubbish.
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writes

Baloney..A gasoline engine can be designed to peak where ever you need it to. The l-head engines of the 30's thru early 50's made huge amounts of torque at very low rpm's.
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It's simple physics backed up by the latest diesel engines. The flame front is so fast that unless the RPM is elevated then the burn is over before useful torque can be got from it. Vehicles from the 30s to the 50s very often had manual advance and retard that would allow for greater torque though at the cost of efficiency. On the other hand the flame front is much slower in a diesel and because fuel is still burning it allows up to five smaller injections of fuel so that the burn lasts much longer and as you'll know (if you understand i.c. Engines) there is no torque at TDC and maximum torque 90% beyond. As your buddies would say, go figure.
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Obviously you do not have an engineering background if you do understand the difference between the torque produced by an electric motor and a fueled engine. ;)
writes

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O.K. Lets cut to the quick. The engine being used is the engine that GM uses in the Opel and Vauxhall Corsa. It's peek torque is between 4000 and 4500 rpm, how do I know? My daughter drives one, it's in the handbook. That engine also produces 74 bhp or 55kW (same thing) at 6000 rpm. You were saying?
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How many times do you need to be told that an electric motor develops it peak torque at startup and under load, while the engine that runs the generator run constantly at the same RPM to charge the batteries, there are no GEARS involved, before you understand the difference, dummy?
writes

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What sort of motor/s are you looking at, a.c. or d.c.? If d.c., how is the armature configured with the field, series or parallel? If more than one motor is used how are they configured series or parallel? What do you do when the back EMF equals the supply? If a.c. What sort of inverter are you using? Is the motor synchronous or asynchronous? Are you able to answer any questions without the diatribe that you've uttered above?
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The Volt is what it is and you said you read a article concerning the Volt and its power train. Every thing I posted was factual, so what's you point?
writes

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Firstly you top post, which I have corrected, you put the answer before the question, or you would if you knew the answer, but as you don't you're just wasting my time.
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