Tire Pressure Monitor

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Dad wrote:


Nope, didn't say that did I would stop buying cars now did I. Truly an asinine statement for you to make wasn't it.
I was also stating the obvious - that there are a lot of drivers who routinely ignore important information fed to them via the dashboard. Just because the latest warning system has to do with tires is no reason to believe their behaviour will change one whit.

What happens next should be obvious. The engine stops. I can't tell you the last time I ran out of gas, but there are plenty of people who do. As I've restated several times now those people will ignore useful information provided them no matter the subject. I can't tell you why...maybe unlike you and me they don't appreciate the consequences of ignoring warning messages. Will they use a tire pressure gauge if it is in the glove compartment - most likely not. But having an unused analog gauge in the glove compartment is a whole lot cheaper than an unused analog tire pressure monitoring system installed in the car.

Unfortunately it is the thumpty thump or the loss of steering control will be the first warning sign most drivers will heed. Wish driver behaviour was more defensive, but in my experience most drivers react to the consequences of problems rather than anticipating them.

If you don't believe what should be obvious, just try a blind test.

It would appear to be your choice in responsible lifestyle given that it appeared at the end of your post.

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You really need to read a little better John, it wasn't a statement, it was a question. Is that the problem, someone, heaven forbid, questioned you supreme knowledge?

The obvious is that change seems to come hard for you as with those other drivers?

Allot of drivers and most drivers seem to be rather poor at driving in the manner you think they should. Thankfully I drive where most driver do a pretty fair job of avoiding problems. For those other drivers I have the unique ability to forsee problems that could be an incident and avoid them. Sort of like low tires and poor visability are indicators that I shouldn't be there when the accident happens.

Obvious like tire pressure monitoring systems do work?

I see you didn't care to answer how accurate the tire pressure monitoring systems can be, must be out of your knowledge base.

Not really, it is just a somewhat funny collections of words I keep in my compartment, but never use them for what they were intended. Get the point? You assume allot. Try to deal in facts, it's enlightening.

One thing I do try to avoid is not cross posting, this one got out of hand and will stop here for me.
--
Has Kindergarten started yet this year?



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Dad wrote:

Change where there is a defined benefit is a good thing. However the TPMS is a perfect example of an expensive gee-whiz technology with at best a minimal benefit.

Not sure what you are saying here.....a confusing statement at best.

I think you are saying that your driving skills are pretty good in this paragraph...??? Right???

Not sure what your point is with this statement.

I have no doubt that a tire pressure monitoring system can be accurate as accurate as a good hand held gauge. But if it goes out of calibration then it is not a reliable tool especially for less than sophisticated drivers. A TPMS does not offer much improvement in tire safety over a hand held guage for virtually all drivers in all driving situations. As I remember the TPMS became an issue after a very few drivers of inherently unstable vehicles (SUVs) had blowouts and they reacted the wrong way. A TPMS won't solve that problem.
I've got to ask about knowlege bases. That's a pretty fancy buzzword that just rolls off the tongue of many consultants in these parts. So tell me what a knowlege base looks like and how one can be inside or outside of one.

The fact is that you closed your message with that phrase. Apparently you give little thought to the meaning of words, since in your words: Never Use Them For What They Were Intended. Words are just so much attention getting filler.

I'm not sure this was an issue...

Don't know, are you looking for a scholarship?
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A couple of items that seem to be in confusion here. 1. The caddys need to know which sensor is reporting from what corner, hence the reprogramming requirement on a rim relocation. 2. The vette\caddy system is accurate to pounds pressure while the abs derived system is only proportionally accurate. In other words it comparing 1 tires rotating distance against the other tire. If you think about the amount of pressure loss needed to be useful as a "tool" then it's pretty much only usefull in warning of immnent disaster, not tire pressure monitoring.(they are talking about being able to detect a 20% loss of tire pressure as a usefull indicator)
John S. wrote:

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Bob I wrote:

I don't know much about the Public Citizen group, but the concerns they raise are enough to make me wonder how useful tire pressure information will be if the thresholds are as low as they describe. I'm also concerned about a statement by that group that the systems do not have to work with replacement tires. And apparently the final rule says the systems need not measure tire pressure until a motorist has been driving between 30 and 60 miles per hour continuously for 20 minutes. If true, TPMS with that threshold of operation would be useless in most urban/suburban highway settings.
It sounds like there will be little consistency in tire pressure information between car manufacturers because of the exceptions permitted under the rule.
See this link - what do you think: http://www.citizen.org/autosafety/nhtsa/tread/tpms/index.cfm
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Since you're cross posting again I thought I'd let you know why I need to know if kindergarten had started. If you are taking it over, as you should, and are able to pass this time I'll be there for you, three years is a long time to make it through any grade. Good luck, you'll need it.
--

Life is a sexually transmitted condition that is always fatal.



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Dad wrote:

That is certainly an interesting response to my comment that described the problems with TPMs noted by one consumer group. Apparently you didn't understand their points. Understandable since some of the sentences were rather long and used words with more than one syllable. You had nothing to contribute and chose instead to start talking about kindergarten.

Why do you append inane phrases to your messages.
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Some of the manufacturers (Pontiac is one that comes to mind on the Bonneville) are already using such a system: it is easy to do on a car with ABS because you already have rotational sensors at each wheel - all you need is the proper software code to process the information and display it (uou look for differential in the number of pulses per mile from the ABS wheel sensora, which tanslates to a difference in diameter of the tires from one side to another, the theory being that most of the time not all tires are low on air pressure at the same time)..
Unfortunately, the NHTSA doesb't think such a speed sensor system is accurate enough - in a new safety mandate they haded down a few months ago that, if memory serves me correctly takes effect in 2010, that will require tire pressure monitoring on all cars. The NHTSA has specifically said that rotation sensor-based systems will NOT be acceptable.

I feel your pain - I miss my old Cadillac too. But lordy the new ones are so butt-ugly - last decent looking Cadillac was the last-generation Seville. I would not take a CTS if someone gave me one.
Regards, Bill Bowen Sacramento, CA
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wrote: snip

Even at my age my butt looks better than the CTS. My last Seville STS was a sad disappointment. Had it less the a year, still waiting for them to make something exciting again. May have to get a Z06 after the price gougers get done and just drive 2 Corvettes.
--

Life is a sexually transmitted condition that is always fatal.



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Dad wrote:

This system is already in use. I first saw it on the 97 Grand Prix. It was the same on my 2000 Grand Prix and is in place on my 2005 Grand Prix. Just a simple system that uses the abs wheel sensor to detect a difference in the rotational speed of the wheel compared to the others. I suppose if all tires were low to the same degree it wouldn't detect it. Had it warn of a low tire (nail) once so I guess it works.
Dave WI
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My mom's 2000 Regal has that low tire light system. The one that utilizes the ABS and TC system. Not sure if my new car, a 2006 Grand Prix, will have the actual pressure displayed or just a low tire warning...
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So we are a caddy forum now? Man I have learned more about cadilac in the last few days...
Hmmmm vette or caddy?
--

ZRiX (<>..<>)




"Luke" < snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com> wrote in message
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It appears the thread has been cross posted.
--
Don
"Some mornings it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps."
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ZRiX wrote:

Well the Caddy XLR and the Vette are very close to each other once you get under the skin.
Ian
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ZRiX wrote:

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ZRiX wrote:

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you need a special wieless tool to wake up your tire sensor, when you want to retate your tire position. that is a big problem for existing TPMS. because even tire maintain shop, they don't has this tool. it is very expensive, especially each car brand model has different tools. so even tire maintain shop they are not willing to buy it.
there is a one way you can rotate your tire. take back your wheel in correct location. and only change your tire (wheel can not be changed, becasue the tire sensor had monted in the wheel), because the OEM TPMS has no this new function for reconize seosor ID locatoin. so you only can do this way for DIY.
Try Orange TPMS (www.orange-electronic.com), Orange TPMS can be easy DIY to rotate your tire from front to rear or from right to lefe side and without any tool. that's a reason Orange TPMS is popular in TPMS market. you also can download their manual from their website. if you have any questoin for TPMS, you also can write email to Orange Electronic Co.Ltd. they are willing to help everybody for TPMS issue.
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Simply not true, you need to do better home work.

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the only one way for your DIY is put back your tire in correct way. then take off the tire only (wheel cannot be changed the location, because the tire sensor had monted in the wheel), then change tire location only, not wheel.
actually, they has a special wireless tool to wake up your tire, but the tool is not so cheap, and every car brand has differnet code tools, and these OEM sensor supplier has no technology for re-location function for without tool. therefor, even tire manitain shop, they hate that job for location tire.
Try Orange TPMS (www.orange-electronic.com), they has this function inside, thus, if you want to rotate your tire location, you just change it ans normal, their receiver will be auto catch the new ID and locatoin of tire. that is a new technology.
if you have any question in TPMS, you can just write them an email. they are willing to answer you any TPMS questions.
ZRiX wrote:

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Simply not true, you need to do better home work.
the only one way for your DIY is put back your tire in correct way. then take off the tire only (wheel cannot be changed the location, because the tire sensor had monted in the wheel), then change tire location only, not wheel.
actually, they has a special wireless tool to wake up your tire, but the tool is not so cheap, and every
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