Tires - what is the difference between types

I am specifically looking at the difference between tires "meant" (or designed for) light trucks with a P series designation and comparable car tires.
The exact size is P225/75R15. Doing tire searches at places like Active Green+Ross and TireRack.com has shown more truck tires than car tires, and I was wondering if using those truck tires would cause a car to mishandle. Vuarra
Quid quid latine dictum sit altum videtur. (That which is said in Latin sounds profound.)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Truck tires have a higher load rating. I recommend light truck tires as they wear better, and are far less likely to have " high tech " problems, like broken belts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Higher load rating is a result of heftier carcass construction. You can expect that size-for-size the 'truck' tires are heavier, increasing unsprung weight, and adversely effecting ride and handling. They also often have a 'blockier' tread pattern, better for poor condition grip, but almost always noisier. The real measure of load rating is the "load index" on the tirewall (P215/65 R15 89H ----> the '89' is the load index --> tires.com has the load charts on their site)
btw. the 'P' designation means 'Passenger Car' I believe, true truck tires will be labelled 'LT' for 'Light Truck'

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not exactly true as far as the load rating goes. I just bought a set of P255/70/15' s with a load rating of 108 (2100 lbs) Two nylon, and two steel ply construction. The comparable LT tire (6ply) had a load rating of 109. Since the C1500 that I am driving will never be able to carry a load that the tires are rated for...the P255's were the better choice for my buck. They handle and ride just fine, and the raised white letters go with the look of the truck.
Eightupman

problems,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Does the recommendation from Consumer Reports concerning the use of grippy tires in trucks have any foundation? According to them, and I believe that Ford warns about the same issue, a grippy tire will make a truck more prone to rolling over. The rationale is that LT tires would skid in the limit.
TIA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK, ANY vehicle driven improperly will roll over. Some that are more top heavy, ,such as the Ford explorer will have a higher chance of rolling if the driver puts the vehicle in a position (sideways) to roll. Jeep C-J 5 were notorious for this. Short wheelbase, high center of gravity. Ford's problem fell between the tire manufacturer wanting one air pressure and Ford putting a differnent value on thier placard. The tires came apart at a higher rate of speed in a turn. So Ford would say anything not to get thier ass sued again.
My truck, the C1500 sits very low to the ground as compared to the Explorer OR any 4WD. It is only a V6 and will never see the other side of 75-80 MPH, no less haul what the tires are rated. I bought a quality name tire, and not one of those econo no name tires.
So while being very happy with my purchase, I have no intentions whatsoever of buying "truck" tires....ever... for this truck.
After all it is totally up to what YOU personally feel comfortable with having on your ride. Some guys like Fruit of the Loom, and some like Hanes. Either way....BOTH will end up with skid marks!!!
Eightupman

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Motorsforum.com is a website by car enthusiasts for car enthusiasts. It is not affiliated with any of the car or spare part manufacturers or car dealers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.