Tough cuts coming for UAW

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Get accustomed to doors with smaller windows. Every manufacturer will be moving in that direction, as they introduce totally new models, to meet
upcoming federal side impact standards. Chrysler just happened to be doing so sooner than some others.
mike
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That is apparently true. The gap seems to be narrowing, but GM is still on top.

Most Americans like bigger cars. Understandably, perhaps. The USA has cheaper gas than most countries in the world, and long nice highways. In other countries the big wide gas guzzlers are not so appreciated by many.

Again, GM does make a wide range of vehicles. Their product mix is not the problem. In my mind, product quality and reliability WAS the problem. Now that GM has extended the warranty to 100,000 miles (limited warranty), do I feel better about GM? Not yet...I still fear a 'gotcha' hiding in there. Time will tell.
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Apparently you have not been reading the latest published short and long term consumers surveys. In those surveys both GM and Fords new vehicles are out scoring some of the best Toyota has to offer. It should also be pointed out the Toyota was the one with the most recalls in 2006.
mike

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And Toyota just announced another recall of Tundra trucks and Sequoia SUVs.
Mike Hunter wrote:

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"Screw the Customer" is GM's motto, not Toyota's
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There have been NUMEROUS cases where I wish GM HAD recalled their vehicles and fixed the mess they left to me.
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But when will GM recall the dreaded "leaking manifold". ???

<rj>
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The did that a long time ago.
mike

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Dont lie away nights waiting for this one...
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Get real, you may like to tout your import brand in a domestic NG but the fact is nearly 10 million of the 16.5 million vehicles sold in the US in 2006 were domestics. ALL of the sixteen or so import brands combined made up the balance.
Those GM and Ford trucks, that you think nobody wants to buy, are the two best selling vehicles in the country, selling at a rate nearly double that of the number one car.. The best selling vehicle in the county for thirty years in a row has been the Ford F150. When it come to trucks Toyota trucks are an also-ran in terms of sales. LOL
mike
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wrote:

I can't speak about all GM plants, but in the complex I worked in before I retired, 75% of the hourly are now "temps". The vast majority of those elgible took the early retirements. The temps have lower wages - around $14.00 per hour I think - and lower benefits. This may be the wave of the future; wait until the higher wage people retire and have a workforce being paid less with lower benefits. I could see the UAW agreeing to this, just to preserve their existance.
Side note: In Jan of 2005, it took 30 years seniority to hold a day shift job. It now takes 8.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Retired Shop Rat: 14,647 days in a GM plant. Now I can do what I enjoy: Large Format Photography
Web Site: www.destarr.com - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
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Lets say we have three GM car plants. a) USA workers pay $15/hour b) Mexico workers pay $5/hour c) China workers pay $1/hour
If you are a GM manager and you have to make a decision to increase production or shift production from one plant to the other. It may be a pretty obvious choice to go from a) to b) or c).
If you are a UAW boss and you are faced with decrease in number of workers in a). Can you accept less workers pay in a) or are you going to watch the work go away from a)? Do you demand that GM will pay the workers more in factories b) and c)?
David Starr wrote:

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I havent been in India in some years, BUT the last time I was there, building companies were using women to carry dirt out of excavations, in baskets on their heads. They paid these myriad women 3 rupees per day (less than $0.50).
Believe it or not, the owners felt this was economical for them compared to using heavy equipment, AND was socially compassionate since otherwise these women could not feed their families.
Without making my point strongly, I suspect that many of you will understand it anyway.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.nix wrote:

So the question is do we wait for them to get higher wages or will our wages go down?
Because of the huge differences in pay work is moving to these low cost areas and people in those areas are moving to us as well.
Eventually prices will adjust at least somewhat.
The Big Mac index shows the differences in value of currency.
I bought one Big Mac yesterday for the first time in some years. I notice it is much more expensive than what it was and I am wondering if it has got smaller. One trick people use is to give you less for the same price.
You see that in some cases when workers are made to work more hours for the same pay instead of lowering the wages.
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You are a bit off, autoworkers in Mexico earn 1,200 pesos an hour. That is less than $3. The average wage in China is equivalent to $600 a year or less than 30C an hour ;)
mike

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From what I've read.$14 is what Honda pays it workers in Ohio, Toyota and Nissan pay $13 in Kentucky and Tennessee, similar to what Wall-Mart pays forklift operators in their distribution centers. Apparently foreign and domestic manufacturers are building vehicles in Canada for an average of $1,000 less than in the US as well.
mike

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Mike Hunter wrote:

The part about Nissan is not true, my ex-wife made over $18.00 an hour FIFTEEN years ago, I believe they make around $24.00 an hour today. Terry
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wrote:

Oooooohhhh... thats right
They've SHED all those workers.
I suspect that even $13 in Kentucky is better than unemployment $$ in Michigan.
<rj>
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