Transmission cost

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money.


You're right, it is. And you can do anything you wish with your money and your cars. I just dont want to end up with one of them.
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for years.
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wrote in message

You could be right, Ed ;>)
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A transmission with 95K miles and has already had one flush done should be absolutely fine. Find a better shop, one that will do a real service (drop the pan, clean it out and replace the filter, and adjust the bands) and don't listen to those jokers. Isn't Tuffy a muffler shop anyway?
nate
snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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When I think of transmission service Tuffy dose not come to my mind.

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I just paid $2600 for my 2001 Le Sabre (114k miles). That aside, is your still running well? Sounds like someone is trying to make a quick buck. See if there is a local reputable shop around, not some big chain and get an opinion. Or just keep driving until it dies.
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I echo the comments of Bill and Mike. Some of these mechanics immediately suggest a flush with little apparent justification. I am not sold on the procedure.
Cost of replacement depends upon where you live. On that car, around here, you should be able to get a rebuild for $1-2000.
My son just had problems with his Honda hybrid, and the dealership (it is under extended warranty) mechanic told him they should flush the tranny THREE TIMES and maybe that would help. Mechanic claimed it was a maintenance issue, not a warranty issue. Since he had the paperwork to prove that all maintenance had been done at THAT dealership and on time, it made the storyline from the dealership a little thin. They, with red faces, agreed to fix the car.
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On 29 Jul 2006 22:53:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I suggest you replace your "repair shop" .
<rj>
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

are you experiencing any problems with the trans. or are you just doing PM? Based on your other posts I suspect the latter in which case you should find another shop. If you are having actual transmission problems, you should probably take it to someone that specializes in transmissions. This is where things get difficult, as most of the time unless you are lucky your local transmission shop will be an AAMCO or Cottman franchise, and I've heard enough horror stories about both I'd never set foot in either one. But you may be lucky and find a good independent transmission specialist, in which case treat him well and be very friendly.
nate
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I think that the transmission flush is totally bogus, dreamed up by marketing types. I think that is likely to do more damage that good. It forces oil backwards from normal flow disturbing stuff that would be best left alone and may damage the filter since it was not designed to support flow in that direction. It probably wouldn't remove much of the trapped dirt anyway. The flushing would not remove the metal that is stuck to the magnet that is attached to most oil pans. If the filter was replaced and the magnet cleaned after the flush, I would almost buy into it.
Transmission fluid is not contaminated by combustion by products like engine oil is. With this in mind it is not necessary to change all the fluid.
Dropping the pan, changing the filter and cleaning the pan is the only thing that needs to be done.
The only situation that I see a possible benefit to flushing is when the fluid shows evidence of damage like burning. And then only if the filter is changed afterwards. Likely though, the damage is already done and it will not help.

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This has always been my impression too, Scott, and I have seen this method touted as a good way of generating extra revenue.
If the car manufacturers felt this was so important, surely they - not the dealerships - would champion it strongly.
I normally service my own transmissions, but the last time I had the local independent mechanic do it for me. It was very reasonable, about $65 including filter, a few quarts of 7176 fluid, and adjust both bands.
Now that he has purchased a 'machine', the cost has gone up to $208. Ill have to ruminate on this.
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It's a good revenue generator...but it certainly is not "bogus". My air tools are all "revenue" generators...I suppose you think they are "bogus"? Our hoists for lifting cars up are "revenue generators"......I suppose you'd like me to be jacking the cars up and working on a creeper like I did in the 80's? Unfortunately, so many people in these newsgroups are totally out of touch with what it takes to maintain and repair cars these days.
People on this newsgroup that claim that it is bogus invariably have never used one, don't understand how they work, and probably have never even seen one.
Trust me, from someone who uses one everyday...they work well for what they are intended to do. You often hear people on here tell us all about how they removed a transmission cooler line, started the vehicle, allowed the fluid to drain out into a bucket, once they have drained out a few liters, they top up the trans, and continue doing it until the fluid has been "exchanged". These people are lauded as minor heroes for having figured out a way to exchange their trans fluid.
This is exactly how our machine works, except it's all automatic. I use it on my own cars, so does everyone in the shop.
Our machine happens to be a "GM recommended" machine. So it appears that they are quite comfortable with the machine. The same company that makes the trans flushing machine also makes the "required" transmission cooler flushing machine that GM makes all the dealerships buy.
Ian
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shiden_kai wrote:

Ian
I had to laugh. 30 years ago I read a funny piece that defined a "rip-off" as anything you paid money for.
A lot of the folks on this newsgroup are quick to volunteer advice on subjects about which they are completely ignorant, and most of those same folks are quick to label anybody who knows what they're doing and charges for repairing a vehicle, especially a dealer (dirty word!), a thief. In their eyes, the real problem is that you get PAID (another dirty word) to fix their cars.
The world's not getting any smarter, and some stuff just never changes.
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Sounds like you know about this process. Would you please address my concern about filter damage and not removing sludge from the pan and pan magnet? Am I right in understanding that it back flushes, that is it reverses the normal flow direction in the transmission? How much new fluid does it use to flush?
Thanks
wrote

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Scott Buchanan wrote:

A transmission fluid flush (I think that it's more accurate to describe it as a "fluid exchange") machine does just that....exchanges the fluid. This does not mean that it is a replacement for the tried and true transmission "service". In our shop, we incorporate both procedures into the overall maintenance schedule of a vehicle. The transmission service...ie: where you drop the pan and replace the filter is an extremely important service. If I had a choice of doing only one of the procedures on my own vehicles...I would definitely choose the service over the flush.
As far as how the machines work, I can't talk about any other machines other then the one we use....as I'm not familiar with them. Our machine is simple, you have two lines that you hook up to a transmission cooler line "in series". It doesn't matter which line hooks up to which cooler line as the machine autosenses the line pressure. The machine maintains the line pressure that the transmission would normally have through the cooler line and simply dumps the old fluid coming from the transmission and feeds new fluid through the other line into the transmission at the same flow rate and pressure. There is "no" reverse flushing going on. This would make no sense when working with an automatic transmission. You "reverse" flush a heater core....not an automatic. And there are good reasons why you would reverse flush a heater core, but that's another subject.
As far as the amount of fluid used, we normally run about 12 liters through the average car/truck transmission. This is a bit more then the total capacity, so that you are sure you are getting pretty much all of the fluid out. If I get one that the fluid is black....I'll run enough fluid thru to make sure I'm getting nothing but fresh clean fluid out of the machine. We do not leave any old burnt fluid in the machine. The machine also has internal fluid filters of it's own inside the machine.
On the Allison truck transmissions, we have to run approx 30 liters of fluid through the machine to get it completely clean. Big transmission!
Ian
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How is it working? What is the mileage?
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On 29 Jul 2006 22:53:49 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I saw your house yesterday while driving past it on the bus, and you need your plumbing and electrical system replaced. Both are in real bad shape and will fail soon.
This is another example of BULLSHIT.
One of two things..... (or both) THEY WANT YOUR MONEY THEY DONT WANT TO DO THE JOB
As long as the transmission is working properly, it's NOT toast.
However, is there a reason you took it to the shop, or is it just regular maintenance? You never said the reason.....
I'd get a second and maybe even 3rd opinion. Get a recommendation from a friend for a mechanic. Using the yellow pages is not always the best. This place might be short on work and just figured you were an idiot and would fall for their scam. Who knows if they will even rebuild it, or just change the fluid and clean the exterior of it for BIG DOLLARS.
Why not just change the fluid and filter yourself? It's not really that hard to do. I did it last fall on my 89 Chevy. It costed me about $12 for the filter and gasket, and another $12 for 5 qts of fluid. Plus a little silicone gasket adhesive. Total cost about $25 and 2 hours of work. One thing, I do is be sure the pan is clean. I scrubbed it with dish soap, then hosed it out with water. Of course use a rag to dry and be sure it's completely dry. I also greased the linkage at the same time.
As for your question about the cost, why even bother asking a question like that on a newsgroup. What costs $1000 in California may only cost $300 in Ohio and in the UK, who knows how many pounds it costs. Asking prices on the newsgroup is assenine. Call local transmission shops and get estimates. One other thing, you can often buy a rebuilt trans at a parts store, far cheaper than getting yours rebuilt. Of course you have to find someone to replace it for you.
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